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  1. Did U.S. Governments Violate Individual Human Rights? A Thomistic Response to COVID‐19 Government Mandates.Nathaniel A. Moats - forthcoming - New Blackfriars.
  • A Question of Distributive and Social Justice: Public Relations Practitioners and the Marketplace.David L. Martinson - 1998 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 13 (3):141-151.
    The marketplace of ideas theoy has been utilized as one means to justify,from a societal perspective, contempora y public relations practice. Proponents confend that practitioners serve society in true Miltonian fashion by helping clients inject their views into that marketplace. One must question, however, whether afunctional marketplace of ideas exists relative to the public relations process. Further, by focusing ethical questions on individualistic practitioner behavior relative to that marketplace, practitioners may not be paying sulyicient attention to the demands of distributive (...)
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  • At the Margins of Personhood: Rethinking Law and Life Beyond the Impasses of Biopolitics.Ayten Gündoğdu - 2021 - Constellations 28 (4):570-587.
    Constellations, Volume 28, Issue 4, Page 570-587, December 2021.
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  • The Concept of Dignity in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.Glenn Hughes - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (1):1-24.
    This essay examines the function of the concept of human dignity (both as an inherent feature of human existence and as an ideal achievement) in the United Nations's 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It explains why the key framers of the document affirmed an inherent human dignity in order to provide an explanatory basis for the validity of universal human rights while eschewing any religious or metaphysical justification for this affirmation. It argues that the key framers, while aware of (...)
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  • Natural Rights to Welfare.Siegfried Van Duffel - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):641-664.
    : Many people have lamented the proliferation of human rights claims. The cure for this problem, it may be thought, would be to develop a theory that can distinguish ‘real’ from ‘supposed’ human rights. I argue, however, that the proliferation of human rights mirrors a deep problem in human rights theory itself. Contemporary theories of natural rights to welfare are historical descendants from a theory of rights to subsistence which was developed in twelfth-century Europe. According to this theory, each human (...)
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  • Embracing the Humanistic Vision: Recurrent Themes in Peter Roberts’ Recent Writings.James Reveley - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):312-321.
    Running like a leitmotif through Peter Roberts’ recently published philosophico-educational writings there is a humanistic thread, which this article picks out. In order to ascertain the quality of this humanism, Roberts is positioned in relation to a pair of extant humanisms: radical and integral. Points of comparability and contrast are identified in several of the writer’s genre-crossing essays. These texts, it is argued, rectify deficiencies in how the two humanisms envision alternatives to capitalism. Roberts skilfully teases out the non-obvious futurological (...)
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  • Science and Human Rights.Jay Schulkin - 1991 - World Futures 32 (4):243-253.
  • Reimagining a Global Ethic.Michael Ignatieff - 2012 - Ethics and International Affairs 26 (1):7-19.
    “Reimagining a global ethic” is a project worthy of Andrew Carnegie and of the Carnegie Council's upcoming commemoration of his founding gift in 1914. As a collaborative research project stretching forward over the next three years, it ought to be integrative and reconciliatory: that is, it must try to understand the globalization of ethics that has accompanied the globalization of commerce and communications and to figure out what ethical values human beings share across all our differences of race, religion, ethnicity, (...)
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