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Plato and the Other Companions of Sokrates

Cambridge University Press (2010)

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  1. Philebus.Verity Harte - 2012 - In Gerald Press (ed.), The Continuum Companion to Plato. pp. 81-83.
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  • Rethinking Plato: A Cartesian Quest for the Real Plato.Necip Fikri Alican - 2012 - Amsterdam and New York: Brill | Rodopi.
    This book is a quest for the real Plato, forever hiding behind the veil of drama. The quest, as the subtitle indicates, is Cartesian in that it looks for Plato independently of the prevailing paradigms on where we are supposed to find him. The result of the quest is a complete pedagogical platform on Plato. This does not mean that the book leaves nothing out, covering all the dialogues and all the themes, but that it provides the full intellectual apparatus (...)
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  • The Origins of the Developmental Paradigm for the Interpretation of Plato’s Dialogues.Renato Matoso - 2016 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 18:75-111.
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  • Platon: Biografia.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    Principala sursă biografică despre Platon, după mărturia neoplatonicului Simplicius, ar fi fost scrisă de discipolul Xenocrate, dar din păcate nu a ajuns la noi. Cea mai veche biografie a lui Platon care a ajuns până la noi, De Platone et dogmate eius, este a unui autor latin din secolul al II-lea, Apuleius. Toate celelalte biografii ale lui Platon au fost scrise la peste cinci sute de ani de la moartea sa. Istoricul grec Diogene (secolele II și III) este autorul unei (...)
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  • Pathos, Pleasure and the Ethical Life in Aristippus.Kristian Urstad - 2009 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy.
    For many of the ancient Greek philosophers, the ethical life was understood to be closely tied up with important notions like rational integrity, self-control, self-sufficiency, and so on. Because of this, feeling or passion (pathos), and in particular, pleasure, was viewed with suspicion. There was a general insistence on drawing up a sharp contrast between a life of virtue on the one hand and one of pleasure on the other. While virtue was regarded as rational and as integral to advancing (...)
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  • The Self-Seeing Soul in the Alcibiades I.Daniel Werner - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):307-331.
    The Alcibiades I concludes with an arresting image of an eye that sees itself by looking into another eye. Using the dialogue as a whole, I offer a detailed interpretation of this image and I discuss its implications for the question of self-knowledge. The Alcibiades I reveals both what self-knowledge is (knowledge of soul in its particularity and its universality) and how we are to seek it (by way of philosophical dialogue). This makes the pursuit of self-knowledge an inescapably social (...)
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  • Two Theories of Natural Justice in Plato’s Gorgias.Leo Catana - 2021 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 42 (2):209-228.
    In Plato’s Gorgias 482c4–484c3, Callicles advances a concept of natural justice: the laws of the polis must agree with nature, that is, human nature. Since human nature is characterised by its desire to get a greater share, nature itself makes it legitimate that stronger human beings get a greater share than weaker ones. Socrates objects: Callicles’ theoretical approach to civic life poses a threat to the polis’ community, its citizens, and to the friendship amongst its citizens. However, Socrates accepts Callicles’ (...)
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  • Plato's Politicus, an Eleatic Sophist on Politics.V. Tejera - 1978 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 5 (1):106-125.
  • The Unity of the Soul in Plato's Republic.Eric Brown - 2012 - In Rachel Barney, Tad Brennan & Charles Brittain (eds.), Plato and the Divided Self. Cambridge, UK: pp. 53-73.
    This essay argues that Plato in the Republic needs an account of why and how the three distinct parts of the soul are parts of one soul, and it draws on the Phaedrus and Gorgias to develop an account of compositional unity that fits what is said in the Republic.
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  • Habladurías Sobre Tiranos Felices. Platón y Jenofonte a Propósito de Filosofía, Tiranía y Buen Gobierno.Claudia Marsico - 2020 - Plato Journal 20:39-53.
    Plato and Xenophon had different perspectives on the better governance. In this paper, I study the notion of tyranny in Plato's Republic and Xenophon's Hiero to trace their views on the aptitude of philosophy to redeem the tyrant and indicate some intertextual points. On this basis, I analyse the meaning and extent of Simonides’ proposal in the Hiero rejecting the idea of a mere pragmatic approach. Finally, I examine the platonic Hipparchusto find a key to figure out the election of (...)
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  • On Knowledge as a Condition for Courage in Plato’s Protagoras.Erik Christensen - 2009 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 12 (1):70-84.
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  • Erôs and Education : Socratic Seduction in Three Platonic Dialogues.Hege Dypedokk Johnsen - 2016 - Dissertation, Stockholm University
    Plato’s Socrates is famous for claiming that “I know one thing: That I know nothing”. There is one subject that Socrates repeatedly claims to have expertise in, however: ta erôtika. Socrates also refers to this expertise as his erôtikê technê, which may be translated as “erotic expertise”. In this dissertation, I investigate Socrates’ erotic expertise: what kind of expertise is it, what is it constituted by, where is it put into practice, and how is it practiced? I argue that the (...)
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  • Prudence, Rationality and Happiness in Aristippus.Kristian Urstad - 2008 - Gnosis.
    It is noticeably clear from several ancient sources that the hedonist Aristippus of Cyrene (a friend and student of Socrates) asks us to concentrate on enjoying the pleasures of the present or near­ future. What is not so obvious is his reason for such a recommendation. Although any explanation for this is bound to be somewhat speculative due to the inadequacy of the sources, I would like to offer a possible rationale for, and subsequent reconstruction of, his view, one which (...)
     
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  • Plato's Protagoras the Hedonist.Joshua Wilburn - 2016 - Classical Philology 113 (3):224-244.
    I advocate an ad hominem reading of the hedonism that appears in the final argument of the Protagoras. I that attribute hedonism both to the Many and to Protagoras, but my focus is on the latter. I argue that the Protagoras in various ways reflects Plato’s view that the sophist is an inevitable advocate for, and himself implicitly inclined toward, hedonism, and I show that the text aims through that characterization to undermine Protagoras’ status as an educator. One of my (...)
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  • The Legacy of Hermes: Deception and Dialectic in Plato’s Cratylus.Olof Pettersson - 2016 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):26-58.
    Against the background of a conventionalist theory, and staged as a defense of a naturalistic notion of names and naming, the critique of language developed in Plato’s Cratylus does not only propose that human language, in contrast to the language of the gods, is bound to the realm of myth and lie. The dialogue also concludes by offering a set of reasons to think that knowledge of reality is not within the reach of our words. Interpretations of the dialogue’s long (...)
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  • Clitophon and Socrates in the Platonic Clitophon.Christopher Moore - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):257-278.
  • Goethe, Schleirmacher y la Valoración Del Ion.Javier Aguirre - 2012 - Endoxa 29:73.
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  • Aristotle's Ethics and the Crafts: A Critique.Thomas Peter Stephen Angier - unknown
    This dissertation is a study of the relation between Aristotle’s ethics and the crafts (or technai). My thesis is that Aristotle’s argument is at key points shaped by models proper to the crafts, this shaping being deeper than is generally acknowledged, and philosophically more problematic. Despite this, I conclude that the arguments I examine can, if revised, be upheld. The plan of the dissertation is as follows – Preface: The relation of my study to the extant secondary literature; Introduction: The (...)
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  • Meno, the Slave Boy and the Elenchos.Hugh H. Benson - 1990 - Phronesis 35 (1):128-158.
  • Platón y el conflicto entre la vieja y la nueva poseía.Javier Aguirre - 2013 - Convivium: revista de filosofía 26:5-28.
    Las numerosas acusaciones formuladas por Platón contra la poesía aparecen a lo largo de toda su obra, referidas tanto al contenido como a la forma, y se basan en diversos supuestos éticos, políticos y metafísicos. Sin embargo, tales ataques no son lanzados con-tra la poesía como tal, sino contra la poesía tradicional y su importante presencia en el ámbito educativo griego. Frente a la tradición poética y frente a las distintas corrientes intelectuales que se disputan el espacio educativo de su (...)
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  • Elenchus, Recollection, and the Method of Hypothesis in the Meno.Cristina Ionescu - 2017 - Plato Journal: The Journal of the International Plato Society 17:9-29.
    The Meno is often interpreted as an illustration of Plato’s decision to replace elenchus with recollection and the method of hypothesis. My paper challenges this view and defends instead two theses: that far from replacing elenchus, the method of hypothesis incorporates and uses elenctic arguments in order to test and build its own steps; and that recollection is not a method of search on a par with elenchus and the method of hypothesis, but is rather primarily a theory that accounts (...)
     
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  • Comparing Lives in Plato, Laws 5.James Warren - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (4):319-346.
    In Laws 5, the Athenian argues in favour of virtuous over vicious lives on the basis that the former are preferable to the latter when we consider the pleasures and pains in each. This essay offers an interpretation of the argument which does not attribute to the Athenian an exclusively hedonist axiology. It argues for a new reading of the division of ‘types of life’ at 733c-d and suggests that the Athenian relies on the conclusion established earlier in the Laws (...)
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  • The Arabico-Islamic Background of Al-Fārābī's Logic.Sadik Türker - 2007 - History and Philosophy of Logic 28 (3):183-255.
    This paper examines al-F?r?b?'s logical thought within its Arabico-Islamic historical background and attempts to conceptualize what this background contributes to his logic. After a brief exposition of al-F?r?b?'s main problems and goals, I shall attempt to reformulate the formal structure of Arabic linguistics (AL) in terms of the ontological and formal characteristics that Arabic logic is built upon. Having discussed the competence of al-F?r?b? in the history of AL, I will further propose three interrelated theses about al-F?r?b?'s logic, in terms (...)
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  • On the Value of Drunkenness in the Laws.Nicholas Baima - 2017 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 20 (1):65-81.
    Plato’s attitude towards drunkenness (μέθη) is surprisingly positive in the Laws, especially as compared to his negative treatment of intoxication in the Republic. In the Republic, Plato maintains that intoxication causes cowardice and intemperance (3.398e-399e, 3.403e, and 9.571c-573b), while in the Laws, Plato holds that it can produce courage and temperance (1.635b, 1.645d-650a, and 2.665c-672d). This raises the question: Did Plato change his mind, and if he did, why? Ultimately, this paper answers affirmatively and argues that this marks a substantive (...)
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  • Colloquium 3.Mary Whitlock Blundell - 1992 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 8 (1):115-133.
  • As Happy As Can Be: How Republic's Philosophers Fare Best by Ruling.Cathal Woods - 2010 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 4 (1).