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  1. Ethical Investing: Ethical Investors and Managers.Richard Hudson - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):641-657.
    “Ethical investing” is interpreted in the following paper to be the use of non-financial normative criteria by investors in the choice ofsecurities for their portfolios.Ethical investors may aim at fulfilling duties they feel they have, possibly including increasing the amount of good in society through theconsequences of their buying and selling behavior. The main duties are those of not-profiting from bad corporate behavior and of punishing bad (or rewarding good) firms. The main consequence desired is that managers manage corporations in (...)
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  • Signaling Positive Corporate Social Performance.Ray Jones & Audrey J. Murrell - 2001 - Business and Society 40 (1):59-78.
    A firm’s social performance can shape the impressions of key stakeholders, such as employees, customers, suppliers, and investors, that influence subsequent decision making and relationships to the firm. To test this notion, we examine how a firm’s public recognition for exemplary social performance can serve as a positive signal of the firm’s business performance to shareholders. We conduct an event study of firms named to Working Mothermagazine’s list of “Most Family- Friendly Companies” for the first time between 1989 and 1994. (...)
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  • The Relationship between Social and Financial Performance.Ronald M. Roman, Sefa Hayibor & Bradley R. Agle - 1999 - Business and Society 38 (1):109-125.
    A primary issue in the field of business and society over the past 25 years has been the relationship between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance. Recently, Griffin and Mahon (1997) presented a table categorizing studies that have investigated this relationship. Motivated by concerns with this table, as well as a desire to account for progress in research in this area, the authors reconstructed it. The authors present a portrait of this relationship that is (a) substantially different from that (...)
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  • Commitment, Revelation, and the Testaments of Belief: The Metrics of Measurement of Corporate Social Performance.Barry M. Mitnick - 2000 - Business and Society 39 (4):419-465.
    Three characteristic problems in the measurement of corporate social performance (CSP) center around the need to measure three “metrics”: the metric of performance evaluation (M1), the metric of performance measurement (M2), and the metric of performance perception and belief (M3). The central issues in each metric are commitment, revelation, and belief, respectively. This article discusses each metric and provides sets of theoretical propositions under M2 and M3 describing behavior in those contexts. Some of the propositions inM2form an explicit partial theory (...)
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  • A Brand New Brand of Corporate Social Performance.Tim Rowley & Shawn Berman - 2000 - Business and Society 39 (4):397-418.
    We argue that corporate social performance (CSP) has become a legitimizing identity (brand) for researchers in the business and society field, but it has not developed into a viable theoretical or operational construct. Because measuring CSP is contingent on the operational setting (industry, issues, etc.), it is difficult to produce worthwhile comparisons across studies or generalizing beyond the boundaries of a specific study. The authors suggest that researchers remove the CSP label from their operational variables, and instead narrowly define their (...)
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  • A Longitudinal Study of Significant Change in Stakeholder Management.Christine Shropshire & Amy J. Hillman - 2007 - Business and Society 46 (1):63-87.
    Despite rich theoretical development, empirical research on stakeholder management is scant, save its relationship with financial performance. Recent research shows significant intrafirm variability in stakeholder management across time. This study seeks to explain why firms would experience significant changes in stakeholder management. Adapting Wood’s framework to discuss three principles of stakeholder management, the authors identify antecedents of change at the institutional, organizational, and executive levels. Pressures for legitimacy at the institutional level suggest that firm age and size, along with industry (...)
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  • Taking Aim at Business.Jamie R. Hendry - 2006 - Business and Society 45 (1):47-86.
    Although business and society scholars have sought to demonstrate that corporate social performance (CSP) leads to corporate financial performance (CFP), a complete model of the pathway from CSP to CFP has not been substantiated. One suggestion is that certain indicators of CSP are noticed by stakeholders, who then act in ways that ultimately affect the firm's CFP. The present study focused on the first step in this path: identifying the factors that initially lead a stakeholder group to target a particular (...)
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  • Beyond Market Strategies: How Multiple Decision-Maker Groups Jointly Influence Underperforming Firms’ Corporate Social (Ir)responsibility.Xi Zhong, Liuyang Ren & Tiebo Song - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (2):481-499.
    Research based on the behavioral theory of the firm (BTOF) argues that firms will actively adopt strategic actions to respond to performance that falls below aspirations, that is performance shortfalls. However, most previous studies have focused on market-related strategic actions, paying less attention to the impact of performance shortfalls on non-market-related strategic actions, especially corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate social irresponsibility (CSI). In this study, we propose that firms facing performance shortfalls are likely to reduce CSR levels and increase (...)
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  • How and When Does Corporate Giving Lead to Getting? An Investigation of the Relationship Between Corporate Philanthropy and Relative Competitive Performance from a Micro-process Perspective.Wenwen Zhao & Zhe Zhang - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (2):425-440.
    The corporate ethics literature has considerably focused on whether giving results in getting. However, the relationship between corporate philanthropy and performance and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Drawing on signaling and cue consistency theories, we develop and test a model that specifies whether, how, and when corporate philanthropy benefits relative competitive performance from a micro-process perspective. Using a Chinese sample of 1623 employees, 145 CEOs, and 145 human resources managers, we found that corporate philanthropy could positively influence relative competitive performance (...)
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  • Corporate Philanthropy and Stock Price Crash Risk: Evidence from China.Min Zhang, Lu Xie & Haoran Xu - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (3):595-617.
    How to mitigate stock price crash risk has become a focus in the theoretical and practical fields. Building on the work of Kim et al., this paper investigates the relation between corporate philanthropy and crash risk under the unique Chinese institutional background. The results show that both state ownership and the 2005 split share reform attenuate the mitigating effect of corporate philanthropy on crash risk. Specifically, the negative relation between corporate philanthropy and crash risk is less pronounced for state-owned enterprises (...)
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  • Board Composition and Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation in the Post Sarbanes-Oxley Era. [REVIEW]Jason Q. Zhang, Hong Zhu & Hung-bin Ding - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):381-392.
    Although the composition of the board of directors has important implications for different aspects of firm performance, prior studies tend to focus on financial performance. The effects of board composition on corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance remain an under-researched area, particularly in the period following the enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). This article specifically examines two important aspects of board composition (i.e., the presence of outside directors and the presence of women directors) and their relationship with CSR (...)
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  • CSR Initiatives as Market Signals: A Review and Research Agenda.Fabrizio Zerbini - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (1):1-23.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a basis for a systematic development of signaling theory on CSR initiatives. The paper proposes signaling theory as a framework supportive of a strategic CSR approach; maps extant research on signaling through CSR initiatives; offers a comprehensive assessment of the most diffused CSR initiatives and discusses their eligibility as signaling devices; and outlines a research agenda to further develop and test signaling theory in business ethics. Specifically, the study reconsiders some key assumptions, (...)
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  • Effects of Illegal Behavior on the Financial Performance of US Banking Institutions.Mohamad Jamal Zeidan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):313-324.
    This study investigates whether financial performance is affected by corporate violations of laws and regulations. In a sample of 128 publicly traded banks that were subject to enforcement actions by US regulatory authorities over a 20-year period, we observed a significant negative market reaction pursuant to the violations. However, the market reaction did not vary meaningfully in accordance with the severity or repetitiveness of the violation. The results of this study are in conformity with previous research on industries other than (...)
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  • An Empirical Study of the World Price of Sustainability.Yuchao Xiao, Robert Faff, Philip Gharghori & Darren Lee - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):297-310.
    The core goal of this study is to empirically investigate whether there is a “world price” of corporate sustainability. This is assessed in the context of standard asset pricing models—in particular, by asking whether a risk premium attaches to a sustainability factor after controlling for the Fama–French factors. Both time-series and cross-sectional tests are formulated and applied. The results show that (1) global Fama–French factors have strong power to explain global equity returns and (2) sustainability investments have no significant impact (...)
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  • Corporate perceptions of the business case for supplier diversity: How socially responsible purchasing can 'pay'. [REVIEW]Ian Worthington - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):47 - 60.
    In exploring corporate perceptions of the business case for supplier diversity (SD), this paper reports on a cross-national study of large purchasing organisations (LPOs) that had introduced, or were in the process of introducing, purchasing initiatives aimed at ethnic minority businesses (EMBs). The research investigates how LPOs portray the benefits of this form of socially responsible purchasing and suggests a business case construct based on four component elements. It also highlights a number of contextual factors that appear to have shaped (...)
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  • Corporate Perceptions of the Business Case for Supplier Diversity: How Socially Responsible Purchasing can ‘Pay’.Ian Worthington - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):47-60.
    In exploring corporate perceptions of the business case for supplier diversity, this paper reports on a cross-national study of large purchasing organisations that had introduced, or were in the process of introducing, purchasing initiatives aimed at ethnic minority businesses. The research investigates how LPOs portray the benefits of this form of socially responsible purchasing and suggests a business case construct based on four component elements. It also highlights a number of contextual factors that appear to have shaped business case rationales. (...)
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  • The Elephant in the Room: The Nascent Research Agenda on Corporations, Social Responsibility, and Capitalism.Christopher Wickert, Laura J. Spence, Dirk Matten & Frank G. A. de Bakker - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1295-1302.
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  • Human Rights: A Promising Perspective for Business & Society.Florian Wettstein, Harry J. Van Buren & Judith Schrempf-Stirling - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (5):1282-1321.
    In his invited essay for Business & Society’s 60th anniversary, Archie B. Carroll refers to human rights as “a topic that holds considerable promise for CSR [corporate social responsibility] researchers in the future.” The objective of this article is to unpack this promise. We discuss the momentum of business and human rights in international policy, national regulation, and corporate practice, review how and why BHR scholarship has been thriving, provide a conceptual framework to analyze how BHR and corporate social responsibility (...)
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  • Institutional investor activism on socially responsible investment: effects and expectations.Shuangge Wen - 2009 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 18 (3):308-333.
    Concentrated attention on institutional investors' activism has been perceived in the last few decades and further intensified in the post‐Enron era. A new area of particular significance that has emerged is institutional investors' growing awareness and practice of socially responsible investment (SRI). This article starts by reviewing the importance of institutional investor activism and the historical implication of SRI. Significantly, various elements that give rise to the growth of SRI in the modern business world are considered in detail. It is (...)
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  • Rethinking the Corporate Financial-Social Performance Relationship: Examining the Complex, Multistakeholder Notion of Corporate Social Performance.James Weber & Jeffrey Gladstone - 2014 - Business and Society Review 119 (3):297-336.
    The corporate financial performance (CFP)–corporate social performance (CSP) relationship has been investigated many times over the past few decades, yet the notion of CSP has generally been understood to be a single, monolithic aspect of corporate strategy. This article examines the common CFP–CSP understanding in three distinct ways: (1) by extending the evaluation of CSP as a complex, multistakeholder notion; (2) by analyzing CSP's relationship with the firm's financial performance at a given point in time as a lead (independent) variable (...)
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  • The Impact of Four Types of Corporate Social Performance on Reputation and Financial Performance.Yijing Wang & Guido Berens - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):337-359.
    The goal of this paper was to investigate whether and how a firm that engages in different kinds of corporate social performance can create a favorable corporate reputation among its stakeholders, and as a result achieve a good financial performance. Building on stakeholder theory, we distinguish two types of reputation—reputation among public stakeholders and reputation among financial stakeholders. We argue that CSP activities affect these two reputations differently. In addition, we empirically test the relationship among different types of CSP, reputation (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility, Investor Behaviors, and Stock Market Returns: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in China. [REVIEW]Maobin Wang, Chun Qiu & Dongmin Kong - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (1):127 - 141.
    This article studies how financial investors respond to firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance in terms of their investing behaviors, and how such behaviors change contingent on an event that provokes their attention and concerns to CSR. Using the melamine contamination incident in China as a natural experiment, it is found that neither the individual investors' nor the institutional investors' behaviors are influenced by firms' CSR performance before the incident. Nevertheless, in the post-event period, institutional investors' behaviors are significantly influenced (...)
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  • The rationality-of-ends/market-structure grid: Positioning and contrasting different approaches to business ethics.Sigmund Wagner-Tsukamoto - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 17 (3):326–346.
    This paper presents the 'rationality-of-ends/market-structure grid'. With this grid, the article contrasts, in economic terms, different approaches to business ethics and addresses the question how far and what type of business ethics is feasible. Four basic scenarios for business ethics are outlined that imply different conceptualizations of business ethics. The grid interrelates a rationality-of-ends dimension with a market-structure dimension. The rationality-of-ends dimension ranges from opportunism and self-interested egoism to self-interested altruism and ultimately to authentic altruism. The market-structure dimension ranges from (...)
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  • The rationality-of-ends/market-structure grid: positioning and contrasting different approaches to business ethics.Sigmund Wagner-Tsukamoto - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (3):326-346.
    This paper presents the ‘rationality‐of‐ends/market‐structure grid’. With this grid, the article contrasts, in economic terms, different approaches to business ethics and addresses the question how far and what type of business ethics is feasible. Four basic scenarios for business ethics are outlined that imply different conceptualizations of business ethics. The grid interrelates a rationality‐of‐ends dimension with a market‐structure dimension. The rationality‐of‐ends dimension ranges from opportunism and self‐interested egoism to self‐interested altruism and ultimately to authentic altruism. The market‐structure dimension ranges from (...)
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  • Exploring the Nature of the Relationship Between CSR and Competitiveness.Marc Vilanova, Josep Maria Lozano & Daniel Arenas - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (S1):57-69.
    This paper explores the nature of the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and competitiveness. We start with the commonly held view that firm competitiveness is defined by the market. That is, the question of what are the critical competitiveness factors is answered by looking at how companies and financial analysts describe and evaluate a firm. To analyze this, we review the current state of the art on the relationship between CSR and competitiveness. Second, CSR criteria used by financial analysts (...)
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  • A study of the link between a corporation's financial performance and its commitment to ethics.Curtis C. Verschoor - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (13):1509-1516.
    A number of studies have tested the relationship between a corporation's social and ethical performance and its financial performance. In contrast, this is the first study to demonstrate a link between overall financial performance and an emphasis on ethics as an aspect of corporate governance. It identifies the 26.8 percent of the 500 largest U.S. public corporations that, in their annual report to shareholders, commit to ethical behavior toward their stakeholders or emphasize compliance with their code of conduct. The financial (...)
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  • The worth of values – a literature review on the relation between corporate social and financial performance.Pieter van Beurden & Tobias Gössling - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):407-424.
    One of the older questions in the debate about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is whether it is worthwhile for organizations to pay attention to societal demands. This debate was emotionally, normatively, and ideologically loaded. Up to the present, this question has been an important trigger for empirical research in CSR. However, the answer to the question has apparently not been found yet, at least that is what many researchers state. This apparent ambivalence in CSR consequences invites a literature study that (...)
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  • “Managing” Corporate Community Involvement.Judith M. van der Voort, Katherina Glac & Lucas C. P. M. Meijs - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):311-329.
    In academic research, many attempts have been undertaken to legitimize corporate community involvement by showing a business case for it. However, much less attention has been devoted to building understanding about the actual dynamics and challenges of managing CCI in the business context. As an alternative to existing predominantly static and top-down approaches, this paper introduces a social movement framework for analyzing CCI management. Based on the analysis of qualitative case study data, we argue that the active role of employees (...)
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  • An Employee-Centered Model of Corporate Social Performance.Harry J. van Buren Iii - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (4):687-709.
    Although the concept of corporate social performance (CSP) has become more clearly specified in recent years, an analysis of CSP from the perspective of one particular stakeholder group has been largely ignored in this research: employees. It is proposed that employees merit specific attention with regard to assessments of corporate social performance. In this paper, a model for evaluating and measuring CSP at the employee level is proposed, and implications for evaluating contemporary employment policies and practices are offered. An iterative (...)
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  • Definition, Conceptualization, and Measurement of Corporate Environmental Performance: A Critical Examination of a Multidimensional Construct. [REVIEW]C. Trumpp, J. Endrikat, C. Zopf & E. Guenther - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-20.
    Corporate environmental performance (CEP) has been of fundamental interest in scholarly research during the last few decades. However, there is a great deal of disagreement pertaining to the definition, conceptualization, and adequate measurement of CEP. Our study addresses these issues and provides a methodologically rigorous and comprehensive examination of content validity and construct validity. By integrating the available literature on CEP, we derive a parsimonious definition and theoretically sound framework of the focal construct. Drawing on non-aggregated and publicly available data (...)
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  • Moving beyond the business case for female leaders: A longitudinal panel study of the impact of female leadership on corporate social responsibility.John Tichenor, Alan Green, Jessica West & Randall Croom - 2022 - Business and Society Review 127 (3):639-661.
    This article examines the impact of female leadership on corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices in publicly traded corporations. Our analysis finds that female leadership matters. For example, female leadership at the board level increases the likelihood of having a female CEO and the overall percentage of women executives in firms. The study measures CSR practices using the Thomson Reuters corporate responsibility ratings (TRCRR) from the Thomson Reuters ASSET4 database for 1242 firms over a 7-year period, from 2009 to 2015. Panel (...)
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  • The Impact of Human Resource Management on Corporate Social Performance Strengths and Concerns.Sandra Rothenberg, Clyde Eiríkur Hull & Zhi Tang - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (3):391-418.
    Although high-performance human resource practices do not directly affect corporate social performance strengths, they do positively affect CSP strengths in companies that are highly innovative or have high levels of slack. High-performance human resource management practices also directly and negatively affect CSP concerns. Drawing on the resource-based view and using secondary data from an objective, third-party database, the authors develop and test hypotheses about how high-performance HRM affects a company’s CSP strengths and concerns. Findings suggest that HRM and innovation are (...)
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  • Researches in Corporate Social Responsibility: A Review of Shifting Focus, Paradigms, and Methodologies. [REVIEW]Shallini S. Taneja, Pawan Kumar Taneja & Rajen K. Gupta - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (3):343-364.
    Owing to the growing academic and practitioner’s interest in the field of Corporate Social Responsibility, there is a need to do a comprehensive assessment and synthesis of research activities. This article addresses this need and examines the academic literature on Corporate Social Responsibility and Performance using a paradigmatic and methodological lens. The objective of this article is fourfold. First, it examines the status of CSR research from its beginning especially after 1970 to year 2008 in leading academic journals and reports (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Productivity: Evidence from the Chemical Industry in the United States.Li Sun & Marty Stuebs - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):251-263.
    Prior research suggests that participating in corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities can lead to higher future productivity. However, the empirical evidence is still scarce. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between CSR and future firm productivity in the U.S. chemical industry. Specifically, this study examines the relationship between CSR in year t and firm productivity in year (t + 1), (t + 2), and (t + 3). We use Data Envelopment Analysis, a non-parametric method, to measure (...)
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  • Business Reputation and Labor Efficiency, Productivity, and Cost.Marty Stuebs & Li Sun - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):265 - 283.
    Assumed benefits from improved reputation are often used as motives to drive corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. Are improved cost efficiencies among these reputation benefits? Cost efficiencies and cost management have become more relevant as revenue streams dry up in these tough economic times. Can a good reputation aid these efforts to develop cost efficiencies specifically when managing labor costs? Prior research hypothesizes that good reputation can create labor productivity and efficiency benefits. The purpose of this study is to empirically (...)
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  • Environment, Social, and Governance Performance and Financial Performance With National Pension Fund Investment: Evidence From Korea.Sungjin Son & Jootae Kim - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    This study attempts to examine the relationship between environment, social, and governance management and financial performance and the role of socially responsible investment in the National Pension Fund, Korea’s largest institutional investor. This study tries to provide evidence for the slack resource hypothesis by verifying whether companies with higher financial performance make more efforts to improve ESG performance. In addition, we tried to validate whether NPF is expanding its investments in corporations with high economic performance and high ESG performance. Based (...)
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  • The Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance in the Banking Sector.Maria-Gaia Soana - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):133-148.
    Since the 1970s, many Anglo-American studies have investigated the theme of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its costs and benefits. Most studies have tried to test, largely in samples of multiple industries, the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). These analyses, however, have produced conflicting results and any attempt to give a generalized and coherent conclusion has proved inadequate. This article examines the ways CSP can be proxied and investigates the possible relationship between CSP (measured (...)
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  • Decoupling Among CSR Policies, Programs, and Impacts: An Empirical Study.Hugo Smid & Johan Graafland - 2019 - Business and Society 58 (2):231-267.
    There are relatively few empirical studies on the impacts of corporate social responsibility policies and programs. This article addresses the research gap by analyzing the incidence of, and the conditions that affect, decoupling among CSR policies, implementation of CSR programs, and CSR impacts for various environmental and social issues. Complete decoupling is a condition of full divergence among policies, programs, and impacts amounting to purely ceremonial CSR. Using ratings from a sustainability rating agency on a sample of about 1,000 large (...)
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  • Teaching Business Ethics Through Strategically Integrated Micro-Insertions.Alesia Slocum, Sylvia Rohlfer & Cesar Gonzalez-Canton - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (1):1-14.
    This article identifies an integrated teaching strategy that was originally developed for engineers, the so-called ‘micro-insertion’ approach, as a practical and effective means to teach ethics at business schools. It is argued that instructors can incorporate not only generic or thematic learning objectives for students into this method (i.e., the intended content of what is being taught: in our case, an underlying ethical base for doing business), but also do so via a strategically integrated approach regarding the appropriate mix and (...)
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  • The ethical obligations of institutional investors: Managing moral complexity.Jason Skirry, Katherina Pattit & Harry J. Van Buren - 2022 - Business and Society Review 127 (4):757-778.
    Institutional investors control almost 60% of all assets under management worldwide and encompass a wide variety of organizations. Despite this reach, however, institutional investors have not received the normative scrutiny they merit beyond general discussions around their legally grounded fiduciary obligations to their beneficiaries. This paper offers a discussion of institutional investor ethical obligations in light of their specific attributes. We propose that the different characteristics of institutional investors and the diverse roles they play in the marketplace inform the scope (...)
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  • The link between corporate social and financial performance: Evidence from the banking industry. [REVIEW]W. Gary Simpson & Theodor Kohers - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 35 (2):97 - 109.
    The purpose of this investigation is to extend earlier research on the relationship between corporate social and financial performance. The unique contribution of the study is the empirical analysis of a sample of companies from the banking industry and the use of Community Reinvestment Act ratings as a social performance measure. The empirical analysis solidly supports the hypothesis that the link between social and financial performance is positive.
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  • Value Priorities as Combining Core Factors Between CSR and Reputation – A Qualitative Study.Marjo Elisa Siltaoja - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):91-111.
    This article explores the nature of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate reputation using qualitative research approach. Specifically, the relationship between CSR and corporate reputation is examined from the viewpoint of value theory. This paper brings up for discussion the various value priorities lying in the background of CSR actions. The aim is to form categories of value priorities around CSR and reputation, based on qualitative research approach. The main concepts in this paper – CSR, reputation and value – are (...)
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  • Ethics and Law: Guiding the Invisible Hand to Correct Corporate Social Responsibility Externalities. [REVIEW]Paul K. Shum & Sharon L. Yam - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (4):549 - 571.
    Tokenistic short-term economic success is not good indicia of long-term success. Sustainable business success requires sustained existence in a corporation's political, economic, social, technological, legal and environmental contexts. Far beyond the traditional economic focus, consumers, governments and public interest groups alike increasingly expect the business sector to take on more social and environmental responsibilities. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is the model in which economic, social and environmental responsibilities are fulfilled simultaneously. However, there is insufficient empirical evidence that demonstrates genuine widespread (...)
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  • The Moderating Effect of Cultural Values on the Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Firm Performance.Wei Shi & Kevin Veenstra - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):89-107.
    Using two national culture dimensions, we show that the influence of firms’ corporate social performance on corporate financial performance hinges on culture. Specifically, CFP is higher in those firms where CSR initiatives are congruent with the cultural environment. CSP has a negative impact on CFP for those firms domiciled in countries which are individualistic and favor flexibility. These findings are amplified for those firms with low levels of foreign influence in terms of institutional ownership and sales. Using a dataset covering (...)
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  • Ambition Versus Conscience, Does Corporate Social Responsibility Pay off? The Application of Matching Methods.Chung-Hua Shen & Yuan Chang - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):133 - 153.
    In this article, we examine the effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on firms' financial performance (CSR-effect). Two competing hypotheses, social impact hypothesis and shift of focus hypothesis, are proposed to investigate this issue, where the former suggests that CSR has a positive relation with performance and the latter are opposite. In order to ensure the CSR-effect is not contaminated by other faeton or samples are randomly drawn, we employ four matching methods, Nearest, Caliper, Mahala and Mahala Caliper to match (...)
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  • Corporate Social Performance and Financial Performance: Sample-Selection Issues.Mark P. Sharfman & Ali M. Shahzad - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (6):889-918.
    The vast majority of extant empirical research examining the relationship between corporate social performance and financial performance selects samples of only those firms which are observed engaging in CSP. In this study, the authors assert that firms’ efforts to pursue CSP and subsequently their appearance in social-choice investment advisory firms’ ranking databases are non-random. Studying the CSP–FP link using selected samples of only those firms whose social performance is ranked by SIA firms introduces a sample-selection bias which limits generalization of (...)
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  • On the Validity of Environmental Performance Metrics.Natalia Semenova & Lars G. Hassel - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (2):249-258.
    Different proprietary databases have been used extensively in research to assess the environmental performance and environmental risk of companies. This study explores the convergent validity of the environmental ratings of MSCI ESG STATS, Thomson Reuters ASSET4 and Global Engagement Services. The study shows that the ratings have common dimensions, but on aggregate, they do not converge. On the environmental opportunity side, KLD environmental strengths, and ASSET4 and GES environmental performance metrics correlate highly and provide convergent scores for US companies from (...)
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  • Having, Giving, and Getting: Slack Resources, Corporate Philanthropy, and Firm Financial Performance.Bruce Seifert, Sara A. Morris & Barbara R. Bartkus - 2004 - Business and Society 43 (2):135-161.
    This study investigates financial correlates of corporate philanthropy in Fortune 1000 companies using structural equation modeling. The results suggest that cash flow (one of the most discretionary types of organizational slack) has a significant impact on a firm’s cash donations to charitable causes, but monetary donations do not affect firm financial performance. These findings support the accepted view of corporate philanthropy as a discretionary social responsibility and the traditional thinking about firm giving in the business and society literature—that doing well (...)
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  • Comparing big givers and small givers: Financial correlates of corporate philanthropy. [REVIEW]Bruce Seifert, Sara A. Morris & Barbara R. Bartkus - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):195 - 211.
    In a departure from the traditional studies of corporate philanthropy that focus on board composition, advertising, and social networks, the authors investigate the financial correlates of corporate philanthropy. The research design controls for firm size and industry while observing firms from a variety of industries. The sample contains matched pairs of generous and less generous corporate givers. The authors find, as hypothesized, a positive relationship between a firm''s cash resources available and cash donations, but no significant relationship between corporate philanthropy (...)
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  • Business Cases and Corporate Engagement with Sustainability: Differentiating Ethical Motivations.Stefan Schaltegger & Roger Burritt - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (2):241-259.
    This paper explores links between different ethical motivations and kinds of corporate social responsibility activities to distinguish between different types of business cases with regard to sustainability. The design of CSR and corporate sustainability can be based on different ethical foundations and motivations. This paper draws on the framework of Roberts which distinguishes four different ethical management versions of CSR. The first two ethical motivations are driven either by a reactionary concern for the short-term financial interests of the business, or (...)
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