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  1. Few Women on Boards: What’s Identity Got to Do With It?Lívia Markoczy, Sunny Li Sun & Jigao Zhu - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (2):311-327.
    Drawing on the similarity-attraction perspective and social identity theory, we argue that male versus female interlocking directors are likely to have different experiences when they work alongside female board directors of other firms. The theorized source of such experiences for male interlocking directors is in-group favoritism and/or a social identity threat-related discomfort. Interlocking female directors are theorized to be ambivalent between desiring social support versus experiencing identity threat-based career concerns. These experiences are predicted to motivate male versus female interlocking directors (...)
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  • The Carrot or the Stick: Self-Regulation for Gender-Diverse Boards Via Codes of Good Governance.Heike Mensi-Klarbach, Stephan Leixnering & Michael Schiffinger - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):577-593.
    Scholars have emphasized the potential of self-regulation, realized through ‘codes of good governance’, to improve gender diversity on boards. Yet, unconvinced of the effectiveness of this self-regulation, many regulators have implemented mandatory quota laws. Our study sheds light on this dilemma. Seeking to broaden our conceptual knowledge of how such ‘codes’ work in the specific case of gender diversity on boards, we ask: Under which conditions is self-regulation via voluntary principles of good governance effective? Expanding recent institutional-theory perspectives from the (...)
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  • Toward Gender Diversity on Corporate Boards: Evaluating Government Quotas Versus Shareholder Resolutions From the Perspective of Third Wave Feminism.John Dobson, Denise Hensley & Mahdi Rastad - 2018 - Philosophy of Management 17 (3):333-351.
    In recent years, the US and the EU have pursued markedly different agendas in the pursuit of board gender diversity. The EU has taken a more pro-active governmental approach of mandated quotas, whereas the US is relying largely on the endogenous mechanism of shareholder diversity proposals. Despite their obvious allure as a means of bringing about rapid change, evidence is mounting that board gender diversity quotas may yield various deleterious side effects; and quotas may not be as successful in their (...)
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