Switch to: References

Citations of:

The Moral Foundations of Market Institutions

Integra: The Association for Integrative (1992)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Hypothetical Markets: Educational Application of Ronald Dworkin's Sovereign Virtue.Stephen Gough - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (3):287–299.
    The purpose of this paper is to consider, in principle and at the most general level, a particular possible approach to educational policy‐making. This approach involves an education‐specific application of the notion of hypothetical markets first developed in Ronald Dworkin's book Sovereign Virtue: The theory and practice of equality . The paper distinguishes the concept of the market from the operation of any actual market, and from the operation of ‘market forces’ in any generalised sense. It continues by arguing that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Profit From the Priceless: Heritage Sites, Property Rights and the Duty to Preserve.Kevin Gibson - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (3):327-348.
    ABSTRACTThis article suggests that corporate responsibility should be interpreted to include concern about resources that cannot easily be treated as commodities. Heritage Sites are places of historical and cultural importance. Given the primacy of contingent valuation methods in creating policy, these sites are often at risk from development or tourism since there is pressure to treat them as revenue centers. The article moves to looking at the status of sites in terms of property rights, drawing on Locke's original formulation. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Challenging the Coherence of Social Justice as a Shared Nursing Value.Martin Lipscomb - 2011 - Nursing Philosophy 12 (1):4-11.
    Normative and prescriptive claims regarding social justice are often inadequately developed in the nursing literature and, in consequence, they must be rejected in their current form. Thus, claims regarding social justice are frequently presented as mere assertion or, alternatively, when assertions are supported that support may be weak . This paper challenges the coherence of social justice as a shared nursing value and it is suggested that claims regarding the concept should be tempered.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Retreat From Liberty.Brenda Almond - 1994 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 8 (2):235-246.
    In What's the Matter with Liberalism? Ronald Beiner diagnoses the ills of liberalism along the three broad fronts where it is now widely challenged: its pretensions to moral neutrality; its lack of cultural standards; and its inability to deal with crime, unemployment, family breakdown, homeless‐ness, rampant consumerism, and global environmental and economic problems. But even in its minimalist classical formulation, liberalism entails a substantive moral position, and is committed to resisting the violations of rights that lead to the crises with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Exit, Voice and Values in Economic Institutions.Graham Dawson - 1997 - Economics and Philosophy 13 (1):87-100.
    Are there worthwhile values and ideals which flourish in the procedures of the state but wither in the transactions of the market? Are there equitable and fulfilling social relationships which are nurtured in the economic sphere but crumble in the political world? There is clearly some truth in the claim that at least in certain circumstances market systems inculcate in people not only ‘honesty and diligence, but also sensitivity to the needs and preferences of others’ . On the other hand, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Moralizing Markets.Richard Bellamy - 1994 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 8 (3):341-357.
    The Austrian school tends to associate the morality of the market with its efficient operation. Consequently, it criticizes attempts to offer an ethical evaluation of the market for not understanding how the market works. This criticism proves correct with regard to those who would seek to run an economy according to a set of predetermined moral criteria, such as socialist advocates of central planning or Victorian moralists who regarded the market as the embodiment of the desert ethic. However, if the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark