Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Could There Be a Science of Rationality?Donald Davidson - 1995 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 3 (1):1-16.
  • Colloquium 2.Helen Cartwright - 1990 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1):64-78.
  • Davidson’s Derangement Revisited: Guest Editors’ Introduction.Endre Begby & Bjørn Torgrim Ramberg - 2016 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 59 (1):1-5.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rarely Pure and Never Simple: Tensions in the Theory of Truth.Paul Saka - 2010 - Topoi 29 (2):125-135.
    Section 1 discerns ambiguity in the word “truth”, observing that the term is used most naturally in reference to truth-bearers rather than truth-makers. Focusing on truths-as-truth-bearers, then, it would appear that alethic realism conflicts with metaphysical realism as naturalistically construed. Section 2 discerns ambiguity in the purporting of truth (as in assertion), conjecturing that all expressions, not just those found in traditionally recognized opaque contexts, can be read intensionally (as well, perhaps, as extensionally). For instance, we would not generally want (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Commentary on Groarke.Fred J. Kauffeld - unknown
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conditional Predictions.Stefan Kaufmann - 2005 - Linguistics and Philosophy 28 (2):181 - 231.
    The connection between the probabilities of conditionals and the corresponding conditional probabilities has long been explored in the philosophical literature, but its implementation faces both technical obstacles and objections on empirical grounds. In this paper I ?rst outline the motivation for the probabilistic turn and Lewis’ triviality results, which stand in the way of what would seem to be its most straightforward implementation. I then focus on Richard Jeffrey’s ’random-variable’ approach, which circumvents these problems by giving up the notion that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • A Sketch of Blissful Actions and Democracy Based Upon Rasa.Parthasarathi Banerjee - 2007 - AI and Society 21 (1-2):93-120.
    Contemporary democracy has given primacy to thought. Building up institutions on thought and reasoned discourse excludes out human actions derived not from thought that one thinks. Ordinary life is visited by emotion and passion. Such actions of unknown origin are captured best in the drama. Indian theory and practice of drama and the poetics offer communion between the performer and the viewer. Blissful relish of the actions and the dialogues lift up the banal actions from the ordinary to a state (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Cogitative and Cognitive Speaker Meaning.Wayne A. Davis - 1992 - Philosophical Studies 67 (1):71 - 88.
  • Speaker Meaning.Wayne Davis - 1992 - Linguistics and Philosophy 15 (3):223 - 253.
  • Information-Based Epistemology, Ecological Epistemology and Epistemology Naturalized.Richard E. Grandy - 1987 - Synthese 70 (February):191-203.
    Shannon's notion of information is more useful for naturalized epistemology than Dretske's.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Three Views of Language & the Mind.Submitted May - unknown
    The essay which follows is about the relationship between mind and language. Most recent thought about intentionality has it that (i) mental states of individuals are largely, or in the most fundamental cases, independent of social facts about public languages, and (ii) these social facts are derived from, or constituted by, the mental states of individuals. The purpose of this essay is to challenge this individualist orthodoxy (as well as the view of the relationship between mind and action which often (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Interpretation, Reasons, and Facts.Richard N. Manning - 2003 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):346-376.
    Donald Davidson argues that his interpretivist approach to meaning shows that accounting for the intentionality and objectivity of thought does not require an appeal, as John McDowell has urged it does, to a specifically rational relation between mind and world. Moreover, Davidson claims that the idea of such a relation is unintelligible. This paper takes issue with these claims. It shows, first, that interpretivism, contra Davidson's express view, does not depend essentially upon an appeal to a causal relation between events (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Dire «je».Eros Corazza - 1991 - Dialogue 30 (1-2):51-.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is Davidson a Gricean?John Cook - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (3):557.
    ABSTRACT: In his recent collection of essays, Language, Truth and History, Donald Davidson appears to endorse a philosophy of language which gives primary importance to the notion of the speaker’s communicative intentions, a perspective on language not too dissimilar from that of Paul Grice. If that is right, then this would mark a major shift from the formal semanticist approach articulated and defended by Davidson in his Inquiries into Truth and Interpretation. In this paper, I argue that although there are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Grice’s Analysis of Utterance-Meaning and Cicero’s Catilinarian Apostrophe.Fred J. Kauffeld - 2009 - Argumentation 23 (2):239-257.
    The pragmatics underlying Paul Grice’s analysis of utterance-meaning provide a powerful framework for investigating the commitments arguers undertake. Unfortunately, the complexity of Grice’s analysis has frustrated appropriate reliance on this important facet of his work. By explicating Cicero’s use of apostrophe in his famous “First Catilinarian” this essay attempts to show that a full complex of reflexive gricean speaker intentions in essentially to seriously saying and meaning something.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Paul Grice.Richard E. Grandy - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.