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  1. Dimensions of the Threat to the Self Posed by Deep Brain Stimulation: Personal Identity, Authenticity, and Autonomy.Przemysław Zawadzki - 2020 - Diametros 18 (69):71-98.
    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an invasive therapeutic method involving the implantation of electrodes and the electrical stimulation of specific areas of the brain to modulate their activity. DBS brings therapeutic benefits, but can also have adverse side effects. Recently, neuroethicists have recognized that DBS poses a threat to the very fabric of human existence, namely, to the selves of patients. This article provides a review of the neuroethical literature examining this issue, and identifies the crucial dimensions related to the (...)
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  • A Threat to Autonomy? The Intrusion of Predictive Brain Implants.Frederic Gilbert - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):4-11.
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  • An Instrument to Capture the Phenomenology of Implantable Brain Device Use.Frederic Gilbert, Brown, Dasgupta, Martens, Klein & Goering - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (S3):333-340.
    One important concern regarding implantable Brain Computer Interfaces is the fear that the intervention will negatively change a patient’s sense of identity or agency. In particular, there is concern that the user will be psychologically worse-off following treatment despite postoperative functional improvements. Clinical observations from similar implantable brain technologies, such as deep brain stimulation, show a small but significant proportion of patients report feelings of strangeness or difficulty adjusting to a new concept of themselves characterized by a maladaptive je ne (...)
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  • An Instrument to Capture the Phenomenology of Implantable Brain Device Use.Frederic Gilbert, Brown, Dasgupta, Martens, Klein & Goering - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (3):333-340.
    One important concern regarding implantable Brain Computer Interfaces is the fear that the intervention will negatively change a patient’s sense of identity or agency. In particular, there is concern that the user will be psychologically worse-off following treatment despite postoperative functional improvements. Clinical observations from similar implantable brain technologies, such as deep brain stimulation, show a small but significant proportion of patients report feelings of strangeness or difficulty adjusting to a new concept of themselves characterized by a maladaptive je ne (...)
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  • Ethical Examination of Deep Brain Stimulation’s ‘Last Resort’ Status.Ian Stevens & Frederic Gilbert - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):68-68.
    Deep brain stimulation interventions are novel devices being investigated for the management of severe treatment-resistant psychiatric illnesses. These interventions require the invasive implantation of high-frequency neurostimulatory probes intracranially aiming to provide symptom relief in treatment-resistant disorders including obsessive-compulsive disorder and anorexia nervosa. In the scientific literature, these neurostimulatory interventions are commonly described as reversible and to be used as a last resort option for psychiatric patients. However, the ‘last resort’ status of these interventions is rarely expanded upon. Contrastingly, usages of (...)
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  • Deep Brain Stimulation: Inducing Self-Estrangement.Frederic Gilbert - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (2):157-165.
    Despite growing evidence that a significant number of patients living with Parkison’s disease experience neuropsychiatric changes following Deep Brain Stimulation treatment, the phenomenon remains poorly understood and largely unexplored in the literature. To shed new light on this phenomenon, we used qualitative methods grounded in phenomenology to conduct in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 17 patients living with Parkinson’s Disease who had undergone DBS. Our study found that patients appear to experience postoperative DBS-induced changes in the form of self-estrangement. Using the insights (...)
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  • Print Me an Organ? Ethical and Regulatory Issues Emerging From 3D Bioprinting in Medicine.Frederic Gilbert, Cathal D. O’Connell, Tajanka Mladenovska & Susan Dodds - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):73-91.
    Recent developments of three-dimensional printing of biomaterials in medicine have been portrayed as demonstrating the potential to transform some medical treatments, including providing new responses to organ damage or organ failure. However, beyond the hype and before 3D bioprinted organs are ready to be transplanted into humans, several important ethical concerns and regulatory questions need to be addressed. This article starts by raising general ethical concerns associated with the use of bioprinting in medicine, then it focuses on more particular ethical (...)
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  • Embodiment and Estrangement: Results From a First-in-Human “Intelligent BCI” Trial.F. Gilbert, M. Cook, T. O’Brien & J. Illes - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (1):83-96.
    While new generations of implantable brain computer interface devices are being developed, evidence in the literature about their impact on the patient experience is lagging. In this article, we address this knowledge gap by analysing data from the first-in-human clinical trial to study patients with implanted BCI advisory devices. We explored perceptions of self-change across six patients who volunteered to be implanted with artificially intelligent BCI devices. We used qualitative methodological tools grounded in phenomenology to conduct in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Results (...)
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  • Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression: Postoperative Feelings of Self-Estrangement, Suicide Attempt and Impulsive–Aggressive Behaviours.Frederic Gilbert - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):473-481.
    The goal of this article is to shed light on Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) postoperative suicidality risk factors within Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD) patients, in particular by focusing on the ethical concern of enrolling patient with history of self-estrangement, suicide attempts and impulsive–aggressive inclinations. In order to illustrate these ethical issues we report and review a clinical case associated with postoperative feelings of self-estrangement, self-harm behaviours and suicide attempt leading to the removal of DBS devices. Could prospectively identifying and excluding (...)
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  • Thinking Ahead Too Much: Speculative Ethics and Implantable Brain Devices.Frederic Gilbert & Eliza Goddard - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (1):49-51.
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  • Acquired Pedophilia and Moral Responsibility.Frederic Gilbert, Andrej Vranic & John Noel M. Viaña - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (4):209-211.
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  • Patients’ Beliefs About Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment-Resistant Depression.Ryan E. Lawrence, Catharine R. Kaufmann, Ravi B. DeSilva & Paul S. Appelbaum - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (4):210-218.
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  • Self-Estrangement & Deep Brain Stimulation: Ethical Issues Related to Forced Explantation.Frederic Gilbert - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (2):107-114.
    Although being generally safe, the use of Deep Brain Stimulation has been associated with a significant number of patients experiencing postoperative psychological and neurological harm within experimental trials. A proportion of these postoperative severe adverse effects have lead to the decision to medically prescribe device deactivation or removal. However, there is little debate in the literature as to what is in the patient’s best interest when device removal has been prescribed; in particular, what should be the conceptual approach to ethically (...)
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  • Controlling Brain Cells With Light: Ethical Considerations for Optogenetic Clinical Trials.Frederic Gilbert, Alexander R. Harris & Robert M. I. Kapsa - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (3):3-11.
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  • How to Turn Ethical Neglect Into Ethical Approval.Frédéric Gilbert & Susan Dodds - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (2):59-60.
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  • Managing Suicide Risk in Experimental Treatments of Treatment-Resistant Depression.Adrian Carter & Wayne Hall - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):38-39.
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  • I Miss Being Me: Phenomenological Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation.Frederic Gilbert, Eliza Goddard, John Noel M. Viaña, Adrian Carter & Malcolm Horne - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):96-109.
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  • Decoded Neurofeedback: Eligibility, Applicability, and Reliability Issues for Use in Schizophrenia and Major Depressive Disorder.John Noel M. Viaña, Lorena Freitas, Mario Carlo Severo & Frederic Gilbert - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (2):127-129.
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  • Just Another Spot? How to Miss the Ethical Target.Frederic Gilbert - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (4):85-87.
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  • Time to Reconsider Deep Brain Stimulation.Ron Berghmans - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):36-37.
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  • Deep Brain Stimulation Research Protocols and Depressive Patients with Previous Suicidality: We Can't Afford to Lose Focus.Andrew Coulter - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):41-42.
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  • The Complexity of Deep Brain Stimulation and Suicidality in Patients with Treatment Resistant Depression.Brian S. Appleby - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):39-40.
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  • The Ethical Import of Patient Selection.Samantha Copeland - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):42-43.
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