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  1. Committing Crimes with BCIs: How Brain-Computer Interface Users Can Satisfy Actus Reus and Be Criminally Responsible.Kramer Thompson - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (S3):311-322.
    Brain-computer interfaces allow agents to control computers without moving their bodies. The agents imagine certain things and the brain-computer interfaces read the concomitant neural activity and operate the computer accordingly. But the use of brain-computer interfaces is problematic for criminal law, which requires that someone can only be found criminally responsible if they have satisfied the actus reus requirement: that the agent has performed some (suitably specified) conduct. Agents who affect the world using brain-computer interfaces do not obviously perform any (...)
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  • Bodily Felt Freedom: an Ethical Perspective on Positive Aspects of Deep Brain Stimulation.Julia Sophia Voigt - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (1):45-57.
    The critical aspects of deep brain stimulation are usually the focus of the ethical debate about the implantation of electrodes into the brain of patients with Parkinson’s disease. Above all, potential postoperative side effects on personality caused by DBS mark the debate. However, rehabilitation of agility and mobility by DBS can be posited against critical aspects. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to emphasize the hitherto neglected positive aspects of that technology. A detailed study of the rehabilitation of controlled (...)
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  • Pattern Theory of Self and Situating Moral Aspects: The Need to Include Authenticity, Autonomy and Responsibility in Understanding the Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation.Przemysław Zawadzki - 2022 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 21 (3):559-582.
    The aims of this paper are to: identify the best framework for comprehending multidimensional impact of deep brain stimulation on the self; identify weaknesses of this framework; propose refinements to it; in pursuing, show why and how this framework should be extended with additional moral aspects and demonstrate their interrelations; define how moral aspects relate to the framework; show the potential consequences of including moral aspects on evaluating DBS’s impact on patients’ selves. Regarding, I argue that the pattern theory of (...)
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  • Moral Enhancement Durch Neurochirurgie? Machbarkeit Und Ethische VertretbarkeitMoral Enhancement Through Neurosurgery? Feasibility and Ethical Justifiability.Sabine Müller - 2018 - Ethik in der Medizin 30 (1):39-56.
    ZusammenfassungMoral Enhancement wird von einer Reihe einflussreicher Bioethiker propagiert, zum Teil mit dem Anspruch, dass nur dadurch die Menschheit vor ihrem selbstverschuldeten Untergang zu retten sei. Nachdem begründete Zweifel an der Eignung der zum Moral Enhancement vorgeschlagenen Psychopharmaka aufgekommen sind, wurden neurochirurgische Interventionen, insbesondere die Tiefe Hirnstimulation, vorgeschlagen. Diese Ad-hoc-Vorschläge stützen sich auf eine Handvoll neurochirurgischer Eingriffe an geistig schwer behinderten Menschen sowie die Psychochirurgie des letzten Jahrhunderts. In diesem Aufsatz geht es erstens um die Frage, ob Moral Enhancement durch (...)
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  • Neuroethics.Adina Roskies - 2016 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • A Meta-Science for a Global Bioethics and Biomedicine.David S. Basser - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12:9.
    BackgroundAs suggested by Shook and Giordano, understanding and therefore addressing the urgent international governance issues around globalizing bio-medical/technology research and applications is limited by the perception of the underlying science.MethodsA philosophical methodology is used, based on novel and classical philosophical reflection upon existent literature, clinical wisdoms and narrative theory to discover a meta-science and telos of humankind for the development of a relevant and defendable global biomedical bioethics.ResultsIn this article, through pondering an integrative systems approach, I propose a biomedical model (...)
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  • Dimensions of the Threat to the Self Posed by Deep Brain Stimulation: Personal Identity, Authenticity, and Autonomy.Przemysław Zawadzki - 2020 - Diametros 18 (69):71-98.
    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an invasive therapeutic method involving the implantation of electrodes and the electrical stimulation of specific areas of the brain to modulate their activity. DBS brings therapeutic benefits, but can also have adverse side effects. Recently, neuroethicists have recognized that DBS poses a threat to the very fabric of human existence, namely, to the selves of patients. This article provides a review of the neuroethical literature examining this issue, and identifies the crucial dimensions related to the (...)
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  • On the Use and Abuse of Phenomenological Methodology in Neuroscience and Bioethics.David Marcelo Peña-Guzmán - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):28-30.
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  • Predictive Brain Implants Are Unlikely to Decrease Patients' Autonomy.David Trafimow - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):22-24.
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  • Closed-Loop Brain Devices in Offender Rehabilitation: Autonomy, Human Rights, and Accountability.Sjors Ligthart, Tijs Kooijmans, Thomas Douglas & Gerben Meynen - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (4):669-680.
    The current debate on closed-loop brain devices (CBDs) focuses on their use in a medical context; possible criminal justice applications have not received scholarly attention. Unlike in medicine, in criminal justice, CBDs might be offered on behalf of the State and for the purpose of protecting security, rather than realising healthcare aims. It would be possible to deploy CBDs in the rehabilitation of convicted offenders, similarly to the much-debated possibility of employing other brain interventions in this context. Although such use (...)
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  • Driving a Wedge Between Self-Control and Self-Ownership.David Wasserman - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):42-44.
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  • DBS and Autonomy: Clarifying the Role of Theoretical Neuroethics.Peter Zuk & Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (1):83-93.
    In this article, we sketch how theoretical neuroethics can clarify the concept of autonomy. We hope that this can both serve as a model for the conceptual clarification of other components of PIAAAS and contribute to the development of the empirical measures that Gilbert and colleagues [1] propose.
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  • Brain-Computer Interfaces and the Translation of Thought into Action.Tom Buller - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (2):155-165.
    A brain-computer interface designed to restore motor function detects neural activity related to intended movement and thereby enables a person to control an external device, for example, a robotic limb, or even their own body. It would seem legitimate, therefore, to describe a BCI as a system that translates thought into action. This paper argues that present BCI-mediated behavior fails to meet the conditions of intentional physical action as proposed by causal and non-causal theories of action. First, according to the (...)
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  • DBS and Autonomy: Clarifying the Role of Theoretical Neuroethics.Peter Zuk & Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (1):83-93.
    In this article, we sketch how theoretical neuroethics can clarify the concept of autonomy. We hope that this can both serve as a model for the conceptual clarification of other components of PIAAAS and contribute to the development of the empirical measures that Gilbert and colleagues [1] propose.
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  • Fostering the Trustworthiness of Researchers: SPECS and the Role of Ethical Reflexivity in Novel Neurotechnology Research.Paul Tubig & Darcy McCusker - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):143-161.
    The development of novel neurotechnologies, such as brain-computer interface and deep-brain stimulation, are very promising in improving the welfare and life prospects many people. These include life-changing therapies for medical conditions and enhancements of cognitive, emotional, and moral capacities. Yet there are also numerous moral risks and uncertainties involved in developing novel neurotechnologies. For this reason, the progress of novel neurotechnology research requires that diverse publics place trust in researchers to develop neural interfaces in ways that are overall beneficial to (...)
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  • An Instrument to Capture the Phenomenology of Implantable Brain Device Use.Frederic Gilbert, Brown, Dasgupta, Martens, Klein & Goering - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (S3):333-340.
    One important concern regarding implantable Brain Computer Interfaces is the fear that the intervention will negatively change a patient’s sense of identity or agency. In particular, there is concern that the user will be psychologically worse-off following treatment despite postoperative functional improvements. Clinical observations from similar implantable brain technologies, such as deep brain stimulation, show a small but significant proportion of patients report feelings of strangeness or difficulty adjusting to a new concept of themselves characterized by a maladaptive je ne (...)
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  • An Instrument to Capture the Phenomenology of Implantable Brain Device Use.Frederic Gilbert, Brown, Dasgupta, Martens, Klein & Goering - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (3):333-340.
    One important concern regarding implantable Brain Computer Interfaces is the fear that the intervention will negatively change a patient’s sense of identity or agency. In particular, there is concern that the user will be psychologically worse-off following treatment despite postoperative functional improvements. Clinical observations from similar implantable brain technologies, such as deep brain stimulation, show a small but significant proportion of patients report feelings of strangeness or difficulty adjusting to a new concept of themselves characterized by a maladaptive je ne (...)
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  • Do Predictive Brain Implants Threaten Patient's Autonomy or Authenticity?Eldar Sarajlic - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):30-32.
    The development of predictive brain implant (PBI) technology that is able to forecast specific neuronal events and advise and/or automatically administer appropriate therapy for diseases of the brain raises a number of ethical issues. Provided that this technology satisfies basic safety and functionality conditions, one of the most pressing questions to address is its relation to the autonomy of patients. As Frederic Gilbert in his article asks, if autonomy implies a certain idea of freedom, or self-government, how can an individual (...)
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  • Deflating the “DBS Causes Personality Changes” Bubble.Frederic Gilbert, J. N. M. Viaña & C. Ineichen - 2018 - Neuroethics 14 (Suppl 1):1-17.
    The idea that deep brain stimulation induces changes to personality, identity, agency, authenticity, autonomy and self is so deeply entrenched within neuroethics discourses that it has become an unchallenged narrative. In this article, we critically assess evidence about putative effects of DBS on PIAAAS. We conducted a literature review of more than 1535 articles to investigate the prevalence of scientific evidence regarding these potential DBS-induced changes. While we observed an increase in the number of publications in theoretical neuroethics that mention (...)
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  • Narrative Devices: Neurotechnologies, Information, and Self-Constitution.Emily Postan - 2020 - Neuroethics 14 (2):231-251.
    This article provides a conceptual and normative framework through which we may understand the potentially ethically significant roles that information generated by neurotechnologies about our brains and minds may play in our construction of our identities. Neuroethics debates currently focus disproportionately on the ways that third parties may use these kinds of information. These debates occlude interests we may have in whether and how we ourselves encounter information about our own brains and minds. This gap is not yet adequately addressed (...)
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  • Ethical Implications of Closed Loop Brain Device: 10-Year Review.Swati Aggarwal & Nupur Chugh - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (1):145-170.
    Closed Loop medical devices such as Closed Loop Deep Brain Stimulation and Brain Computer Interface are some of the emerging neurotechnologies. New generations of implantable brain–computer interfaces have recently gained success in human clinical trials. These implants detect specific neuronal patterns and provide the subject with information to respond to these patterns. Further, Closed Loop brain devices give control to the subject so that he can respond and decide on a therapeutic goal. Although the implants have improved subjects’ quality of (...)
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  • Big Brain Data: On the Responsible Use of Brain Data from Clinical and Consumer-Directed Neurotechnological Devices.Philipp Kellmeyer - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (1):83-98.
    The focus of this paper are the ethical, legal and social challenges for ensuring the responsible use of “big brain data”—the recording, collection and analysis of individuals’ brain data on a large scale with clinical and consumer-directed neurotechnological devices. First, I highlight the benefits of big data and machine learning analytics in neuroscience for basic and translational research. Then, I describe some of the technological, social and psychological barriers for securing brain data from unwarranted access. In this context, I then (...)
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  • Deep Brain Stimulation: Inducing Self-Estrangement.Frederic Gilbert - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (2):157-165.
    Despite growing evidence that a significant number of patients living with Parkison’s disease experience neuropsychiatric changes following Deep Brain Stimulation treatment, the phenomenon remains poorly understood and largely unexplored in the literature. To shed new light on this phenomenon, we used qualitative methods grounded in phenomenology to conduct in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 17 patients living with Parkinson’s Disease who had undergone DBS. Our study found that patients appear to experience postoperative DBS-induced changes in the form of self-estrangement. Using the insights (...)
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  • Print Me an Organ? Ethical and Regulatory Issues Emerging From 3D Bioprinting in Medicine.Frederic Gilbert, Cathal D. O’Connell, Tajanka Mladenovska & Susan Dodds - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):73-91.
    Recent developments of three-dimensional printing of biomaterials in medicine have been portrayed as demonstrating the potential to transform some medical treatments, including providing new responses to organ damage or organ failure. However, beyond the hype and before 3D bioprinted organs are ready to be transplanted into humans, several important ethical concerns and regulatory questions need to be addressed. This article starts by raising general ethical concerns associated with the use of bioprinting in medicine, then it focuses on more particular ethical (...)
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  • Mapping the Dimensions of Agency.Andreas Schönau, Ishan Dasgupta, Timothy Brown, Erika Versalovic, Eran Klein & Sara Goering - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (2-3):172-186.
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  • Are Brain-Computer Interface Devices a Form of Internal Coercion?Eran Klein - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):32-34.
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  • Epilepsy, Decisional Vulnerability, and the Nature of Predictive Brain Implants.César Palacios-González - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):18-19.
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  • Embodiment and Estrangement: Results From a First-in-Human “Intelligent BCI” Trial.F. Gilbert, M. Cook, T. O’Brien & J. Illes - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (1):83-96.
    While new generations of implantable brain computer interface devices are being developed, evidence in the literature about their impact on the patient experience is lagging. In this article, we address this knowledge gap by analysing data from the first-in-human clinical trial to study patients with implanted BCI advisory devices. We explored perceptions of self-change across six patients who volunteered to be implanted with artificially intelligent BCI devices. We used qualitative methodological tools grounded in phenomenology to conduct in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Results (...)
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  • Trusting Oneself and Others: Relational Vulnerability and DBS for Depression.Hannah Skye Martens & Timothy Emmanuel Brown - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (4):226-227.
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  • Mind Reading and Writing: The Future of Neurotechnology.Pieter R. Roelfsema, Damiaan Denys & P. Christiaan Klink - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (7):598-610.
  • Predictive Brain Devices, Therapeutic Activation Systems, and Aggression.Jesper Ryberg - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):36-38.
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  • What Can We Do for You? The Role of Ethics Experts in Neuroscience.Tobias Hainz & Norbert W. Paul - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (1):15-17.
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  • Brain Implants as Closed-Loop Systems: Risks and Opportunities.Jordan Amadio & Nicholas M. Boulis - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):14-15.
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  • Comparison of Philosophical Concerns Between Professionals and the Public Regarding Two Psychiatric Treatments.Laura Yenisa Cabrera, Marisa Brandt, Rachel McKenzie & Robyn Bluhm - forthcoming - Ajob Empirical Bioethics:1-15.
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  • Beyond the Technology: Attribution and Agency in Treatments for Mental Disorders.Laura Y. Cabrera, Rachel McKenzie & Robyn Bluhm - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):92-94.
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  • Staying in the Loop: Relational Agency and Identity in Next-Generation DBS for Psychiatry.Sara Goering, Eran Klein, Darin D. Dougherty & Alik S. Widge - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):59-70.
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  • I Miss Being Me: Phenomenological Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation.Frederic Gilbert, Eliza Goddard, John Noel M. Viaña, Adrian Carter & Malcolm Horne - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (2):96-109.
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  • Deep Brain Stimulation, Autonomy, and Harm.Dale Murray - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):34-36.
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  • Do Implanted Brain Devices Threaten Autonomy or the “Sense” of Autonomy?Laura Specker Sullivan - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):24-26.
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  • Conditions for Consent to the Use of Neurotechnology: A Preparatory Neuroethical Approach to Risk Assessment and Reduction.James Giordano - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):12-14.
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  • Legal and Social Implications of Predictive Brain Machine Interfaces: Duty of Care, Negligence, and Criminal Responsibility.Sharon Nakar, Sara Weinberger & Dov Greenbaum - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):40-42.
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  • Ethical Analyses of Predictive Brain Implants Should Be Consistent With Feminist Interpretations of Autonomy.G. K. D. Crozier & Timothy M. Krahn - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):48-49.
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  • Moving Beyond Concerns of Autonomy.Gavin G. Enck - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):26-28.
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  • Stimulating Autonomy: DBS and the Prospect of Choosing to Control Ourselves Through Stimulation.Sara Goering - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (4):1-3.
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  • The Effects of Closed-Loop Brain Implants on Autonomy and Deliberation: What Are the Risks of Being Kept in the Loop?Frederic Gilbert, Terence O’Brien & Mark Cook - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (2):316-325.
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