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  1. The Balance Between Providing Support, Prolonging Suffering, and Promoting Death: Ethical Issues Surrounding Psychological Treatment of a Terminally Ill Client.Rachel Winograd - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (1):44 - 59.
    A psychologist with a client who is terminally ill and wishes to discuss end-of-life options, specifically the option of hastening death, is faced with an ethical dilemma as to how to proceed with treatment. Specifically, he or she is bound by the American Psychological Association's (2002) potentially conflicting Principles A and E, which advise a psychologist to ?do no harm? as well as ?respect ? self-determination.? In addition, Standard 4 (Privacy and Confidentiality) mandates that a client's personal information is to (...)
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  • Nurses’ attitudes towards euthanasia in conflict with professional ethical guidelines.Anja Terkamo-Moisio, Tarja Kvist, Mari Kangasniemi, Teuvo Laitila, Olli-Pekka Ryynänen & Anna-Maija Pietilä - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (1):70-86.
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  • Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Intended Actions Toward Patient-Directed Dying.Jessica Jannette, Marcia Sue DeWolf Bosek & Betty Rambur - 2013 - Jona’s Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 15 (2):80-88.
  • The operationalisation of religion and world view in surveys of nurses' attitudes toward euthanasia and assisted suicide.Joris Gielen, Stef Van den Branden & Bert Broeckaert - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):423-431.
    Most quantitative studies that survey nurses’ attitudes toward euthanasia and/or assisted suicide, also attempt to assess the influence of religion on these attitudes. We wanted to evaluate the operationalisation of religion and world view in these surveys. In the Pubmed database we searched for relevant articles published before August 2008 using combinations of search terms. Twenty-eight relevant articles were found. In five surveys nurses were directly asked whether religious beliefs, religious practices and/or ideological convictions influenced their attitudes, or the respondents (...)
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  • Flemish palliative-care nurses' attitudes to palliative sedation: A quantitative study.J. Gielen, S. Van den Branden, T. Van Iersel & B. Broeckaert - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (5):692-704.
    Palliative sedation is an option of last resort to control refractory suffering. In order to better understand palliative-care nurses’ attitudes to palliative sedation, an anonymous questionnaire was sent to all nurses (589) employed in palliative care in Flanders (Belgium). In all, 70.5% of the nurses (n = 415) responded. A large majority did not agree that euthanasia is preferable to palliative sedation, were against non-voluntary euthanasia in the case of a deeply and continuously sedated patient and considered it generally better (...)
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  • Nurses’ moral experiences of assisted death: A meta-synthesis of qualitative research.James Elmore, David Kenneth Wright & Maude Paradis - 2018 - Nursing Ethics 25 (8):955-972.
    Background: Legislative changes are resulting in assisted death as an option for people at the end of life. Although nurses’ experiences and perspectives are underrepresented within broader ethical discourses about assisted death, there is a small but significant body of literature examining nurses’ experiences of caring for people who request this option. Aim: To synthesize what has been learned about nurses’ experiences of caring for patients who request assisted death and to highlight what is morally at stake for nurses who (...)
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  • Can physicians conceive of performing euthanasia in case of psychiatric disease, dementia or being tired of living?Eva Elizabeth Bolt, Marianne C. Snijdewind, Dick L. Willems, Agnes van der Heide & Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):592-598.
  • Orthodox Jewish perspectives on withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment.Goedele Baeke, Jean-Pierre Wils & Bert Broeckaert - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (6):835-846.
    The Jewish religious tradition summons its adherents to save life. For religious Jews preservation of life is the ultimate religious commandment. At the same time Jewish law recognizes that the agony of a moribund person may not be stretched. When the time to die has come this has to be respected. The process of dying should not needlessly be prolonged. We discuss the position of two prominent Orthodox Jewish authorities – the late Rabbi Moshe Feinstein and Rabbi J David Bleich (...)
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  • Nurses attitudes towards death, dying patients and euthanasia: A descriptive study.Melike Ayça Ay & Fatma Öz - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (5):1442-1457.
    Background:Attitudes of nurses towards death and related concepts influence end-of-life care. Determining nurses’ views and attitudes towards these concepts and the factors that affect them are necessary to ensure quality end-of-life care.Objectives:The purpose of this study was to determine nurses’ views and attitudes about death, dying patient, euthanasia and the relationships between nurses’ characteristics.Methods:Participants consist of the nurses who volunteered to take part in this descriptive study from 25 hospitals which has a paediatric or adult intensive care unit and located (...)
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