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  1. Mr2729665 (2012b: 68075) 68q05.Edwin J. Beggs, José Félix Costa & John V. Tucker - 2010 - Studia Logica 95 (1-2):279-300.
    Earlier, we have studied computations possible by physical systems and by algorithms combined with physical systems. In particular, we have analysed the idea of using an experiment as an oracle to an abstract computational device, such as the Turing machine. The theory of composite machines of this kind can be used to understand a Turing machine receiving extra computational power from a physical process, or an experimenter modelled as a Turing machine performing a test of a known physical theory T.Our (...)
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  • Quantum Hypercomputation.Tien D. Kieu - 2002 - Minds and Machines 12 (4):541-561.
    We explore the possibility of using quantum mechanical principles for hypercomputation through the consideration of a quantum algorithm for computing the Turing halting problem. The mathematical noncomputability is compensated by the measurability of the values of quantum observables and of the probability distributions for these values. Some previous no-go claims against quantum hypercomputation are then reviewed in the light of this new positive proposal.
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  • Beyond the Universal Turing Machine.B. Jack Copeland & Richard Sylvan - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (1):46-66.
  • Physics of Brain-Mind Interaction.John C. Eccles - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):662-663.
  • The Broad Conception of Computation.Jack Copeland - 1997 - American Behavioral Scientist 40 (6):690-716.
    A myth has arisen concerning Turing's paper of 1936, namely that Turing set forth a fundamental principle concerning the limits of what can be computed by machine - a myth that has passed into cognitive science and the philosophy of mind, to wide and pernicious effect. This supposed principle, sometimes incorrectly termed the 'Church-Turing thesis', is the claim that the class of functions that can be computed by machines is identical to the class of functions that can be computed by (...)
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  • Turing's o-Machines, Searle, Penrose, and the Brain.Jack Copeland - 1998 - Analysis 58 (2):128-138.
    In his PhD thesis (1938) Turing introduced what he described as 'a new kind of machine'. He called these 'O-machines'. The present paper employs Turing's concept against a number of currently fashionable positions in the philosophy of mind.
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  • Computing the Thinkable.David J. Chalmers - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):658-659.
  • Counterfactuals and Scientific Realism.Michael J. Shaffer - 2012 - London and Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan.
    This book is a sustained defense of the compatibility of the presence of idealizations in the sciences and scientific realism. So, the book is essentially a detailed response to the infamous arguments raised by Nancy Cartwright to the effect that idealization and scientific realism are incompatible.
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  • On a Possibly Pure Set-Theoretic Contribution to Black Hole Entropy.Gábor Etesi - 2020 - Foundations of Science 25 (2):327-340.
    Continuity as appears to us immediately by intuition differs from its current formalization, the arithmetical continuum or equivalently the set of real numbers used in modern mathematical analysis. Motivated by the known mathematical and physical problems arising from this formalization of the continuum, our aim in this paper is twofold. Firstly, by interpreting Chaitin’s variant of Gödel’s first incompleteness theorem as an inherent uncertainty or fuzziness of the arithmetical continuum, a formal set-theoretic entropy is assigned to the arithmetical continuum. Secondly, (...)
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  • Zwischen Berechenbarkeit Und Nichtberechenbarkeit. Die Thematisierung der Berechenbarkeit in der Aktuellen Physik Komplexer Systeme.Jan C. Schmidt - 2003 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 34 (1):99-131.
    Between Calculability and Non-Calculability. Issues of Calculability and Predictability in the Physics of Complex Systems. The ability to predict has been a very important qualifier of what constitutes scientific knowledge, ever since the successes of Babylonian and Greek astronomy. More recent is the general appreciation of the fact that in the presence of deterministic chaos, predictability is severely limited : Nearby trajectories diverge during time evolution; small errors typically grow exponentially with time. The system obeys deterministic laws and still is (...)
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  • hacia una filosofía de la ciencia centrada en prácticas.Sergio F. Martinez - 2015 - Mexico: UNAM-Bonilla Artigas.
  • How to Make a Meaningful Comparison of Models: The Church–Turing Thesis Over the Reals.Maël Pégny - 2016 - Minds and Machines 26 (4):359-388.
    It is commonly believed that there is no equivalent of the Church–Turing thesis for computation over the reals. In particular, computational models on this domain do not exhibit the convergence of formalisms that supports this thesis in the case of integer computation. In the light of recent philosophical developments on the different meanings of the Church–Turing thesis, and recent technical results on analog computation, I will show that this current belief confounds two distinct issues, namely the extension of the notion (...)
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  • Is the Church-Turing Thesis True?Carol E. Cleland - 1993 - Minds and Machines 3 (3):283-312.
    The Church-Turing thesis makes a bold claim about the theoretical limits to computation. It is based upon independent analyses of the general notion of an effective procedure proposed by Alan Turing and Alonzo Church in the 1930''s. As originally construed, the thesis applied only to the number theoretic functions; it amounted to the claim that there were no number theoretic functions which couldn''t be computed by a Turing machine but could be computed by means of some other kind of effective (...)
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  • Is the Human Mind a Turing Machine?D. King - 1996 - Synthese 108 (3):379-89.
    In this paper I discuss the topics of mechanism and algorithmicity. I emphasise that a characterisation of algorithmicity such as the Turing machine is iterative; and I argue that if the human mind can solve problems that no Turing machine can, the mind must depend on some non-iterative principle — in fact, Cantor's second principle of generation, a principle of the actual infinite rather than the potential infinite of Turing machines. But as there has been theorisation that all physical systems (...)
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  • Universe Creation on a Computer.Gordon McCabe - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (4):591-625.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of the epistemology and metaphysics of universe creation on a computer. The paper begins with F.J.Tipler's argument that our experience is indistinguishable from the experience of someone embedded in a perfect computer simulation of our own universe, hence we cannot know whether or not we are part of such a computer program ourselves. Tipler's argument is treated as a special case of epistemological scepticism, in a similar vein to `brain-in-a-vat' arguments. (...)
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  • Bayesian Confirmation of Theories That Incorporate Idealizations.Michael J. Shaffer - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (1):36-52.
    Following Nancy Cartwright and others, I suggest that most (if not all) theories incorporate, or depend on, one or more idealizing assumptions. I then argue that such theories ought to be regimented as counterfactuals, the antecedents of which are simplifying assumptions. If this account of the logic form of theories is granted, then a serious problem arises for Bayesians concerning the prior probabilities of theories that have counterfactual form. If no such probabilities can be assigned, the the posterior probabilities will (...)
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  • Review of Language in the World. A Philosophical Enquiry. Max J. Cresswell. [REVIEW]Josefa Toribio - 1996 - Philosophical Psychology 9 (1):111-140.
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  • Mind and Supermind? Keith Frankish. [REVIEW]Josefa Toribio - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):139-142.
    This is a review of Mind and Supermind. By KEITH FRANKISH. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp xiv + 255. Price £45.00 (US $75.00). ISBN 0521 812038 (hardback).
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  • Hypercomputation and the Physical Church‐Turing Thesis.Paolo Cotogno - 2003 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):181-223.
    A version of the Church-Turing Thesis states that every effectively realizable physical system can be simulated by Turing Machines (‘Thesis P’). In this formulation the Thesis appears to be an empirical hypothesis, subject to physical falsification. We review the main approaches to computation beyond Turing definability (‘hypercomputation’): supertask, non-well-founded, analog, quantum, and retrocausal computation. The conclusions are that these models reduce to supertasks, i.e. infinite computation, and that even supertasks are no solution for recursive incomputability. This yields that the realization (...)
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  • Turing's O-Machines, Searle, Penrose and the Brain.B. J. Copeland - 1998 - Analysis 58 (2):128-138.
  • Beyond the Universal Turing Machine.Jack Copeland - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (1):46-67.
    We describe an emerging field, that of nonclassical computability and nonclassical computing machinery. According to the nonclassicist, the set of well-defined computations is not exhausted by the computations that can be carried out by a Turing machine. We provide an overview of the field and a philosophical defence of its foundations.
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  • Effective Physical Processes and Active Information in Quantum Computing.Ignazio Licata - 2007 - Quantum Biosystems 1 (1):51-65.
    The recent debate on hypercomputation has raised new questions both on the computational abilities of quantum systems and the Church-Turing Thesis role in Physics.We propose here the idea of “effective physical process” as the essentially physical notion of computation. By using the Bohm and Hiley active information concept we analyze the differences between the standard form (quantum gates) and the non-standard one (adiabatic and morphogenetic) of Quantum Computing, and we point out how its Super-Turing potentialities derive from an incomputable information (...)
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  • A Física da Terminação.José Félix Costa - 2016 - Kairos 16 (1):14-60.
    Sumário Mostramos que, em virtude dos limites teóricos da computação, nem toda a ciência formulada com carácter preditivo pode ser simulada. Em particular, evidencia- se que a Fisica Clássica, nomeadamente a Físíca Newtoniana, padece deste mal, encerrando processos de Zenão.
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  • The Non-Unique Universe.Gordon McCabe - 2010 - Foundations of Physics 40 (6):629-637.
    The purpose of this paper is to elucidate, by means of concepts and theorems drawn from mathematical logic, the conditions under which the existence of a multiverse is a logical necessity in mathematical physics, and the implications of Gödel’s incompleteness theorem for theories of everything.Three conclusions are obtained in the final section: (i) the theory of the structure of our universe might be an undecidable theory, and this constitutes a potential epistemological limit for mathematical physics, but because such a theory (...)
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  • Physical Oracles: The Turing Machine and the Wheatstone Bridge.Edwin J. Beggs, José Félix Costa & John V. Tucker - 2010 - Studia Logica 95 (1-2):279-300.
    Earlier, we have studied computations possible by physical systems and by algorithms combined with physical systems. In particular, we have analysed the idea of using an experiment as an oracle to an abstract computational device, such as the Turing machine. The theory of composite machines of this kind can be used to understand (a) a Turing machine receiving extra computational power from a physical process, or (b) an experimenter modelled as a Turing machine performing a test of a known physical (...)
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  • Is Mathematical Insight Algorithmic?Martin Davis - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):659-660.
  • Three Forms of Physical Measurement and Their Computability.Edwin Beggs, José Félix Costa & John V. Tucker - 2014 - Review of Symbolic Logic 7 (4):618-646.
    We have begun a theory of measurement in which an experimenter and his or her experimental procedure are modeled by algorithms that interact with physical equipment through a simple abstract interface. The theory is based upon using models of physical equipment as oracles to Turing machines. This allows us to investigate the computability and computational complexity of measurement processes. We examine eight different experiments that make measurements and, by introducing the idea of an observable indicator, we identify three distinct forms (...)
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  • The Nonalgorithmic Mind.Roger Penrose - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):692-705.
  • Computability, Consciousness, and Algorithms.Robert Wilensky - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):690-691.
  • Minds Beyond Brains and Algorithms.Jan M. Zytkow - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):691-692.
  • Penrose's Grand Unified Mystery.David Waltz & James Pustejovsky - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):688-690.
  • Exactly Which Emperor is Penrose Talking About?John K. Tsotsos - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):686-687.
  • Between Turing and Quantum Mechanics There is Body to Be Found.Francisco J. Varela - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):687-688.
  • The Thinker Dreams of Being an Emperor.M. M. Taylor - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):685-686.
  • The Pretender's New Clothes.Tim Smithers - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):683-684.
  • And Then a Miracle Happens….Keith E. Stanovich - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):684-685.
  • Seeing Truth or Just Seeming True?Adina Roskies - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):682-683.
  • The Emperor's Old Hat.Don Perlis - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):680-681.
  • Systematic, Unconscious Thought is the Place to Anchor Quantum Mechanics in the Mind.Thomas Roeper - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):681-682.
  • Steadfast Intentions.Keith K. Niall - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):679-680.
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  • Computation and Consciousness.Drew McDermott - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):676-678.
  • The Powers of Machines and Minds.Chris Mortensen - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):678-679.
  • Uncertainty About Quantum Mechanics.Mark S. Madsen - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):674-675.
  • Gödel redux.Alexis Manaster-Ramer, Walter J. Savitch & Wlodek Zadrozny - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):675-676.
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  • The Discomforts of Dualism.Bruce MacLennan - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):673-674.
  • Time-Delays in Conscious Processes.Benjamin Libet - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):672-672.
  • Quantum AI.Rudi Lutz - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):672-673.
  • A Long Time Ago in a Computing Lab Far, Far Away….Jeffery L. Johnson, R. H. Ettinger & Timothy L. Hubbard - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):670-670.
  • Parallelism and Patterns of Thought.R. W. Kentridge - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):670-671.
  • Selecting for the Con in Consciousness.Deborah Hodgkin & Alasdair I. Houston - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):668-669.