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  1. Conceptual Frameworks on the Relationship Between Physics–Mathematics in the Newton Principia Geneva Edition (1822).Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti - 2022 - Foundations of Science 27.
    The aim of this paper is twofold: (1) to show the principal aspects of the way in which Newton conceived his mathematical concepts and methods and applied them to rational mechanics in his Principia; (2) to explain how the editors of the Geneva Edition interpreted, clarified, and made accessible to a broader public Newton’s perfect but often elliptic proofs. Following this line of inquiry, we will explain the successes of Newton’s mechanics, but also the problematic aspects of his perfect geometrical (...)
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  • Augustus De Morgan: Historian of Science.Adrian Rice - 1996 - History of Science 34 (104):201-240.
  • Newtonian, Converso, and Deist: The Lives of Jacob de Castro Sarmento.Matt Goldish - 1997 - Science in Context 10 (4):651-675.
    The ArgumentJacob de Castro Sarmento was a descendent of New Christians in Portugal who made his way to London in the early eighteenth century. There he professed Judaism openly, but he also advanced his scientific and medical pursuits, becoming particularly enamored of the Newtonian world view. This paper argues that Sarmento's attachment to Judaism was essentially a function of his personal relationship with Hakham David Nieto, and that Sarmento's Judaism was never really the full synthesis of scientific outlook and Jewish (...)
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  • Coleridge's Construction of Newton.Janusz Sysak - 1993 - Annals of Science 50 (1):59-81.
    A self-conscious antagonism to Newtonian science is widely seen as characteristic of the Romantic movement, and Coleridge is routinely portrayed as one of the major representatives of this anti-Newtonian sentiment. Although such a view of Coleridge is correct, his hostility to Newton is puzzling. The attitudes that Coleridge objected to are often expressly denied in Newton's published writings, and Coleridge's own ‘dynamic’ philosophy was, in fact, remarkably like the conception of nature personally favoured by Newton. Coleridge, then, must have been (...)
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