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  1. Knowledge and the Climate Change Issue: An Exploratory Study of Cluster and Extra-Cluster Effects.Jeremy Galbreath, David Charles & Des Klass - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (1):11-25.
    Climate change, while potentially impacting many industries, appears to have considerable significance to the wine industry. Yet little is known about how firms acquire knowledge and gain an understanding of climate change and its impacts. This study, exploratory in nature and studying firms from the wine-producing region of Tasmania, is one of the first in the management literature to use cluster theory to examine the climate change issue. Firms are predicted to exchange knowledge about climate change more readily with other (...)
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  • The Drivers of Climate Change Innovations: Evidence From the Australian Wine Industry.Jeremy Galbreath, David Charles & Eddie Oczkowski - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (2):217-231.
    This study examined the drivers of climate change innovations and the effects of these innovations on firm outcomes in a sample of 203 firms in the South Australian wine cluster. The results of structural equation modeling analysis suggest that absorptive capacity has a direct effect on climate change innovations, and stimulates knowledge exchanges between firms in the cluster. KEs between firms in the cluster in turn directly affect the climate change innovations. The findings suggest a perhaps counterintuitive interrelationship between firm- (...)
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  • How is Business Adapting to Climate Change Impacts Appropriately? Insight From the Commercial Port Sector.Changmin Jiang, Kevin Li, Zaili Yang, Tianni Wang & Adolf Ng - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1029-1047.
    Adaptation to climate change impacts is a key research topic in business ethics that poses substantial implications on the good lives of human beings. The commercial port sector is a highly relevant study focus with its pivotal roles in supply chains and international trade. Hence, it is important to investigate whether the port planning system and practice is appropriate in tackling climate change impacts. But beforehand, we must thoroughly understand the attitude and behaviors of port planners and operators on ports’ (...)
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  • Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility in Controversial Industry Sectors: The Social Value of Harm Minimisation. [REVIEW]Margaret Lindorff, Elizabeth Prior Jonson & Linda McGuire - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):457-467.
    This paper examines how it is possible for firms in controversial sectors, which are often marked by social taboos and moral debates, to act in socially responsible ways, and whether a firm can be socially responsible if it produces products harmful to society or individuals. It contends that a utilitarian justification can be used to support the legal and regulated provision of goods and services in these areas, and the regulated and legal provision of these areas produces less harm than (...)
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  • How is Business Adapting to Climate Change Impacts Appropriately? Insight From the Commercial Port Sector.Adolf K. Y. Ng, Tianni Wang, Zaili Yang, Kevin X. Li & Changmin Jiang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (4):1029-1047.
    Adaptation to climate change impacts is a key research topic in business ethics that poses substantial implications on the good lives of human beings. The commercial port sector is a highly relevant study focus with its pivotal roles in supply chains and international trade. Hence, it is important to investigate whether the port planning system and practice is appropriate in tackling climate change impacts. But beforehand, we must thoroughly understand the attitude and behaviors of port planners and operators on ports’ (...)
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  • When Do Board and Management Resources Complement Each Other? A Study of Effects on Corporate Social Responsibility.Jeremy Galbreath - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):281-292.
    Following resource-based and complementary asset perspectives, this paper examines the effects of board and management resources on corporate social responsibility in a sample of large Australian public firms. Specifically, this study posits that outside directors and women on boards are complementary in that their multiplicative effect incrementally influences CSR above their individual, independent effects. The hypothesis is confirmed. Further, the study tests the interactive effect of a senior CSR manager, determining the independent and complementary effects of managerial resources upon board (...)
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  • Voluntary Disclosure of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Contrasting the Carbon Disclosure Project and Corporate Reports.Florence Depoers, Thomas Jeanjean & Tiphaine Jérôme - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (3):445-461.
    As global warming continues to attract growing levels of attention, various stakeholders have put climate change on corporate agendas and expect firms to disclose relevant greenhouse gas information. In this paper, we investigate the consistency of the GHG information voluntarily disclosed by French listed firms through two different communication channels: corporate reports and the Carbon Disclosure Project. More precisely, we contrast the amounts of GHG emissions reported and the methodological explanations provided in each channel. Consistent with a stakeholder theory perspective, (...)
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  • Strategic Responses to Resource Management Pressures in Agriculture: Institutional, Gender and Location Effects.Joanne L. Tingey-Holyoak & John D. Pisaniello - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (2):381-400.
    Sustainable management of natural resources by farmers is under increasing public scrutiny. In Australia, the case of water unsustainably used and stored by agricultural businesses has gained attention with communities in catchments potentially deprived of water and placed at downstream risk. Yet, sustainable water management institutional policy mechanisms remain disjointed around the country. The study reported here applies a strategic response typology to a survey of 404 farmers in four different institutional environments in Australia to explore their responses to institutional (...)
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