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  1. Assessing Freshman Engineering Students’ Understanding of Ethical Behavior.Amber M. Henslee, Susan L. Murray, Gayla R. Olbricht, Douglas K. Ludlow, Malcolm E. Hays & Hannah M. Nelson - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):287-304.
    Academic dishonesty, including cheating and plagiarism, is on the rise in colleges, particularly among engineering students. While students decide to engage in these behaviors for many different reasons, academic integrity training can help improve their understanding of ethical decision making. The two studies outlined in this paper assess the effectiveness of an online module in increasing academic integrity among first semester engineering students. Study 1 tested the effectiveness of an academic honesty tutorial by using a between groups design with a (...)
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  • Patterns and Predictors of Academic Dishonesty in Moldovan University Students.Bob Ives & Lenuta Giukin - 2020 - Journal of Academic Ethics 18 (1):71-88.
    A total of 1390 university students from five public Moldovan universities completed a survey reporting their experiences and beliefs with respect to 22 types of academic misconduct. An interpretable five-factor solution to the frequencies of these behaviors accounted for more than half of the total variance. The two most reliable predictors were 1) how often students witnessed other students engage in these behaviors, and 2) perceived acceptability of the behaviors. Demographic predictors of these behaviors predicted minimal variance. Implications and limitations (...)
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  • Patterns and Predictors of Academic Dishonesty in Moldovan University Students.Bob Ives & Lenuta Giukin - 2020 - Journal of Academic Ethics 18 (1):71-88.
    A total of 1390 university students from five public Moldovan universities completed a survey reporting their experiences and beliefs with respect to 22 types of academic misconduct. An interpretable five-factor solution to the frequencies of these behaviors accounted for more than half of the total variance. The two most reliable predictors were 1) how often students witnessed other students engage in these behaviors, and 2) perceived acceptability of the behaviors. Demographic predictors of these behaviors predicted minimal variance. Implications and limitations (...)
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