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  1. On Recovery: Re-Directing the Concept by Differentiation of its Meanings.Yael Friedman - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (3):389-399.
    Recovery is a commonly used concept in both professional and everyday contexts. Yet despite its extensive use, it has not drawn much philosophical attention. In this paper, I question the common understanding of recovery, show how the concept is inadequate, and introduce new and much needed terminology. I argue that recovery glosses over important distinctions and even misrepresents the process of moving away from malady as "going back" to a former state of health. It does not invite important nuances needed (...)
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  • “Finding Oneself After Critical Illness”: Voices From the Remission Society.S. Ellingsen, A. L. Moi, E. Gjengedal, S. I. Flinterud, E. Natvik, M. Råheim, R. Sviland & R. J. T. Sekse - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (1):35-44.
    The number of people who survive critical illness is increasing. In parallel, a growing body of literature reveals a broad range of side-effects following intensive care treatment. Today, more attention is needed to improve the quality of survival. Based on nine individual stories of illness experiences given by participants in two focus groups and one individual interview, this paper elaborates how former critically ill patients craft and recraft their personal stories throughout their illness trajectory. The analysis was conducted from a (...)
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  • Τhe Multiple Temporalities of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Greece.Marilena Pateraki - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (3):353-362.
    This contribution intends to explore patients’ lived experience, with a focus on the temporal dimension. On the basis of a qualitative study that led me to interview persons with Parkinson’s disease, caregivers, and medical professionals, I develop an empirical and philosophical investigation of the temporalities surrounding the implementation of deep brain stimulation in Greece. I raise the issue of access to DBS medical care, and show how distinct temporalities are implied when the patients face such a matter: that of linear (...)
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  • Illness as the Saturated Phenomenon: The Contribution of Jean-Luc Marion.Māra Grīnfelde - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (1):71-83.
    During the last few decades, many thinkers have advocated for the importance of the phenomenological approach in developing the understanding of the lived experience of illness. In their attempts, they have referred to ideas found in the history of phenomenology, most notably, in the works of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Jean-Paul Sartre. The aim of this paper is to sketch out an interpretation of illness based on a yet unexplored conceptual framework of the phenomenology of French thinker (...)
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  • Heidegger, Communication, and Healthcare.Casey Rentmeester - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy (3):01-07.
    Communication between medical professionals and patients is an important aspect of therapy and patient satisfaction. Common barriers that get in the way of effective communication in this sphere include: (1) gender, age, and cultural differences; (2) physical or psychological discomfort or pain; (3) medical literacy; and (4) distraction due to technological factors or simply being overworked. The author examines these communicative barriers from a philosophical lens and then utilizes Martin Heidegger’s phenomenology and hermeneutics to provide guidance for medical professional–patient interactions. (...)
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  • The Meaning of Living Close to a Person with Alzheimer Disease.Mette Bergman, Caroline Graff, Maria Eriksdotter, Kerstin S. Fugl-Meyer & Marja Schuster - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (3):341-349.
    Only a few studies explore the lifeworld of the spouses of persons affected by early-onset Alzheimer disease. The aim of this study is to explore the lifeworld of spouses when their partners are diagnosed with AD, focusing on spouses’ lived experience. The study employs an interpretative phenomenological framework. Ten in-depth interviews are performed. The results show that spouses’ lifeworld changes with the diagnosis. They experience an imprisoned existence in which added obligations, fear, and worry keep them trapped at home, both (...)
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  • Depression as Unhomelike Being-in-the-World? Phenomenology’s Challenge to Our Understanding of Illness.Tamara Kayali & Furhan Iqbal - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):31-39.
    Fredrik Svenaeus has applied Heidegger’s concept of ‘being-in-the-world’ to health and illness. Health, Svenaeus contends, is a state of ‘homelike being-in-the-world’ characterised by being ‘balanced’ and ‘in-tune’ with the world. Illness, on the other hand, is a state of ‘unhomelike being-in-the-world’ characterised by being ‘off-balance’ and alienated from our own bodies. This paper applies the phenomenological concepts presented by Svenaeus to cases from a study of depression. In doing so, we show that while they can certainly enrich our understanding of (...)
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  • The Uncanny, Alienation and Strangeness: The Entwining of Political and Medical Metaphor.Andrew Edgar - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):313-322.
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  • The Four Dimensions of Embodiment and the Experience of Illness.Māra Grīnfelde - 2018 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 9 (2):107-127.
    In this paper I will try to systematically lay out and describe the multiple dimensions of the embodied experience of illness, which until recently has been the main focus within the field of the phenomenology of medicine. In order to do this, I will turn to analysis of the nature of embodiment in Husserl’s phenomenology. I will argue that based on Husserl’s phenomenology of the body, one can distinguish four ways of experiencing one’s body, or four dimensions of embodiment. I (...)
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  • Examining Carceral Medicine Through Critical Phenomenology.Andrea J. Pitts - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):14-35.
    The general aim of this paper is to provide insight into the relevance of critical phenomenology for the study of the patient-provider relationship in health care systems in U.S. jails, prisons, and detention facilities. In particular, I utilize tools from the work of scholars studying phenomenological approaches to health care and structural forms of oppression to analyze several harms that arise from the provision of medical care under the punitive constraints of carceral facilities.
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  • Patient Autonomy, Clinical Decision Making, and the Phenomenological Reduction.Jonathan Lewis & Søren Holm - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-13.
    Phenomenology gives rise to certain ontological considerations that have far-reaching implications for standard conceptions of patient autonomy in medical ethics, and, as a result, the obligations of and to patients in clinical decision-making contexts. One such consideration is the phenomenological reduction in classical phenomenology, a core feature of which is the characterisation of our primary experiences as immediately and inherently meaningful. This paper builds on and extends the analyses of the phenomenological reduction in the works of Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty (...)
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  • Beyond the Absent Body—A Phenomenological Contribution to the Understanding of Body Awareness in Health and Illness.Helena Dahlberg - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (2):e12235.
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  • Towards a Richer Debate on Tissue Engineering: A Consideration on the Basis of NEST-Ethics. [REVIEW]A. J. M. Oerlemans, M. E. C. van Hoek, E. van Leeuwen, S. van der Burg & W. J. M. Dekkers - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):963-981.
    In their 2007 paper, Swierstra and Rip identify characteristic tropes and patterns of moral argumentation in the debate about the ethics of new and emerging science and technologies (or “NEST-ethics”). Taking their NEST-ethics structure as a starting point, we considered the debate about tissue engineering (TE), and argue what aspects we think ought to be a part of a rich and high-quality debate of TE. The debate surrounding TE seems to be predominantly a debate among experts. When considering the NEST-ethics (...)
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  • Phenomenology Applied to Animal Health and Suffering.Walter Veit & Heather Browning - 2021 - In Susi Ferrarello (ed.), Phenomenology of Bioethics: Technoethics and Lived Experience. Springer. pp. 73-88.
    What is it like to be a bat? What is it like to be sick? These two questions are much closer to one another than has hitherto been acknowledged. Indeed, both raise a number of related, albeit very complex, philosophical problems. In recent years, the phenomenology of health and disease has become a major topic in bioethics and the philosophy of medicine, owing much to the work of Havi Carel (2007, 2011, 2018). Surprisingly little attention, however, has been given to (...)
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  • Pathology as a phenomenological tool.Havi Carel - 2021 - Continental Philosophy Review 54 (2):201-217.
    The phenomenological method has been fruitfully used to study the experience of illness in recent years. However, the role of illness is not merely that of a passive object for phenomenological scrutiny. I propose that illness, and pathology more generally, can be developed into a phenomenological method in their own right. I claim that studying cases of pathology, breakdown, and illness offer illumination not only of these experiences, but also of normal function and the tacit background that underpins it. In (...)
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  • Decolonization of the West, Desuperiorisation of Thought, and Elative Ethics.Björn Freter - 2019 - In Elvis Imafidon (ed.), Handbook of African Philosophy of Difference: The Othering of the Other. Cham: Springer. pp. 1-24.
    Through the vehicle of Nicolas Sarkozy’s so-called “Dakar Address” we will analyse the West’s persisting lack of insight into the need for a Western decolonization. We will try to identify the dangers that come from this refusal, such as the abidance in colonial patterns, the enduring self-understanding as superior com-pared to Africa, and the persisting unwillingness to accept the colonial guilt. Decolonization has to be understood as a two-fold business. Decolonization is over-coming endured and perpetrated violence. It is not only (...)
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  • Facing a Disruptive Face: Embodiment in the Everyday Experiences of “Disfigured” Individuals.Gili Yaron, Agnes Meershoek, Guy Widdershoven, Michiel van den Brekel & Jenny Slatman - 2017 - Human Studies 40 (2):285-307.
    In recent years, facial difference is increasingly on the public and academic agenda. This is evidenced by the growing public presence of individuals with an atypical face, and the simultaneous emergence of research investigating the issues associated with facial variance. The scholarship on facial difference approaches this topic either through a medical and rehabilitation perspective, or a psycho-social one. However, having a different face also encompasses an embodied dimension. In this paper, we explore this embodied dimension by interpreting the stories (...)
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  • ‘Transforming’ Self and World: A Phenomenological Study of a Changing Lifeworld Following a Cochlear Implant. [REVIEW]Linda Finlay & Patricia Molano-Fisher - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):255-267.
    After 50 years of being profoundly deaf, Patricia finds her world ‘transformed’—literally and metaphorically—when she receives a cochlear implant. Her sense of self and the taken-for-granted, comfortable world she knew before surgery disappear and she is thrown into an alien, surreal existence full of hyper-noise. Entry into this new world of sounds proves a mixed blessing as Pat struggles to come to terms with her changing relationships, not only with others but also with herself. On good days, she is exhilarated (...)
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  • Hermeneutics of Medicine in the Wake of Gadamer: The Issue of Phronesis.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2003 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):407-431.
    The relevance of the Aristotelian concept ofphronesis – practical wisdom – for medicine and medical ethics has been much debated during the last two decades. This paper attempts to show how Aristotle’s practical philosophy was of central importance toHans-Georg Gadamer and to the development of his philosophical hermeneutics, and how,accordingly, the concept of phronesiswill be central to a Gadamerian hermeneutics of medicine. If medical practice is conceived of as an interpretative meeting between doctor and patient with the aim of restoring (...)
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  • Can I Be Ill and Happy?Havi Carel - 2007 - Philosophia 35 (2):95-110.
    Can one be ill and happy? I use a phenomenological approach to provide an answer to this question, using Merleau-Ponty’s distinction between the biological and the lived body. I begin by discussing the rift between the biological body and the ill person’s lived experience, which occurs in illness. The transparent and taken for granted biological body is problematised by illness, which exposes it as different from the lived experience of this body. I argue that because of this rift, the experience (...)
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  • Engineering Flesh: Towards an Ethics of Lived Integrity. [REVIEW]Mechteld-Hanna Gertrud Derksen & Klasien Horstman - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):269-283.
    The objective of tissue engineering is to create living body parts that will fully integrate with the recipient’s body. With respect to the ethics of tissue engineering, one can roughly distinguish two perspectives. On the one hand, this technology is considered morally good because tissue engineering is ‘copying nature’ On the other hand, tissue engineering is considered morally dangerous because it defies nature: bodies constructed in the laboratory are seen as unnatural. In this article, we develop a phenomenological-ethical perspective on (...)
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  • 'I've Never Been Surrounded by so Many People and Felt so Alone' : A Heideggerian Phenomenological Study Investigating Patients' Experiences of Technology in Adult Intensive Care.Louise C. Stayt - unknown
    Research Question: What are patients’ experiences of technology in adult intensive care? Research Objectives: -To explore patients’ perceptions of receiving care in a technological environment -To explore patients’ perceptions of how technology has influenced their experience of care Background: Technology is fundamental to the physical recovery of critically ill patients in intensive care (ICU), however, there is a suggestion in the literature that its presence may dehumanise patient care and distract the nurse from attending to patients’ psychosocial needs. Little attention (...)
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  • Heidegger on the Notion of Dasein as Habited Body.Akoijam Thoibisana - 2008 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (2):1-5.
    Heidegger is often attacked for his failure to offer a thematic account of the body in his Being and Time (Aho, 2005). The general misunderstanding of Heidegger’s negation of body arises from the different meanings associated with the term ‘body’. Body can be understood from two perspectives: body in terms of corpse and body in terms of lived-body. Doctors study body as corpse or object because that is required in their training and education. Heidegger’s Being in his Being and Time (...)
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  • What is an Organ? Heidegger and the Phenomenology of Organ Transplantation.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):179-196.
    This paper investigates the question of what an organ is from a phenomenological perspective. Proceeding from the phenomenology of being-in-the-world developed by Heidegger in Being and Time and subsequent works, it compares the being of the organ with the being of the tool. It attempts to display similarities and differences between the embodied nature of the organs and the way tools of the world are handled. It explicates the way tools belong to the totalities of things of the world that (...)
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  • Phenomenology and its Application in Medicine.Havi H. Carel - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (1):33-46.
    Phenomenology is a useful methodology for describing and ordering experience. As such, phenomenology can be specifically applied to the first person experience of illness in order to illuminate this experience and enable health care providers to enhance their understanding of it. However, this approach has been underutilized in the philosophy of medicine as well as in medical training and practice. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of phenomenology to clinical medicine. In order to describe the experience of illness, we need a (...)
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  • Towards a Richer Debate on Tissue Engineering: A Consideration on the Basis of NEST-Ethics. [REVIEW]A. J. M. Oerlemans, M. E. C. Hoek, E. Leeuwen, S. Burg & W. J. M. Dekkers - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):963-981.
    In their 2007 paper, Swierstra and Rip identify characteristic tropes and patterns of moral argumentation in the debate about the ethics of new and emerging science and technologies (or “NEST-ethics”). Taking their NEST-ethics structure as a starting point, we considered the debate about tissue engineering (TE), and argue what aspects we think ought to be a part of a rich and high-quality debate of TE. The debate surrounding TE seems to be predominantly a debate among experts. When considering the NEST-ethics (...)
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  • How the Immune System Deploys Creativity: Why We Can Learn From Astronauts and Cosmonauts.Henderika de Vries & William Khoury-Hanold - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    In this interdisciplinary article, we investigate the relationship between creativity and the immune system; the creative features of the immune system and how the immune system and its role in regulating homeostasis might be related to creative cognition. We argue that within a multivariate approach of creativity, the immune system is a contributing factor. New directions for research are also discussed. When astronauts and cosmonauts venture into the new and extreme environment of outer space, their immune system needs to instantly (...)
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  • From Place to Space: A Heideggerian Analysis.Elizabeth Smythe, Deborah Spence & Jonathon Gray - 2018 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 18 (2):191-201.
    In this paper, we pay attention to the impact on staff of what was a new place, Ko Awatea, within a large New Zealand hospital. The place became a space from within which a particular mood arose. This paper seeks to capture that mood and its impact. Using a Heideggerian hermeneutic approach, the study reported on drew on data from interviews with 20 staff. Philosophical notions about the nature and mood of place/space are explored. As staff claimed this space, the (...)
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  • Narrating Stroke: The Life-Writing and Fiction of Brain Damage.Martina Zimmermann - 2012 - Medical Humanities 38 (2):73-77.
    Cerebro-vascular events are, after neurodegenerative disorders, the most frequent cause of brain damage that leads to the patient's impaired cognitive and/or bodily functioning. While the medico-scientific discourse related to stroke suggests that patients experience a change in identity and self-concept, the present analysis focuses on the patients' personal presentation of their experience to, first, highlight their way of thinking and feeling and, second, contribute to the clinician's actual understanding of the meaning of stroke within the life of each individual. As (...)
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  • Struggling Between Strength and Vulnerability, a Patients’ Counter Story.G. J. Teunissen, M. A. Visse & T. A. Abma - 2015 - Health Care Analysis 23 (3):288-305.
    Currently, patients are expected to take control over their health and their life and act as independent users and consumers. Simultaneously, health care policy demands patients are expected to self manage their disease. This article critically questions whether this is a realistic expectation. The paper presents the auto-ethnographic narrative of the first author, which spans a period of 27 years, from 1985 to 2012. In total nine episodes were extracted from various notes, conversations and discussions in an iterative process. Each (...)
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  • A Descriptive Social Neuroethics is Needed to Reveal Lived Identities.Craig L. Fry - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):16-17.
  • Introduction: Feminist Phenomenology, Medicine, Bioethics, and Health.Lauren Freeman - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):1-13.
    Although by no means mainstream, phenomenological approaches to bioethics and philosophy of medicine are no longer novel. Such approaches take the lived body —as opposed to the body understood as a material, biological object —as their point of departure to offer a more robust understanding of a plurality of experiences that go far beyond those surrounding disease...
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  • Subjectivity, Consciousness, and Pain: The Importance of Thinking Phenomenologically.Daniel Goldberg - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):14-16.