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  1. Involving the Public—Participatory Methods and Democratic Ideals.Annika Porsborg Nielsen, Jesper Lassen & Peter Sandøe - 2004 - Global Bioethics 17 (1):191-201.
    Participatory methods aim to address controversy over new technologies through public consultation. This paper first describes the emergence of participatory methods within the framework of technology assessment, then provides an overview of the landscape of participatory arrangements; and, finally, discusses participatory methods in relation to different democratic ideals. The article challenges the widespread assumption that participatory methods can function as normatively neutral tools, which can readily be employed in various social and political settings. Through a case study of consensus conferences (...)
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  • The Promises and Pitfalls of Participation.Deborah Oughton - 2004 - Global Bioethics 17 (1):181-189.
    Over the past ten years there has been an increased awareness of the importance of stakeholder involvement and public participation in policy making. However, despite the general consensus that stakeholder participation is important within decision-making, the debate as to how that participation should be undertaken and how the various methods for participation should be evaluated continues. This paper presents a number of possible evaluation criteria, suggesting that the appraisal of both procedures and outcomes needs to include consideration of the legitimacy (...)
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  • Do Publics Share Experts’ Concerns About Brain–Computer Interfaces? A Trinational Survey on the Ethics of Neural Technology.Matthew Sample, Sebastian Sattler, David Rodriguez-Arias, Stefanie Blain-Moraes & Eric Racine - 2019 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 2019 (6):1242-1270.
    Since the 1960s, scientists, engineers, and healthcare professionals have developed brain–computer interface (BCI) technologies, connecting the user’s brain activity to communication or motor devices. This new technology has also captured the imagination of publics, industry, and ethicists. Academic ethics has highlighted the ethical challenges of BCIs, although these conclusions often rely on speculative or conceptual methods rather than empirical evidence or public engagement. From a social science or empirical ethics perspective, this tendency could be considered problematic and even technocratic because (...)
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  • Survey Article: Citizen Panels and the Concept of Representation.Mark B. Brown - 2006 - Journal of Political Philosophy 14 (2):203-225.
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  • Why is Integration so Difficult? Shifting Roles of Ethics and Three Idioms for Thinking About Science, Technology and Society.Rune Nydal - 2015 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):21-36.
    Contemporary science and technology research are now expected to become more responsible through collaboration with social scientists and scholars from the humanities. This paper suggests a frame explaining why such current calls for ‘integration’ are seen as appropriate across sectors even though there are no shared understanding of how proper integration is to take place. The call for integration is understood as a response to shifting roles of ethics within research structures following shifts in modes of knowledge production. Integration is (...)
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  • Prescribed Argumentation, Actual Argumentation, Reported Argumentation.Ilaria Casillo & Marianne Doury - 2022 - Journal of Argumentation in Context 11 (1):133-155.
    This article starts from the observation that, in order to ensure their legitimacy, the modes of governance in place in most Western democracies make more room for citizen participation in decision-making processes. The result is the implementation of various participatory mechanisms, many of which seek to stimulate a citizen’s argumentative expression. Based on a case study, we observe the norms that govern such participation processes and their implementation in the argumentative exchanges.
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  • Unpolitical Democracy.Nadia Urbinati - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (1):65-92.
    This paper analyzes critically the appeal the unpolitical is enjoying among contemporary political philosophers who are democracy's friends. Unlike a radical critique of democracy, what I propose to call "criticism from within," takes the form of dissatisfaction with the erosion of an independent mind and impartial judgment per effect of the partisan character of democratic politics. This paper proposes three main criticisms of the actual trend toward unpolitical views of democracy: the first points to the strategic use of deliberation as (...)
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  • Evaluating Ethical Tools.Payam Moula & Per Sandin - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (2):263-279.
    This article reviews suggestions for how ethical tools are to be evaluated and argues that the concept of ethical soundness as presented by Kaiser et al. is unhelpful. Instead, it suggests that the quality of an ethical tool is determined by how well it achieves its assigned purpose. Those are different for different tools, and the article suggests a categorization of such tools into three groups. For all ethical tools, it identifies comprehensiveness and user-friendliness as crucial. For tools that have (...)
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  • Frame Reflection Lab: A Playful Method for Frame Reflection on Synthetic Biology.Marjoleine G. van der Meij, Anouk A. L. M. Heltzel, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse & Frank Kupper - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):155-172.
    Synthetic biology is an emerging technology that asks for inclusive reflection on how people frame the field. To unravel how we can facilitate such reflection, this study evaluates the Frame Reflection Lab. Building upon playfulness design principles, the FRL comprises a workshop with video-narratives and co-creative group exercises. We studied how the FRL facilitated frame reflection by organizing workshops with various student groups. Analysis of 12 group conversations and 158 mini-exit surveys yielded patterns in first-order reflection as well as patterns (...)
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  • New Horizons on Robotics: Ethics Challenges.António Moniz - 2019 - In Maria Céu do Patrão Neves (ed.), Ethics, Science and Society: Challenges for BioPolitics. Lisboa, Portugal: pp. 57-67.
    In this chapter, the focus is on robotics development and its ethical implications, especially on some particular applications or interaction principles. In recent years, such developments have happened very quickly, based on the advances achieved in the last few decades in industrial robotics. The technological developments in manufacturing, with the implementation of Industry 4.0 strategies in most industrialized countries, and the dissemination of production strategies into services and health sectors, enabled robotics to develop in a variety of new directions. Policy (...)
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  • Assembling Upstream Engagement: The Case of the Portuguese Deliberative Forum on Nanotechnologies.António Carvalho & João Arriscado Nunes - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):99-113.
    This article analyzes a deliberative forum on nanotechnologies, organized in Portugal within the scope of the research project DEEPEN—Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies. This event included scientists, science communicators and members of the “lay public”, and resulted in a position document which summarizes collective aspirations and concerns related to nano. Drawing upon our previous experience with focus groups on nanotechnologies—characterized by methodological innovations that aimed at suspending epistemological inequalities between participants—this paper delves into the performativity of the (...)
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  • Anchoring European Governance: Two Versions of Responsible Research and Innovation and EU Fundamental Rights as ‘Normative Anchor Points’.Daniele Ruggiu - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (3):217-235.
    Among the various experiments in ‘new governance’, the model of Responsible Research and Innovation is emerging in the European landscape as quite promising. Up to now, there have been two versions of RRI: a socio-empirical version which tends to underline the role of democratic processes aimed at identifying values on which governance needs to be anchored and a normative version which stresses the role of EU goals as ‘normative anchor points’ of both governance strategies and policy making. Both versions are (...)
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  • An Ethics of Expertise Based on Informed Consent.Kevin C. Elliott - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):637-661.
    Ethicists widely accept the notion that scientists have moral responsibilities to benefit society at large. The dissemination of scientific information to the public and its political representatives is central to many of the ways in which scientists serve society. Unfortunately, the task of providing information can often give rise to moral quandaries when scientific experts participate in politically charged debates over issues that are fraught with uncertainty. This paper develops a theoretical framework for an “ethics of expertise” (EOE) based on (...)
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  • Theatre and Research in the Reproductive Sciences.Jeff Nisker - 2010 - Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):81-90.
    This paper explores the power of theatre to engage the public and my personal journey using theatre as a research tool in reproductive science. I argue that the capacity of theatre to simultaneously engage the minds and hearts of audience members qua research participants affords audience members the capacity to provide researchers with insightful comments informed by the scientific, social and tacit knowledge derived from the performance, integrated with their lived experience. Theatre is a particularly important research strategy when investigating (...)
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  • Unlocking the Puzzle of Public Participation.Seth Tuler & Thomas Webler - 2002 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 22 (3):179-189.
    Public participation is well known for its practitioner insights and wealth of case reports. This knowledge is essential and has been well employed. Likewise, the theoretical literature on public participation is growing rapidly. The need for better conceptual and theoretical understandings of public participation has become clear. Public participation theories have not received great attention, and few have been proposed or tested. Yet theory offers much to practitioners of various interventions. The authors summarize work toward developing a public participation theory (...)
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  • Evaluating Interactive Policy Making on Biotechnology: The Case of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport.Joske F. G. Bunders, Anneloes Roelofsen, Tjard de Cock Buning & Jacqueline E. W. Broerse - 2009 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 29 (6):447-463.
    Public engagement is increasingly advocated and applied in the development and implementation of technological innovations. However, initiatives so far are rarely considered effective. There is a need for more methodological rigor and insight into conducive conditions. The authors developed an evaluative framework and assessed accordingly the effectiveness of a project of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport in which the application of interactive policy making was piloted in medical biotechnology, among others, to increase the legitimacy and quality of (...)
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  • Maximizing the Policy Impacts of Public Engagement: A European Study.Lynn J. Frewer, Henk A. J. Mulder & Steven B. Emery - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (3):421-444.
    There is a lack of published evidence which demonstrates the impacts of public engagement in science and technology policy. This might represent the failure of PE to achieve policy impacts or indicate a lack of effective procedures for discerning the uptake by policy makers of PE-derived outputs. While efforts have been made to identify and categorize different types of policy impact, research has rarely attempted to link policy impact with PE procedures, political procedures, or the connections between them. In this (...)
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  • Drama, Talk, and Emotion: Omitted Aspects of Public Participation.Matthew Harvey - 2009 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 34 (2):139-161.
    This article argues that the quantitative and quasi-experimental approach to evaluating public participation exercises is deficient in at least two respects. First, casting participants in instrumental terms excludes that participants have an experience and that this may be dramatic and emotional. If people are to be invited, even obliged, to participate, then this experience should be considered in event evaluation. Second, current evaluation frameworks tend not to be sensitive to what actually happened in terms of the actions of participants and (...)
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  • The Troubling Logic of Inclusivity in Environmental Consultations.Robin S. Gregory - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (1):144-165.
    Inclusivity is widely considered a requirement of defensible environmental risk consultations and is often either mandated or recommended to help ensure attention to stakeholders’ diverse views. Experience suggests the opposite: the emphasis on an inclusive consultation process often makes it impossible for decision makers to listen carefully to stakeholders and for citizens’ views to influence the design and choice of proposed actions. This paper briefly reviews the promise of environmental risk consultations before outlining several of the more serious problems associated (...)
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  • Beyond Speaking Truth? Institutional Responses to Uncertainty in Scientific Governance.Cordula Kropp & Kathrin Braun - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (6):771-782.
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  • Democratizing Knowledge: Sustainable and Conventional Agricultural Field Days as Divergent Democratic Forms.Michael S. Carolan - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (4):508-528.
    This article highlights that in our rush to call for the democratization of science and expertise we must not forget to speak to what type of democratization we are calling for. In short, not all participatory forms are the same. In developing this argument, I examine one such form that has yet to receive much attention from science and technology studies scholars: the agricultural field day. In examining the field day, we find that its orientation—that is, toward either the conventional (...)
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  • Where Are the Politics? Perspectives on Democracy and Technology.Harro van Lente & Roel Nahuis - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (5):559-581.
    The politics of innovation involves displacements between various interrelated settings ranging from the context of design to the context of use. This variety of settings and their particular qualities raise questions about the democratic implications of displacements, which have been addressed within science and technology studies for decades from different perspectives and along various theoretical strands. This article distinguishes five different traditions of conceptualizing the relation between technological innovation and democracy: an intentionalist, a proceduralist, an actor—network, an interpretivist, and a (...)
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  • Patient Partnership in Decision-Making on Biomedical Research: Changing the Network.Joske F. G. Bunders, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse & J. Francisca Caron-Flinterman - 2007 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 32 (3):339-368.
    Participation of end users in decision-making on science is increasingly practiced, as witnessed by the growing body of scientific literature on case evaluations. In the biomedical field, however, end-user participation in decision-making is rare. Some scholars argue that because patients are stakeholders and relevant experts, they could also provide important contributions to decision-making within the field of biomedical research. But what strategies could be used to effectively implement patient participation in decision-making on biomedical research? In this article, we analyze strategies (...)
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  • Fallacies of Virtualization: A Case Study of Farming, Manure, Landscapes, and Dutch Rural Policy.Bettina B. Bock & Wiebren J. Boonstra - 2009 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 34 (4):427-448.
    The recent rapprochement between Science and Technology Studies and Political Science is induced by the broadened understanding of political action. The debate concerning the nature of ``the political'' produces an important question concerning the possibilities of an issue- or object-oriented focus for understanding political action. The purpose of this article is to contribute to this debate through an analysis of how relations between material and social entities are continuously recontextualized and decontextualized in social and political interaction. The authors discuss established (...)
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  • A Typology of Public Engagement Mechanisms.Lynn J. Frewer & Gene Rowe - 2005 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 30 (2):251-290.
    Imprecise definition of key terms in the “public participation” domain have hindered the conduct of good research and militated against the development and implementation of effective participation practices. In this article, we define key concepts in the domain: public communication, public consultation, and public participation. These concepts are differentiated according to the nature and flow of information between exercise sponsors and participants. According to such an information flow perspective, an exercise’s effectiveness may be ascertained by the efficiency with which full, (...)
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  • Deliberating Competence: Theoretical and Practitioner Perspectives on Effective Participatory Appraisal Practice.Jason Chilvers - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (3):421-451.
    The “participatory turn” cutting across technical approaches for appraising environment, risk, science, and technology has been accompanied by intense debates over the desired nature, extent, and quality of public engagement in science. Burgeoning work evaluating the effectiveness of such processes and the social study of science in society more generally is notable, however, for lacking systematic understanding of the very actors shaping these new forms science-society interaction. This paper addresses this lacuna by drawing on United Kingdom based in-depth empirical research (...)
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  • Evaluating Public-Participation Exercises: A Research Agenda.Lynn J. Frewer & Gene Rowe - 2004 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 29 (4):512-556.
    The concept of public participation is one of growing interest in the UK and elsewhere, with a commensurate growth in mechanisms to enable this. The merits of participation, however, are difficult to ascertain, as there are relatively few cases in which the effectiveness of participation exercises have been studied in a structured manner. This seems to stem largely from uncertainty in the research community as to how to conduct evaluations. In this article, one agenda for conducting evaluation research that might (...)
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  • Technology Theory and Deliberative Democracy.Patrick W. Hamlett - 2003 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 28 (1):112-140.
    This article examines the debate about the normative relevance of social constructivism, arguing that the criticisms of Winner, Radder, and others are fundamentally accurate. The article argues that a combination of Radder's notion of nonlocal values and Martin's concern for deliberative interventions may offer a theoretical exit from the normative irrelevance that marks constructivism. The article goes on to suggest that theoretical and praxeological developments in two other literatures, participatory public policy analysis and deliberative democracy, may provide fruitful initiatives for (...)
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  • Locating Scientific Citizenship: The Institutional Contexts and Cultures of Public Engagement.Nick Pidgeon, Mavis Jones, Irene Lorenzoni & Karen Bickerstaff - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (4):474-500.
    In this article, we explore the institutional negotiation of public engagement in matters of science and technology. We take the example of the Science in Society dialogue program initiated by the UK’s Royal Society, but set this case within the wider experience of the public engagement activities of a range of charities, corporations, governmental departments, and scientific institutions. The novelty of the analysis lies in the linking of an account of the dialogue event and its outcomes to the values, practices, (...)
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  • An Emotional Deliberation Approach to Risk.Udo Pesch & Sabine Roeser - 2016 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 41 (2):274-297.
    Emotions are often met with suspicion in political debates about risky technologies, because they are seen as contrary to rational decision making. However, recent emotion research rejects such a dichotomous view of reason and emotion, by seeing emotions as an important source of moral insight. Moral emotions such as compassion and feelings of responsibility and justice can play an important role in judging ethical aspects of technological risks, such as justice, fairness, and autonomy. This article discusses how this idea can (...)
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  • Assessing Quality of Stakeholder Engagement: From Bureaucracy to Democracy.Brian Wynne, Deborah H. Oughton, Astrid Liland & Yevgeniya Tomkiv - 2017 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 37 (3):167-178.
    The idea of public or stakeholder engagement in governance of science and technology is widely accepted in many policy and academic research settings. However, this enthusiasm for stakeholder engagement has not necessarily resulted in changes of attitudes toward the role of stakeholders in the dialogue nor to the value of public knowledge, practical experience, and other inputs vis-à-vis expert knowledge. The formal systems of evaluation of the stakeholder engagement activities are often focused on showing that the method is efficient and (...)
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  • Remaking Participation in Science and Democracy.Matthew Kearnes & Jason Chilvers - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (3):347-380.
    Over the past few decades, significant advances have been made in public engagement with, and the democratization of, science and technology. Despite notable successes, such developments have often struggled to enhance public trust, avert crises of expertise and democracy, and build more socially responsive and responsible science and innovation. A central reason for this is that mainstream approaches to public engagement harbor what we call “residual realist” assumptions about participation and publics. Recent coproductionist accounts in science and technology studies offer (...)
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  • The Developmental State and Public Participation: The Case of Energy Policy-Making in Post–Fukushima Japan.Hiro Saito - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (1):139-165.
    After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the Japanese government tried to democratize energy policy-making by introducing public participation. Over the course of its implementation, however, public participation came to be subordinated to expert committees as the primary mechanism of policy rationalization. The expert committees not only neutralized the results of public participation but also discounted the necessity of public participation itself. This trajectory of public participation, from its historic introduction to eventual collapse, can be fully explained only in reference to (...)
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  • Fact, Friction, and Political Conviction in Science Policy Controversies.Gordon R. Mitchell & Marcus Paroske - 2000 - Social Epistemology 14 (2-3):89-107.
  • Participación ciudadana y cultura científica.José Antonio López Cerezo - 2005 - Arbor 181 (715):351-362.
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  • Into Blue Skies—a Transdisciplinary Foresight and Co-Creation Method for Adding Robustness to Visioneering.Mahshid Sotoudeh & Niklas Gudowsky - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (1):93-106.
    Expectations play a distinctive role in shaping emerging technologies and producing hype cycles when a technology is adopted or fails on the market. To harness expectations, facilitate and provoke forward-looking discussions, and identify policy alternatives, futures studies are required. Here, expert anticipation of possible or probable future developments becomes extremely arbitrary beyond short-term prediction, and the results of futures studies are often controversial, divergent, or even contradictory; thus they are contested. Nevertheless, such socio-technical imaginaries may prescribe a future that seems (...)
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  • Collective Agency and the Concept of ‘Public’ in Public Involvement: A Practice-Oriented Analysis.Tobias Hainz, Sabine Bossert & Daniel Strech - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundPublic involvement activities are promoted as measures for ensuring good governance in challenging fields, such as biomedical research and innovation. Proponents of public involvement activities include individual researchers as well as non-governmental and governmental organizations. However, the concept of ‘public’ in public involvement deserves more attention by researchers because it is not purely theoretical: it has important practical functions in the guidance, evaluation and translation of public involvement activities.DiscussionThis article focuses on collective agency as one property a public as a (...)
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  • Technologies of Democracy: Experiments and Demonstrations.Brice Laurent - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):649-666.
    Technologies of democracy are instruments based on material apparatus, social practices and expert knowledge that organize the participation of various publics in the definition and treatment of public problems. Using three examples related to the engagement of publics in nanotechnology in France (a citizen conference, a series of public meetings, and an industrial design process), the paper argues that Science and Technology Studies provide useful tools and methods for the analysis of technologies of democracy. Operations of experiments and public demonstrations (...)
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  • Consumer Attitudes Towards the Development of Animal-Friendly Husbandry Systems.L. J. Frewer, A. Kole, S. M. A. Van de Kroon & C. de Lauwere - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (4):345-367.
    Recent policy developments in the area of livestock husbandry have suggested that, from the perspective of optimizing animal welfare, new animal husbandry systems should be developed that provide opportunities for livestock animals to be raised in environments where they are permitted to engage in “natural behavior.” It is not known whether consumers regard animal husbandry issues as important, and whether they differentiate between animal husbandry and other animal welfare issues. The responsibility for the development of such systems is allocated jointly (...)
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  • Public Appraisal of Government Efforts and Participation Intent in Medico-Ethical Policymaking in Japan: A Large Scale National Survey Concerning Brain Death and Organ Transplant. [REVIEW]Hajime Sato, Akira Akabayashi & Ichiro Kai - 2005 - BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-12.
    Public satisfaction with policy process influences the legitimacy and acceptance of policies, and conditions the future political process, especially when contending ethical value judgments are involved. On the other hand, public involvement is required if effective policy is to be developed and accepted.
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  • Whom to Trust? Public Concerns, Late Modern Risks, and Expert Trustworthiness.Geert Munnichs - 2004 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (2):113-130.
    This article discusses the conditions under which the use of expert knowledge may provide an adequate response to public concerns about high-tech, late modern risks. Scientific risk estimation has more than once led to expert controversies. When these controversies occur, the public at large – as a media audience – faces a paradoxical situation: on the one hand it must rely on the expertise of scientists as represented in the mass media, but on the other it is confused by competing (...)
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  • What is Required of Requirements?Sara H. Wilford - 2015 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):348-355.
    Responsible research and innovation considers the impact of development on stakeholders and provides a direction for the future of science and technology. Therefore, in the practical world of the lab, what is needed is a set of guidelines to assist in the application of those RRI principles. However, to ensure that any guidelines are usable and acceptable, it is important to engage with those who would actually be expected to implement them. Stakeholders are often asked to evaluate a set of (...)
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  • Toward Inclusive Tech Policy Design: A Method for Underrepresented Voices to Strengthen Tech Policy Documents.Meg Young, Lassana Magassa & Batya Friedman - 2019 - Ethics and Information Technology 21 (2):89-103.
    To be successful, policy must anticipate a broad range of constituents. Yet, all too often, technology policy is written with primarily mainstream populations in mind. In this article, drawing on Value Sensitive Design and discount evaluation methods, we introduce a new method—Diverse Voices—for strengthening pre-publication technology policy documents from the perspective of underrepresented groups. Cost effective and high impact, the Diverse Voices method intervenes by soliciting input from “experiential” expert panels. We first describe the method. Then we report on two (...)
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  • Learning From a University-Cosponsored Regional Consensus Conference.Mike Kim & Bob Hudspith - 2002 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 22 (3):232-238.
    A consensus conference can be used to enable ordinary citizens to have informed input into policy making concerning controversial science and technology issues. To test whether this process could be used at a local level, facilitated by expertise from a university, McMaster University and the City of Hamilton, Ontario, cosponsored a regional consensus conference on waste management. This article describes this experience and evaluates it from three perspectives: how well the process satisfied the criteria of a good public participation process, (...)
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  • Evaluation of a Deliberative Conference.Lynn J. Frewer, Roy Marsh & Gene Rowe - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (1):88-121.
    The concept of “public participation” is currently one of great interest to researchers and policy makers. In response to a perceived need for greater public involvement in decision making and policy formation processes on the part of both policymakers and the general public, a variety of novel mechanisms have been developed, such as the consensus conference and citizens jury, to complement traditional mechanisms, such as the public meeting. However, the relative effectiveness of the various mechanisms is unclear, as efforts at (...)
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  • Deliberating Competence: Theoretical and Practitioner Perspectives on Effective Participatory Appraisal Practice.Jason Chilvers - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (2):155-185.
    The “participatory turn” cutting across technical approaches for appraising environment, risk, science, and technology has been accompanied by intense debates over the desired nature, extent, and quality of public engagement in science. Burgeoning work evaluating the effectiveness of such processes and the social study of science in society more generally is notable, however, for lacking systematic understanding of the very actors shaping these new forms science-society interaction. This paper addresses this lacuna by drawing on United Kingdom based in-depth empirical research (...)
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  • Processes of Inclusion, Cultures of Calculation, Structures of Power: Scientific Citizenship and the Royal Commission on Genetic Modification.Joanna Goven - 2006 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 31 (5):565-598.
    The significance of political-economic context for scientific citizenship is argued through an analysis of New Zealand’s Royal Commission on Genetic Modification. My intention is not to provide an account of why the commission came to the decisions it did but to illustrate how the political-economic context and the culture of regulatory science both exacerbate public concerns about unacknowledged uncertainty and commercial influence and make it difficult for those concerns to influence the outcomes of public dialogues. The discursive flexibility of science (...)
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  • Technical Adversarialism and Participatory Collaboration in the U.S. Chemical Weapons Disposal Program.Robert Futrell - 2003 - Science, Technology and Human Values 28 (4):451-482.
    There has been a great deal of theoretical discussion about the merits and faults of greater public involvement in technology policy decisions but comparatively less case-based empirical consideration. This article assesses the theoretical and practical implications of two decision styles—technical adversarialism and participatory collaboration—in decision making on the U.S. Chemical Weapons Disposal Program. This case is useful in that it allows for a longitudinal assessment of these two distinct decision approaches applied to the same policy issue and provides an opportunity (...)
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  • Those Who Get Hurt Aren’T Always Being Heard: Scientist-Resident Interactions Over Community Water.Trudy Pauluth Penner, Gail Bradshaw, Donna Tait, Brenda Storr, Robin McMillan, Lilian Pozzer-Ardenghi, Janet Riecken & Wolff-Michael Roth - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (2):153-183.
    This study is about the interaction of scientific expertise and local knowledge in the context of a contested issue: the quality and quantity of safe drinking water available to some residents in one Canadian community. The authors articulate the boundary work in which scientific and technological expertise and discourse are played out against local knowledge and water needs to prevent the construction of a water main extension that would provide a group of residents with the same water that others in (...)
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  • Interactive Technology Assessment in the Real World: Dual Dynamics in an iTA Exercise on Genetically Modified Vines.Arie Rip, Pierre-Benoit Joly & Claire Marris - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (1):77-100.
    Participatory Technology Assessment initiatives have usually been analyzed as if they existed in a social and political vacuum. This article analyzes the linkages that occur, in both directions, between the microcosm set up by a pTA exercise and the real world outside. This dual-dynamics perspective leads to a new way of understanding the function and significance of pTA initiatives. Rather than viewing them as a means to create the ideal conditions for real public debate, they are viewed here as an (...)
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