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  1. Frame Reflection Lab: A Playful Method for Frame Reflection on Synthetic Biology.Marjoleine G. van der Meij, Anouk A. L. M. Heltzel, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse & Frank Kupper - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):155-172.
    Synthetic biology is an emerging technology that asks for inclusive reflection on how people frame the field. To unravel how we can facilitate such reflection, this study evaluates the Frame Reflection Lab. Building upon playfulness design principles, the FRL comprises a workshop with video-narratives and co-creative group exercises. We studied how the FRL facilitated frame reflection by organizing workshops with various student groups. Analysis of 12 group conversations and 158 mini-exit surveys yielded patterns in first-order reflection as well as patterns (...)
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  • Transformative Participation in Agrobiodiversity Governance: Making the Case for an Environmental Justice Approach.Brendan Coolsaet - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (6):1089-1104.
    This paper makes the case for an environmental justice approach to the practice and study of participation and effectiveness in agrobiodiversity governance. It is argued that, in order to understand the conditions under which participation leads to improved outcomes, the concept has to be rethought, both from a political and a methodological perspective. This can be done by applying an ex-ante environmental justice approach to participation, including notions of distribution, recognition and representation. By exploring the approach through empirical examples of (...)
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  • Evaluating Interactive Policy Making on Biotechnology: The Case of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport.Joske F. G. Bunders, Anneloes Roelofsen, Tjard de Cock Buning & Jacqueline E. W. Broerse - 2009 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 29 (6):447-463.
    Public engagement is increasingly advocated and applied in the development and implementation of technological innovations. However, initiatives so far are rarely considered effective. There is a need for more methodological rigor and insight into conducive conditions. The authors developed an evaluative framework and assessed accordingly the effectiveness of a project of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport in which the application of interactive policy making was piloted in medical biotechnology, among others, to increase the legitimacy and quality of (...)
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  • Maximizing the Policy Impacts of Public Engagement: A European Study.Lynn J. Frewer, Henk A. J. Mulder & Steven B. Emery - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (3):421-444.
    There is a lack of published evidence which demonstrates the impacts of public engagement in science and technology policy. This might represent the failure of PE to achieve policy impacts or indicate a lack of effective procedures for discerning the uptake by policy makers of PE-derived outputs. While efforts have been made to identify and categorize different types of policy impact, research has rarely attempted to link policy impact with PE procedures, political procedures, or the connections between them. In this (...)
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  • Exploring Responsibility Rationales in Research and Development.Neelke Doorn - 2012 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 37 (3):180-209.
    The present article explores the rationales of scientists and engineers for distributing moral responsibilities related technology development. On the basis of a qualitative case study, it was investigated how the actors within a research network distribute responsibilities for these issues. Rawls’ Wide Reflective Equilibrium model was used as a descriptive framework. This study indicates that there is a correlation between the actors’ ethics position and their responsibility rationale. When discussing how to address ethical issues or how to distribute the responsibility (...)
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  • Drama, Talk, and Emotion: Omitted Aspects of Public Participation.Matthew Harvey - 2009 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 34 (2):139-161.
    This article argues that the quantitative and quasi-experimental approach to evaluating public participation exercises is deficient in at least two respects. First, casting participants in instrumental terms excludes that participants have an experience and that this may be dramatic and emotional. If people are to be invited, even obliged, to participate, then this experience should be considered in event evaluation. Second, current evaluation frameworks tend not to be sensitive to what actually happened in terms of the actions of participants and (...)
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  • Disastrous Publics: Counter-Enactments in Participatory Experiments.Manuel Tironi - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (4):564-587.
    This article explores how citizen participation was methodologically devised and materially articulated in the postdisaster reconstruction of Constitución, one of the most affected cities after the earthquake and tsunami that battered south central Chile in 2010. I argue that the techniques deployed to engineer the participation were arranged as a policy experiment where a particular type of public was provoked—one characterized by its emotional detachment, political engagement, and social tolerance. The case of Constitución, however, also shows that this public ran (...)
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  • A Democracy Paradox in Studies of Science and Technology.Silke Beck, Roger Pielke & Eva Lövbrand - 2011 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 36 (4):474-496.
    Today many scholars seem to agree that citizens should be involved in expert deliberations on science and technology issues. This interest in public deliberation has gained attraction in many practical settings, especially in the European Union, and holds the promise of more legitimate governance of science and technology. In this article, the authors draw on the European Commission’s report ‘‘Taking the European Knowledge Society Seriously’’ to ask how legitimate these efforts to ‘‘democratize’’ scientific expertise really are. While the report borrows (...)
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  • A Typology of Public Engagement Mechanisms.Lynn J. Frewer & Gene Rowe - 2005 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 30 (2):251-290.
    Imprecise definition of key terms in the “public participation” domain have hindered the conduct of good research and militated against the development and implementation of effective participation practices. In this article, we define key concepts in the domain: public communication, public consultation, and public participation. These concepts are differentiated according to the nature and flow of information between exercise sponsors and participants. According to such an information flow perspective, an exercise’s effectiveness may be ascertained by the efficiency with which full, (...)
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  • Deliberating Competence: Theoretical and Practitioner Perspectives on Effective Participatory Appraisal Practice.Jason Chilvers - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (3):421-451.
    The “participatory turn” cutting across technical approaches for appraising environment, risk, science, and technology has been accompanied by intense debates over the desired nature, extent, and quality of public engagement in science. Burgeoning work evaluating the effectiveness of such processes and the social study of science in society more generally is notable, however, for lacking systematic understanding of the very actors shaping these new forms science-society interaction. This paper addresses this lacuna by drawing on United Kingdom based in-depth empirical research (...)
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  • “You've Got It, You May Have It, You Haven't Got It”: Multiplicity, Heterogeneity, and the Unintended Consequences of HIV-Related Tests.Kevin P. Corbett - 2009 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 34 (1):102-125.
    This article considers the experiences of health consumers who have undergone testing for human immunodeficiency virus antibodies, T cells, and viral load. These HIV-related tests are deployed for the purposes of making definitive diagnoses; yet some test consumers experience ambiguous outcomes. Drawing on an analysis of differing end-user experiences of these tests, where consumers' knowledge reflected the multiplicity and heterogeneity in test design, the author explores how these experiences reflect particular knowledges about these tests. The article contributes to efforts analyzing (...)
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  • It’s About Time: Adaptive Resource Management, Environmental Governance, and Science Studies.Kristoffer Whitney - 2019 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 44 (2):263-290.
    This article examines adaptive resource management as it has been applied to the US horseshoe crab fishery over the past decade. As a critical yet constructive exercise, I have three goals: to suggest how adaptive management, for all its promise, can still be improved; to add a nuanced case study to the literatures on the quantification of nature and environmental decision-making; and to use the example of ARM to make certain temporal aspects of contemporary natural resource management more salient to (...)
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  • Deliberations on the Life Science: Pitfalls, Challenges and Solutions.M. J. J. A. A. Korthals - unknown
    In this article I sketch several versions of the deliberative approach and then discuss five problems which confront a deliberative ethicist of contemporary problems of the life sciences, in particular about food, nature and agriculture. I begin by discussing problems of unequal participation in deliberations and secondly analyze cognitive and normative uncertainties that abound in the life sciences like biotechnology. Thirdly, these sciences comprise different scripts that steer the type of outcome, like products and services. Dependent on the framing, the (...)
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  • Society as Experiment: Sociological Foundations for a Self-Experimental Society.Matthias Gross & Wolfgang Krohn - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (2):63-86.
    Experiments are generally thought of as actions or operations undertaken to test a scientific hypothesis in settings detached from the rest of society. In this paper a different notion of experiment will be discussed. It is an understanding that has been developed in the classical tradition of the Chicago School of Sociology since the 1890s, but has so far remained unexplored. This sociological understanding of experiment does not model itself strictly on the natural sciences. Rather, it implies a process of (...)
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  • Ethics of Risk Analysis and Regulatory Review: From Bio- to Nanotechnology. [REVIEW]Jennifer Kuzma & John C. Besley - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (2):149-162.
    Risk analysis and regulatory systems are usually evaluated according to utilitarian frameworks, as they are viewed to operate “objectively” by considering the health, environmental, and economic impacts of technological applications. Yet, the estimation of impacts during risk analysis and the decisions in regulatory review are affected by value choices of actors and stakeholders; attention to principles such as autonomy, justice, and integrity; and power relationships. In this article, case studies of biotechnology are used to illustrate how non-utilitarian principles are prominent (...)
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  • Technologies of Democracy: Experiments and Demonstrations.Brice Laurent - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):649-666.
    Technologies of democracy are instruments based on material apparatus, social practices and expert knowledge that organize the participation of various publics in the definition and treatment of public problems. Using three examples related to the engagement of publics in nanotechnology in France (a citizen conference, a series of public meetings, and an industrial design process), the paper argues that Science and Technology Studies provide useful tools and methods for the analysis of technologies of democracy. Operations of experiments and public demonstrations (...)
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  • Consumer Attitudes Towards the Development of Animal-Friendly Husbandry Systems.L. J. Frewer, A. Kole, S. M. A. Van de Kroon & C. de Lauwere - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (4):345-367.
    Recent policy developments in the area of livestock husbandry have suggested that, from the perspective of optimizing animal welfare, new animal husbandry systems should be developed that provide opportunities for livestock animals to be raised in environments where they are permitted to engage in “natural behavior.” It is not known whether consumers regard animal husbandry issues as important, and whether they differentiate between animal husbandry and other animal welfare issues. The responsibility for the development of such systems is allocated jointly (...)
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  • The Contribution of Local Experiments and Negotiation Processes to Field-Level Learning in Emerging (Niche) Technologies: Meta-Analysis of 27 New Energy Projects in Europe.Bettina Brohmann, Mike Hodson, Raimo Lovio, Eva Heiskanen & Rob P. J. M. Raven - 2008 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 28 (6):464-477.
    This article examines how local experiments and negotiation processes contribute to social and field-level learning. The analysis is framed within the niche development literature, which offers a framework for analyzing the relation between projects in local contexts and the transfer of local experiences into generally applicable rules. The authors examine 2 case studies drawn from a meta-analysis of 27 new energy projects. The case studies, both pertaining to biogas projects for local municipalities, illustrate the diversity of applications for a technology (...)
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  • What Is Public Engagement, and What Is It For? A Study of Scientists’ and Science Communicators’ Views.Linda Davies, Clive Potter & Hauke Riesch - 2016 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 36 (3):179-189.
    The “Open Air Laboratories” is a large, England-wide environmental public engagement project based on the “citizen science” model. It is designed to involve people of all backgrounds and abilities in the production of environmental science and in the process to educate and raise awareness and enthusiasm about nature and its importance. This article draws on a series of interviews with scientists and science communicators involved in the project to explore their motivations and aims for the project and what they see (...)
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  • Evaluation of a Deliberative Conference.Lynn J. Frewer, Roy Marsh & Gene Rowe - 2004 - Science, Technology and Human Values 29 (1):88-121.
    The concept of “public participation” is currently one of great interest to researchers and policy makers. In response to a perceived need for greater public involvement in decision making and policy formation processes on the part of both policymakers and the general public, a variety of novel mechanisms have been developed, such as the consensus conference and citizens jury, to complement traditional mechanisms, such as the public meeting. However, the relative effectiveness of the various mechanisms is unclear, as efforts at (...)
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  • Deliberating Competence: Theoretical and Practitioner Perspectives on Effective Participatory Appraisal Practice.Jason Chilvers - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (2):155-185.
    The “participatory turn” cutting across technical approaches for appraising environment, risk, science, and technology has been accompanied by intense debates over the desired nature, extent, and quality of public engagement in science. Burgeoning work evaluating the effectiveness of such processes and the social study of science in society more generally is notable, however, for lacking systematic understanding of the very actors shaping these new forms science-society interaction. This paper addresses this lacuna by drawing on United Kingdom based in-depth empirical research (...)
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  • Participatory Approaches in Science and Technology: Historical Origins and Current Practices in Critical Perspective.Martin Lengwiler - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (2):186-200.
    Recent science and technology studies have analyzed questions of nonexpert participation in science, technology, and science policy from an empirically grounded perspective. The introduction to this special issue offers a double contribution to this debate. First, it presents a summary of the state of the art and an outline of the historical emergence of the participatory question. The argument distinguishes four periods since the late nineteenth century, each with a specific relationship between expert and nonexpert knowledge ranging from a hybrid, (...)
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  • Consumer Attitudes Towards the Development of Animal-Friendly Husbandry Systems.L. J. Frewer, A. Kole, S. M. A. Van de Kroon & C. De Lauwere - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (4):345-367.
    Recent policy developments in the area of livestock husbandry have suggested that, from the perspective of optimizing animal welfare, new animal husbandry systems should be developed that provide opportunities for livestock animals to be raised in environments where they are permitted to engage in “natural behavior.” It is not known whether consumers regard animal husbandry issues as important, and whether they differentiate between animal husbandry and other animal welfare issues. The responsibility for the development of such systems is allocated jointly (...)
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