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  1. Forward-Looking Activities: Incorporating Citizens' Visions.Niklas Gudowsky, Walter Peissl, Mahshid Sotoudeh & Ulrike Bechtold - 2012 - Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):101-123.
    Looking back on the many prophets who tried to predict the future as if it were predetermined, at first sight any forward-looking activity is reminiscent of making predictions with a crystal ball. In contrast to fortune tellers, today’s exercises do not predict, but try to show different paths that an open future could take. A key motivation to undertake forward-looking activities is broadening the information basis for decision-makers to help them actively shape the future in a desired way. Experts, laypeople, (...)
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  • Comprehending Stakeholders’ Involvement in the Integrated Development Planning Process as a Tool for Improved Community Participation.John Mamokhere & Daniel Francois Meyer - 2022 - EUREKA: Social and Humanities 4:18-32.
    This study is primarily aimed at comprehending the key stakeholders, involved in applying the Integrated Development Planning process for improved community participation in the Tzaneen municipal area. It is argued in this study, that the IDP is centred on the priorities and desires of the communities. Communities have the opportunity to engage in identifying their most desired needs. The IDP process requires all stakeholders who live and do business within a municipal jurisdiction to partake in the design and execution of (...)
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  • Deliberative Public Opinion: Development of a Social Construct.Kieran C. O’Doherty - 2017 - History of the Human Sciences 30 (4):124-145.
    Generally, public opinion is measured via polls or survey instruments, with a majority of responses in a particular direction taken to indicate the presence of a given ‘public opinion’. However, discursive psychological and related scholarship has shown that the ontological status of both individual opinion and public opinion is highly suspect. In the first part of this article I draw on this body of work to demonstrate that there is currently no meaningful theoretical foundation for the construct of public opinion (...)
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  • Handservant of Technocracy.Christian Ross - 2022 - Spontaneous Generations 10 (1):63-87.
    The place of scientific expertise in democracy has become increasingly disputed, raising question who ought to have a say in decision-making about science and technology, with what authority, and for what reasons. Public engagement has become a common refrain in technoscientific discussions to address tensions in the rightful roles of experts and the public in democratic decision-making. However, precisely what public engagement entails, who it involves, how it is performed, and to what extent it is desirable for democratic societies remain (...)
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  • Restore politics in societal debates on new genomic techniques.Lonneke M. Poort, Jac A. A. Swart, Ruth Mampuys, Arend J. Waarlo, Paul C. Struik & Lucien Hanssen - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-10.
    End of April 2021, the European Commission published its study on New Genomic Techniques. The study involved a consultation of Member States and stakeholders. This study reveals a split on whether current legislation should be maintained or adapted to take account of scientific progress and the risk level of NGT products. This split was predictable. New technological developments challenge both ethical viewpoints and regulatory institutions; and contribute to the growing divide between science and society that value ‘technological innovations’ differently. Such (...)
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  • Inviting Everyone to the Table: Strategies for More Effective and Legitimate Food Policy Via Deliberative Approaches.Rachel A. Ankeny - 2016 - Journal of Social Philosophy 47 (1):10-24.
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  • Multi-Cellular Engineered Living Systems: Building a Community Around Responsible Research on Emergence.Matthew Sample, Marion Boulicault, Caley Allen, Rashid Bashir, Insoo Hyun, Megan Levis, Caroline Lowenthal, David Mertz & Nuria Montserrat - 2019 - Biofabrication 11 (4).
    Ranging from miniaturized biological robots to organoids, multi-cellular engineered living systems (M-CELS) pose complex ethical and societal challenges. Some of these challenges, such as how to best distribute risks and benefits, are likely to arise in the development of any new technology. Other challenges arise specifically because of the particular characteristics of M-CELS. For example, as an engineered living system becomes increasingly complex, it may provoke societal debate about its moral considerability, perhaps necessitating protection from harm or recognition of positive (...)
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  • A Framework for the Ethical Impact Assessment of Information Technology.David Wright - 2011 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):199-226.
    This paper proposes a framework for an ethical impact assessment which can be performed in regard to any policy, service, project or programme involving information technology. The framework is structured on the four principles posited by Beauchamp and Childress together with a separate section on privacy and data protection. The framework identifies key social values and ethical issues, provides some brief explanatory contextual information which is then followed by a set of questions aimed at the technology developer or policy-maker to (...)
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  • What Is Good Public Deliberation?Susan Dorr Goold, Michael A. Neblo, Scott Y. H. Kim, Raymond de Vries, Gene Rowe & Peter Muhlberger - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (2):24-26.
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  • Reciprocity in Firm–Stakeholder Dialog: Timeliness, Valence, Richness, and Topicality.Lite J. Nartey, Witold J. Henisz & Sinziana Dorobantu - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-23.
    Scholars of stakeholder management have long grappled with the question of how to communicate with stakeholders to enhance cooperation and reduce conflict. We build on insights from the literature on stakeholder dialog to highlight the importance of four elements of firm–stakeholder dialog processes: timing, valence, richness, and topicality of firms’ responses to stakeholder engagements. We demonstrate a link between these elements of the firm–stakeholder dialog process and changes in stakeholder cooperation or conflict with the firm, as well as contingent tradeoffs (...)
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  • Prescribed Argumentation, Actual Argumentation, Reported Argumentation.Ilaria Casillo & Marianne Doury - 2022 - Journal of Argumentation in Context 11 (1):133-155.
    This article starts from the observation that, in order to ensure their legitimacy, the modes of governance in place in most Western democracies make more room for citizen participation in decision-making processes. The result is the implementation of various participatory mechanisms, many of which seek to stimulate a citizen’s argumentative expression. Based on a case study, we observe the norms that govern such participation processes and their implementation in the argumentative exchanges.
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  • National Ethics Advisory Bodies in the Emerging Landscape of Responsible Research and Innovation.Franc Mali, Toni Pustovrh, Blanka Groboljsek & Christopher Coenen - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (3):167-184.
    The article examines the role played by policy advice institutions in the governance of ethically controversial new and emerging science and technology in Europe. The empirical analysis, which aims to help close a gap in the literature, focuses on the evolution, role and functioning of national ethics advisory bodies (EABs) in Europe. EABs are expert bodies whose remit is to issue recommendations regarding ethical aspects of new and emerging science and technology. Negative experiences with the impacts of science and technology (...)
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  • Community Engagement and Field Trials of Genetically Modified Insects and Animals.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):25-36.
    New techniques for the genetic modification of organisms are creating new strategies for addressing persistent public health challenges. For example, the company Oxitec has conducted field trials internationally—and has attempted to conduct field trials in the United States—of a genetically modified mosquito that can be used to control dengue, Zika, and some other mosquito-borne diseases. In 2016, a report commissioned by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine discussed the potential benefits and risks of another strategy, using gene drives. (...)
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  • Subject Positioning and Deliberative Democracy: Understanding Social Processes Underlying Deliberation.Kieran C. O'doherty & Helen J. Davidson - 2010 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 40 (2):224-245.
  • Revisiting Foucault's ‘Normative Confusions’: Surveying the Debate Since the Collège de France Lectures.Christopher R. Mayes - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (12):841-855.
    At once historical and philosophical, Michel Foucault used his genealogical method to expose the contingent conditions constituting the institutions, sciences and practices of the present. His analyses of the asylum, clinic, prison and sexuality revealed the historical, political and epistemological forces that make up certain types of subjects, sciences and sites of control. Although noting the originality of his work, a number of early critics questioned the normative framework of Foucault's method. Nancy Fraser argued that Foucault's genealogical method was ‘normatively (...)
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  • Evaluating Ethical Tools.Payam Moula & Per Sandin - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (2):263-279.
    This article reviews suggestions for how ethical tools are to be evaluated and argues that the concept of ethical soundness as presented by Kaiser et al. is unhelpful. Instead, it suggests that the quality of an ethical tool is determined by how well it achieves its assigned purpose. Those are different for different tools, and the article suggests a categorization of such tools into three groups. For all ethical tools, it identifies comprehensiveness and user-friendliness as crucial. For tools that have (...)
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  • Discussion Structures as Tools for Public Deliberation.E. Popa, Vincent Blok & R. Wesselink - 2020 - Public Understanding of Science 1 (29):76-93.
    We propose the use of discussion structures as tools for analyzing policy debates in a way that enables the increased participation of lay stakeholders. Discussion structures are argumentation-theoretical tools that can be employed to tackle three barriers that separate lay stakeholders from policy debates: difficulty, magnitude, and complexity. We exemplify the use of these tools on a debate in research policy on the question of responsibility. By making use of discussion structures, we focus on the argumentative moves performed by the (...)
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  • Frame Reflection Lab: A Playful Method for Frame Reflection on Synthetic Biology.Marjoleine G. van der Meij, Anouk A. L. M. Heltzel, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse & Frank Kupper - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):155-172.
    Synthetic biology is an emerging technology that asks for inclusive reflection on how people frame the field. To unravel how we can facilitate such reflection, this study evaluates the Frame Reflection Lab. Building upon playfulness design principles, the FRL comprises a workshop with video-narratives and co-creative group exercises. We studied how the FRL facilitated frame reflection by organizing workshops with various student groups. Analysis of 12 group conversations and 158 mini-exit surveys yielded patterns in first-order reflection as well as patterns (...)
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  • Models of Public Engagement: Nanoscientists’ Understandings of Science–Society Interactions.Regula Burri - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):81-98.
    This paper explores how scientists perceive public engagement initiatives. By drawing on interviews with nanoscientists, it analyzes how researchers imagine science–society interactions in an early phase of technological development. More specifically, the paper inquires into the implicit framings of citizens, of scientists, and of the public in scientists’ discourses. It identifies four different models of how nanoscientists understand public engagement which are described as educational, paternalistic, elitist, and economistic. These models are contrasted with the dialog model of public engagement promoted (...)
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  • New Horizons on Robotics: Ethics Challenges.António Moniz - 2019 - In Maria Céu do Patrão Neves (ed.), Ethics, Science and Society: Challenges for BioPolitics. Lisboa, Portugal: pp. 57-67.
    In this chapter, the focus is on robotics development and its ethical implications, especially on some particular applications or interaction principles. In recent years, such developments have happened very quickly, based on the advances achieved in the last few decades in industrial robotics. The technological developments in manufacturing, with the implementation of Industry 4.0 strategies in most industrialized countries, and the dissemination of production strategies into services and health sectors, enabled robotics to develop in a variety of new directions. Policy (...)
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  • Assembling Upstream Engagement: The Case of the Portuguese Deliberative Forum on Nanotechnologies.António Carvalho & João Arriscado Nunes - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):99-113.
    This article analyzes a deliberative forum on nanotechnologies, organized in Portugal within the scope of the research project DEEPEN—Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies. This event included scientists, science communicators and members of the “lay public”, and resulted in a position document which summarizes collective aspirations and concerns related to nano. Drawing upon our previous experience with focus groups on nanotechnologies—characterized by methodological innovations that aimed at suspending epistemological inequalities between participants—this paper delves into the performativity of the (...)
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  • Engineers of Life? A Critical Examination of the Concept of Life in the Debate on Synthetic Biology.Johannes Steizinger - 2016 - In Georg Toepfer & Margret Engelhard (eds.), : Ambivalences of Creating Life – Societal and Philosophical Dimensions of Synthetic Biology. Heidelberg: Springer. pp. 275−292.
    The concept of life plays a crucial role in the debate on synthetic biology. The first part of this chapter outlines the controversial debate on the status of the concept of life in current science and philosophy. Against this background, synthetic biology and the discourse on its scientific and societal consequences is revealed as an exception. Here, the concept of life is not only used as buzzword but also discussed theoretically and links the ethical aspects with the epistemological prerequisites and (...)
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  • Evaluating Interactive Policy Making on Biotechnology: The Case of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport.Joske F. G. Bunders, Anneloes Roelofsen, Tjard de Cock Buning & Jacqueline E. W. Broerse - 2009 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 29 (6):447-463.
    Public engagement is increasingly advocated and applied in the development and implementation of technological innovations. However, initiatives so far are rarely considered effective. There is a need for more methodological rigor and insight into conducive conditions. The authors developed an evaluative framework and assessed accordingly the effectiveness of a project of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport in which the application of interactive policy making was piloted in medical biotechnology, among others, to increase the legitimacy and quality of (...)
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  • A Toolkit for Democratizing Science and Technology Policy: The Practical Mechanics of Organizing a Consensus Conference.Carol Lobes, Judith Adrian, Joshua Grice, Maria Powell & Daniel Lee Kleinman - 2007 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 27 (2):154-169.
    A widely touted approach to involving laypeople in science and technology policy-related decisions is the consensus conference. Virtually nothing written on the topic provides detailed discussion of the many steps from citizen recruitment to citizen report. Little attention is paid to how and why the mechanics of the consensus conference process might influence the diversity of the participants in theses fora, the quality of the deliberation in the citizen sessions, the experiences of the participants and organizers, and other outcomes that (...)
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  • Maximizing the Policy Impacts of Public Engagement: A European Study.Lynn J. Frewer, Henk A. J. Mulder & Steven B. Emery - 2015 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 40 (3):421-444.
    There is a lack of published evidence which demonstrates the impacts of public engagement in science and technology policy. This might represent the failure of PE to achieve policy impacts or indicate a lack of effective procedures for discerning the uptake by policy makers of PE-derived outputs. While efforts have been made to identify and categorize different types of policy impact, research has rarely attempted to link policy impact with PE procedures, political procedures, or the connections between them. In this (...)
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  • Drama, Talk, and Emotion: Omitted Aspects of Public Participation.Matthew Harvey - 2009 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 34 (2):139-161.
    This article argues that the quantitative and quasi-experimental approach to evaluating public participation exercises is deficient in at least two respects. First, casting participants in instrumental terms excludes that participants have an experience and that this may be dramatic and emotional. If people are to be invited, even obliged, to participate, then this experience should be considered in event evaluation. Second, current evaluation frameworks tend not to be sensitive to what actually happened in terms of the actions of participants and (...)
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  • Beyond Speaking Truth? Institutional Responses to Uncertainty in Scientific Governance.Cordula Kropp & Kathrin Braun - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (6):771-782.
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  • Talking Shops or Talking Turkey?: Institutionalizing Consumer Representation in Risk Regulation.Henry Rothstein - 2007 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 32 (5):582-607.
    Participative reforms to risk regulation are often argued to enhance the evidence base, improve the representation of the public interest, and build support for policy processes and outcomes. While rationales and mechanisms for participation have received most scholarly attention, less attention has been paid to the actual impact of participation on policy processes and outcomes. This article, therefore, considers the impacts of participation by examining the UK Food Standards Agency's Consumer Committee, which was created in 2002 to institutionalize consumer representation (...)
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  • Assessing Quality of Stakeholder Engagement: From Bureaucracy to Democracy.Brian Wynne, Deborah H. Oughton, Astrid Liland & Yevgeniya Tomkiv - 2017 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 37 (3):167-178.
    The idea of public or stakeholder engagement in governance of science and technology is widely accepted in many policy and academic research settings. However, this enthusiasm for stakeholder engagement has not necessarily resulted in changes of attitudes toward the role of stakeholders in the dialogue nor to the value of public knowledge, practical experience, and other inputs vis-à-vis expert knowledge. The formal systems of evaluation of the stakeholder engagement activities are often focused on showing that the method is efficient and (...)
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  • Pollinating Collaboration: Diverse Stakeholders’ Efforts to Build Experiments in the Wake of the Honey Bee Crisis.Sainath Suryanarayanan & Daniel Lee Kleinman - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (4):686-711.
    We explored collaboration between scientists and nonscientists through a deliberative process in which stakeholders interested in the health challenges of honey bees gathered on four occasions over two years to design, carry out, and analyze a set of field experiments on honey bee health. We found that issues of trust and authority were crucial matters in constraining and enabling dialogue among our deliberants. Over the course of our deliberations, participants’ trust for one another and appreciation of their respective interests grew, (...)
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  • Remaking Participation in Science and Democracy.Matthew Kearnes & Jason Chilvers - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (3):347-380.
    Over the past few decades, significant advances have been made in public engagement with, and the democratization of, science and technology. Despite notable successes, such developments have often struggled to enhance public trust, avert crises of expertise and democracy, and build more socially responsive and responsible science and innovation. A central reason for this is that mainstream approaches to public engagement harbor what we call “residual realist” assumptions about participation and publics. Recent coproductionist accounts in science and technology studies offer (...)
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  • Hopeful and Concerned: Public Input on Building a Trustworthy Medical Information Commons.Patricia A. Deverka, Dierdre Gilmore, Jennifer Richmond, Zachary Smith, Rikki Mangrum, Barbara A. Koenig, Robert Cook-Deegan, Angela G. Villanueva, Mary A. Majumder & Amy L. McGuire - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):70-87.
    A medical information commons is a networked data environment utilized for research and clinical applications. At three deliberations across the U.S., we engaged 75 adults in two-day facilitated discussions on the ethical and social issues inherent to sharing data with an MIC. Deliberants made recommendations regarding opt-in consent, transparent data policies, public representation on MIC governing boards, and strict data security and privacy protection. Community engagement is critical to earning the public's trust.
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  • Participación ciudadana y cultura científica.José Antonio López Cerezo - 2005 - Arbor 181 (715):351-362.
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  • Engaging Whom and for What Ends? Australian Stakeholders' Constructions of Public Engagement in Relation to Nanotechnologies.A. Petersen & D. Bowman - 2012 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 12 (2):67-79.
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  • Public Participation in National Preparedness and Response Plans for Pandemic Influenza: Towards an Ethical Contribution to Public Health Policies.Yanick Farmer, Marie-Ève Bouthillier, Marianne Dion-Labrie, Céline Durand & Hubert Doucet - 2010 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):9-23.
    Faced with the threat of pandemic influenza, several countries have made the decision to put a number of measures in place which have been incorporated into national plans. In view of the magnitude of the powers and responsibilities that States assume in the event of a pandemic, a review of the various national preparedness and response plans for pandemic influenza brought to light a series of extremely important ethical concerns. Nevertheless, in spite of the recent emergence of literature focusing specifically (...)
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  • Exploring the Ethics of Global Health Research Priority-Setting.Bridget Pratt, Mark Sheehan, Nicola Barsdorf & Adnan A. Hyder - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):94.
    Thus far, little work in bioethics has specifically focused on global health research priority-setting. Yet features of global health research priority-setting raise ethical considerations and concerns related to health justice. For example, such processes are often exclusively disease-driven, meaning they rely heavily on burden of disease considerations. They, therefore, tend to undervalue non-biomedical research topics, which have been identified as essential to helping reduce health disparities. In recognition of these ethical concerns and the limited scholarship and dialogue addressing them, we (...)
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  • Technologies of Democracy: Experiments and Demonstrations.Brice Laurent - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):649-666.
    Technologies of democracy are instruments based on material apparatus, social practices and expert knowledge that organize the participation of various publics in the definition and treatment of public problems. Using three examples related to the engagement of publics in nanotechnology in France (a citizen conference, a series of public meetings, and an industrial design process), the paper argues that Science and Technology Studies provide useful tools and methods for the analysis of technologies of democracy. Operations of experiments and public demonstrations (...)
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  • Critical Review of Methods for Risk Ranking of Food Related Hazards, Based on Risks for Human Health.H. J. van der Fels-Klerx, E. D. van Asselt, M. Raley, M. Poulsen, H. Korsgaard, L. Bredsdorff, M. Nauta, M. D'Agostino, D. Coles, H. J. P. Marvin & L. J. Frewer - unknown
    This study aimed to critically review methods for ranking risks related to food safety and dietary hazards on the basis of their anticipated human health impacts. A literature review was performed to identify and characterize methods for risk ranking from the fields of food, environmental science and socio-economic sciences. The review used a predefined search protocol, and covered the bibliographic databases Scopus, CABs, Web of Sciences, and PubMed over the period 1993-2013. All references deemed relevant, on the basis of of (...)
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  • Sub-National Human Rights Institutions:A Definition and Typology.Andrew Wolman - 2017 - Human Rights Review 18 (1):87-109.
    In this paper, I argue that independent governmental human rights bodies at the sub-national level now comprise a meaningful group that can be understood as a sub-national counterpart to National Human Rights Institutions. In accordance with the term’s growing usage among human rights practitioners, I label these bodies as “Sub-national Human Rights Institutions”. So far, however, SNHRIs have been the subject of very little academic attention, although there have been many studies of individual SNHRIs or particular types of SNHRIs. With (...)
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  • Moral and Instrumental Norms in Food Risk Communication.Peter G. Modin & Sven Ove Hansson - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):313 - 324.
    The major normative recommendations in the literature on food risk communication can be summarized in the form of seven practical principles for such communication: (1) Be honest and open. (2) Disclose incentives and conflicts of interest. (3) Take all available relevant knowledge into consideration. (4) When possible, quantify risks. (5) Describe and explain uncertainties. (6) Take all the public's concerns into account. (7) Take the rights of individuals and groups seriously. We show that each of these proposed principles can be (...)
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  • Increasing Engagement in Regulatory Science: Reflections From the Field of Risk Assessment.Gaby-Fleur Böl & Leonie Dendler - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (4):719-754.
    While the demands for greater engagement in science in general and regulatory science in particular have been steadily increasing, we still face limited understanding of the empirical resonance of these demands. Against this context, this paper presents findings from a recent study of a potential participatory opening of the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, a prominent regulatory scientific organization in the field of risk governance. Drawing upon quantitative surveys of the public and selected professional experts as well as in-depth (...)
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  • Addressing Responsible Research and Innovation to Industry.Emad Yaghmaei - 2015 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):294-300.
    Responsible research and innovation is taking a role to assist all types of stakeholders including industry to move research and innovation initiatives to responsible manner for tackling grand challenges. The literature on RRI focuses little on how industry can implement RRI principles. In solving such gap in the literature, this article constructs a solid framework that provides a conceptual starting point for future research on levels of RRI. It draws a fundamental path to align industrial activities with environmental and societal (...)
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  • The Contribution of Local Experiments and Negotiation Processes to Field-Level Learning in Emerging (Niche) Technologies: Meta-Analysis of 27 New Energy Projects in Europe.Bettina Brohmann, Mike Hodson, Raimo Lovio, Eva Heiskanen & Rob P. J. M. Raven - 2008 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 28 (6):464-477.
    This article examines how local experiments and negotiation processes contribute to social and field-level learning. The analysis is framed within the niche development literature, which offers a framework for analyzing the relation between projects in local contexts and the transfer of local experiences into generally applicable rules. The authors examine 2 case studies drawn from a meta-analysis of 27 new energy projects. The case studies, both pertaining to biogas projects for local municipalities, illustrate the diversity of applications for a technology (...)
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  • The Paradox of Participation Experiments.Alexander Bogner - 2012 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 37 (5):506-527.
    An ongoing trend in technology policy has been to advocate participation. However, the author claims that lay citizens’ participation typically materializes in the form of a laboratory experiment at present. That is, lay participation as currently organized by professional participation experts under controlled conditions rarely is linked to public controversies, to the pursuit of political participation or to individual concerns. Derived from qualitative research on two citizen conferences, the author shows empirically that in practice, this laboratory participation leads to paradoxical (...)
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  • Outreaching, Outsourcing, and Disembedding: How Offshore Wind Scientists Consider Their Engagement with Society.Sara Heidenreich - 2018 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 43 (3):464-486.
    The role of the individual scientist as a socialization agent is increasingly emphasized in science policy. This article analyzes offshore wind scientists’ narratives about science–technology–society relations and their role in them. It particularly focuses on the nuanced and detailed reasons that scientists give for their level of engagement with society. The analysis is based on semistructured individual and focus group interviews with thirty-five scientists. It finds a diversity of narratives related to the questions of whether socialization of technology is needed (...)
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  • Managing the Experience of Evidence: England’s Experimental Waste Technologies and Their Immodest Witnesses. [REVIEW]Joshua Reno - 2011 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 36 (6):842-863.
    This article explores the technoenvironmental politics associated with government-sponsored climate change mitigation. It focuses on England’s New Technologies Demonstrator Programme, established to test the “viability” of “green” waste treatments by awarding state aid to eight experimental projects that promise to divert municipal waste from landfill and greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. The article examines how these demonstrator sites are arranged and represented to produce noncontroversial and publicly accessible forms of evidence and experience and, ultimately, to inform environmental policy and planning (...)
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  • Employee Reactions to Leader-Initiated Crisis Preparation: Core Dimensions.Marcus Selart, Svein Tvedt Johansen & Synnøve Nesse - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):99-106.
    Crisis prevention plans are usually evaluated based on their effects in terms of preventing or limiting organizational crisis. In this survey-based study, the focus was instead on how such plans influence employees’ reactions in terms of risk perception and well-being. Five different organizations were addressed in the study. Hypothesis 1 tested the assumption that leadership crisis preparation would lead to lower perceived risk among the employees. Hypothesis 2 tested the conjecture that it would also lead to a higher degree of (...)
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  • Animal Welfare Concerns and Values of Stakeholders Within the Dairy Industry.B. A. Ventura, M. A. G. von Keyserlingk & D. M. Weary - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (1):109-126.
    This paper describes the perspectives of stakeholders within the North American dairy industry on key issues affecting the welfare of dairy cattle. Five heterogeneous focus groups were held during a dairy cattle welfare meeting in Guelph, Canada in October 2012. Each group contained between 7 and 10 participants and consisted of a mix of dairy producers, veterinarians, academics, students, and dairy industry specialists. The 1-h facilitated discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Content analysis of the resulting transcripts showed that participants (...)
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  • Ethics, Risk and Benefits Associated with Different Applications of Nanotechnology: A Comparison of Expert and Consumer Perceptions of Drivers of Societal Acceptance.L. J. Frewer, A. R. H. Fischer & N. Gupta - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (2):93-108.
    Examining those risk and benefit perceptions utilised in the formation of attitudes and opinions about emerging technologies such as nanotechnology can be useful for both industry and policy makers involved in their development, implementation and regulation. A broad range of different socio-psychological and affective factors may influence consumer responses to different applications of nanotechnology, including ethical concerns. A useful approach to identifying relevant consumer concerns and innovation priorities is to develop predictive constructs which can be used to differentiate applications of (...)
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  • The Importance of Participatory Virtues in the Future of Environmental Education.Matt Ferkany & Kyle Powys Whyte - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):419-434.
    Participatory approaches to environmental decision making and assessment continue to grow in academic and policy circles. Improving how we understand the structure of deliberative activities is especially important for addressing problems in natural resources, climate change, and food systems that have wicked dimensions, such as deep value disagreements, high degrees of uncertainty, catastrophic risks, and high costs associated with errors. Yet getting the structure right is not the only important task at hand. Indeed, participatory activities can break down and fail (...)
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