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  1. Language acquisition: Growth or learning?Geoffrey Sampson - 1989 - Philosophical Papers 18 (3):203-240.
  • About competence.John L. Tienson - 1990 - Philosophical Papers 19 (1):19-36.
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  • Précis of Behaviorism: A conceptual reconstruction.G. E. Zuriff - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):687-699.
    The conceptual framework of behaviorism is reconstructed in a logical scheme rather than along chronological lines. The resulting reconstruction is faithful to the history of behaviorism and yet meets the contemporary challenges arising from cognitive science, psycholinguistics, and philosophy. In this reconstruction, the fundamental premise is that psychology is to be a natural science, and the major corollaries are that psychology is to be objective and empirical. To a great extent, the reconstruction of behaviorism is an elaboration of behaviorist views (...)
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  • Radical behaviorism and theoretical entities.G. E. Zuriff - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):572.
  • Conceptual reconstruction: A reconstruction.G. E. Zuriff - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):716-723.
  • On the operational definition of a toothache.Colin Wright - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):571.
  • Why creoles won't reveal the properties of universal grammar.Ellen Woolford - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):211.
  • Rules are not processes.Robert Wilensky - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):415.
  • Does cognitive neuropsychology have a future?J. T. L. Wilson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):456-457.
  • Consciousness: Limited but consequential.Timothy D. Wilson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):701-701.
  • Autonomy and the nature of the input.Wendy Wilkins - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):638-638.
  • Negation in Skinner's system.N. E. Wetherick - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):606-607.
  • Parameter setting and early emergence.Amy Weinberg - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):637-638.
  • On constraining the class of transformational languages.Thomas Wasow - 1978 - Synthese 39 (1):81 - 104.
  • Debatable constraints.Thomas Wasow - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):636-637.
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  • Organum ex machina?William S.-Y. Wang - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):210.
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  • Not “pain and behavior” but pain in behavior.Patrick D. Wall - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):73-73.
  • No conscious or co-conscious?Graham F. Wagstaff - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):700-700.
  • The egg revealed.William S. Verplanck - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):605-606.
  • Is human information processing conscious?Max Velmans - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):651-69.
    Investigations of the function of consciousness in human information processing have focused mainly on two questions: (1) where does consciousness enter into the information processing sequence and (2) how does conscious processing differ from preconscious and unconscious processing. Input analysis is thought to be initially "preconscious," "pre-attentive," fast, involuntary, and automatic. This is followed by "conscious," "focal-attentive" analysis which is relatively slow, voluntary, and flexible. It is thought that simple, familiar stimuli can be identified preconsciously, but conscious processing is needed (...)
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  • Consciousness from a first-person perspective.Max Velmans - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):702-726.
    This paper replies to the first 36 commentaries on my target article on “Is human information processing conscious?” (Behavioral and Brain Sciences,1991, pp.651-669). The target article focused largely on experimental studies of how consciousness relates to human information processing, tracing their relation from input through to output, while discussion of the implications of the findings both for cognitive psychology and philosophy of mind was relatively brief. The commentaries reversed this emphasis, and so, correspondingly, did the reply. The sequence of topics (...)
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  • Attention is necessary for word integration.Geoffrey Underwood - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):698-698.
  • More on modularity.Carlo Umiltà - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):455-456.
  • The effect of sign language grammatical structure on recall.Ryan D. Tweney & Gary W. Heiman - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (4):331-334.
  • The reign of pain fails mainly in the brain.Dennis C. Turk & Peter Salovey - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):72-73.
  • Computation misrepresented: The procedural/declarative controversy exhumed.Henry Thompson - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):415.
  • A behavioral theory of mind?H. S. Terrace - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):569.
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  • Folk psychology: Simulation or tacit theory?Stephen Stich & Shaun Nichols - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (1-2):35-71.
    A central goal of contemporary cognitive science is the explanation of cognitive abilities or capacities. [Cummins 1983] During the last three decades a wide range of cognitive capacities have been subjected to careful empirical scrutiny. The adult's ability to produce and comprehend natural language sentences and the child's capacity to acquire a natural language were among the first to be explored. [Chomsky 1965, Fodor, Bever & Garrett 1974, Pinker 1989] There is also a rich literature on the ability to solve (...)
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  • Operant analysis of problem solving: Answers to questions you probably don't want to ask.Robert J. Sternberg - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):605-605.
  • LFG and psychological explanation.Mark Steedman - 1985 - Linguistics and Philosophy 8 (3):359 - 385.
  • Controlled versus automatic processing.Robert J. Sternberg - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):32-33.
  • Rule-governed behavior in computational psychology.Edward P. Stabler - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):604-605.
  • How are grammers represented?Edward P. Stabler - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):391-402.
    Noam Chomsky and other linguists and psychologists have suggested that human linguistic behavior is somehow governed by a mental representation of a transformational grammar. Challenges to this controversial claim have often been met by invoking an explicitly computational perspective: It makes perfect sense to suppose that a grammar could be represented in the memory of a computational device and that this grammar could govern the device's use of a language. This paper urges, however, that the claim that humans are such (...)
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  • Damn! There goes that ghost again!Keith E. Stanovich - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):696-698.
  • Computational theories and mental representation.Edward P. Stabler - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):416-421.
  • B. F. Skinner's theorizing.Douglas Stalker & Paul Ziff - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):569.
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  • Dissociating consciousness from cognition.David Spiegel - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):695-696.
  • A premature retreat to nativism.Jeffrey L. Sokolov & Catherine E. Snow - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):635-636.
  • Linguistics and psychology.Scott Soames - 1984 - Linguistics and Philosophy 7 (2):155 - 179.
  • Making up the brain's mind.Michael E. Smith - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):454-455.
  • Developing concepts of consciousness.Aaron Sloman - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):694-695.
  • Child language and the bioprogram.Dan I. Slobin - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):209.
  • Can Crain constrain the constraints?Dan I. Slobin - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):633-634.
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  • The operational analysis of psychological terms.B. F. Skinner - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):547.
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  • The operational analysis of psychological terms.B. F. Skinner - 1945 - Psychological Review 52 (4):270-78.
    The major contributions of operationism have been negative, largely because operationists failed to distinguish logical theories of reference from empirical accounts of language. Behaviorism never finished an adequate formulation of verbal reports and therefore could not convincingly embrace subjective terms. But verbal responses to private stimuli can arise as social products through the contingencies of reinforcement arranged by verbal communities.
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  • Is it behaviorism?B. F. Skinner - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):716-716.
  • Contingencies and rules.B. F. Skinner - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):607-613.
  • Coming to terms with private events.B. F. Skinner - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):572.
  • An operant analysis of problem solving.B. F. Skinner - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):583-591.
    Behavior that solves a problem is distinguished by the fact that it changes another part of the solver's behavior and is strengthened when it does so. Problem solving typically involves the construction of discriminative stimuli. Verbal responses produce especially useful stimuli, because they affect other people. As a culture formulates maxims, laws, grammar, and science, its members behave more effectively without direct or prolonged contact with the contingencies thus formulated. The culture solves problems for its members, and does so by (...)
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  • “Suspicion,” “fear,” “contamination,” “great dangers,” and behavioral fictions.Charles P. Shimp - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):715-716.
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