Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Autism, Empathy and Questions of Moral Agency.Timothy Krahn & Andrew Fenton - 2009 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (2):145-166.
    In moral psychology, it has long been argued that empathy is a necessary capacity of both properly developing moral agents and developed moral agency . This view stands in tension with the belief that some individuals diagnosed with autism—which is typically characterized as a deficiency in social reciprocity —are moral agents. In this paper we propose to explore this tension and perhaps trouble how we commonly see those with autism. To make this task manageable, we will consider whether high functioning (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Why Intuition?Jennifer Ellen Nado - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (1):15-41.
    In this paper I will argue that this entire dialectic is somewhat misguided. The mental states which are generally assumed to fall under the category of ‘intuition’ likely comprise a highly heterogeneous group; from the point of view of psychology or of neuroscience, in fact, ‘intuitions’ appear to be generated by several fundamentally different sorts of mental processes. If this is correct, then the term ‘intuition’ may simply carve things too broadly. I will argue that it is a mistake to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • Theories of Theories of Mind.Francesca Happé - 1996 - Mind and Language 11 (4):447-451.
  • From Brain Imaging Religious Experience to Explaining Religion: A Critique.Marc Slors & Nina Azari - 2007 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):67-86.
    Recent functional neuroimaging data, acquired in studies of religious experience, have been used to explain and justify religion and its origins. In this paper, we critique the move from describing brain activity associated with self-reported religious states, to explaining why there is religion at all. Toward that end, first we review recent neuroimaging findings on religious experience, and show how those results do not necessarily support a popular notion that religion has a primitive evolutionary origin. Importantly, we call into question (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • What is Self-Specific? Theoretical Investigation and Critical Review of Neuroimaging Results.Dorothée Legrand & Perrine Ruby - 2009 - Psychological Review 116 (1):252-282.
  • Reading Between the Lines: The Activation of Background Knowledge During Text Comprehension. [REVIEW]Fernando Marmolejo-Ramos, María Rosa Elosúa de Juan, Pascal Gygax, Carol J. Madden & Santiago Mosquera Roa - 2009 - Pragmatics and Cognition 17 (1):77-107.
    This paper presents an overview of the activation of background knowledge during text comprehension. We first review the cognitive processes involved in the activation of inferences during text comprehension, stressing the interaction between text and reader in the construction of situation models. Second, we review evidence for embodied theories of cognition and discuss how this new framework can inform our understanding of the nature and role of background knowledge. We then review the neuropsychological data on the activation of background knowledge (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • An Evolutionary Theory of Schizophrenia: Cortical Connectivity, Metarepresentation, and the Social Brain.Jonathan Kenneth Burns - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):831-855.
    Schizophrenia is a worldwide, prevalent disorder with a multifactorial but highly genetic aetiology. A constant prevalence rate in the face of reduced fecundity has caused some to argue that an evolutionary advantage exists in unaffected relatives. Here, I critique this adaptationist approach, and review – and find wanting – Crow's “speciation” hypothesis. In keeping with available biological and psychological evidence, I propose an alternative theory of the origins of this disorder. Schizophrenia is a disorder of the social brain, and it (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Understanding the Imitation Deficit in Autism May Lead to a More Specific Model of Autism as an Empathy Disorder.Tony Charman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):29-30.
    Preston & de Waal are understandably cautious in applying their model to autism. They emphasise multiple cognitive impairments in autism, including prefrontal-executive, cerebellar-attention, and amygdala-emotion recognition deficits. Further empirical examination of imitation ability in autism may reveal deficits in the neural and cognitive basis of perception-action mapping that have a specific relation to the empathic deficit.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Minds, Persons, and Space: An fMRI Investigation Into the Relational Complexity of Higher-Order Intentionality.Anna Abraham, Markus Werning, Hannes Rakoczy, D. Yves von Cramon & Ricarda I. Schubotz - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (2):438-450.
    Mental state reasoning or theory-of-mind has been the subject of a rich body of imaging research. Although such investigations routinely tap a common set of regions, the precise function of each area remains a contentious matter. With the help of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we sought to determine which areas are involved when processing mental state or intentional metarepresentations by focusing on the relational aspect of such representations. Using non-intentional relational representations such as spatial relations between persons and between (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Simulating Social Mind: The Role of the Mirror Neuron System and Simulation in the Social and Communicative Deficits of Autism Spectrum Disorders.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran - unknown
    The mechanism by which humans perceive others differs greatly from how humans perceive inanimate objects. Unlike inanimate objects, humans have the distinct property of being “like me” in the eyes of the observer. This allows us to use the same systems that process knowledge about self-performed actions, self-conceived thoughts, and self-experienced emotions to understand actions, thoughts, and emotions in others. The authors propose that internal simulation mechanisms, such as the mirror neuron system, are necessary for normal development of recognition, imitation, (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) of Intention-Based Emotion Attribution.Katrin Döhnel - unknown
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ‘Is Our Brain Hardwired to Produce God, Or is Our BrainHardwired to Perceive God.Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Andrew A. Fingelkurts - 2009 - Cognitive Processing 10 (4):293-326.
    To figure out whether the main empirical question “Is our brain hardwired to believe in and produce God, or is our brain hardwired to perceive and experience God?” is answered, this paper presents systematic critical review of the positions, arguments and controversies of each side of the neuroscientific-theological debate and puts forward an integral view where the human is seen as a psycho-somatic entity consisting of the multiple levels and dimensions of human existence (physical, biological, psychological, and spiritual reality), allowing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Simulationist Models of Face-Based Emotion Recognition.Alvin I. Goldman & Chandra Sekhar Sripada - 2005 - Cognition 94 (3):193-213.
    Recent studies of emotion mindreading reveal that for three emotions, fear, disgust, and anger, deficits in face-based recognition are paired with deficits in the production of the same emotion. What type of mindreading process would explain this pattern of paired deficits? The simulation approach and the theorizing approach are examined to determine their compatibility with the existing evidence. We conclude that the simulation approach offers the best explanation of the data. What computational steps might be used, however, in simulation-style emotion (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   96 citations  
  • Towards a Cognitive Neuroscience of Consciousness: Basic Evidence and a Workspace Framework.Stanislas Dehaene & Lionel Naccache - 2001 - Cognition 79 (1):1-37.
    This introductory chapter attempts to clarify the philosophical, empirical, and theoretical bases on which a cognitive neuroscience approach to consciousness can be founded. We isolate three major empirical observations that any theory of consciousness should incorporate, namely (1) a considerable amount of processing is possible without consciousness, (2) attention is a prerequisite of consciousness, and (3) consciousness is required for some specific cognitive tasks, including those that require durable information maintenance, novel combinations of operations, or the spontaneous generation of intentional (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   406 citations  
  • Self-Consciousness, Self-Agency, and Schizophrenia.Tilo T. J. Kircher & Dirk T. Leube - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):656-669.
    Empirical approaches on topics such as consciousness, self-awareness, or introspective perspective, need a conceptual framework so that the emerging, still unconnected findings can be integrated and put into perspective. We introduce a model of self-consciousness derived from phenomenology, philosophy, the cognitive, and neurosciences. We will then give an overview of research data on one particular aspect of our model, self-agency, trying to link findings from cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Finally, we will expand on pathological aspects of self-agency, and in particular (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Social Working Memory: Neurocognitive Networks and Directions for Future Research.Meghan L. Meyer & Matthew D. Lieberman - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
  • What Neurodevelopmental Disorders Can Reveal About Cognitive Architecture.Helen Tager-Flusberg - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen P. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. Oxford University Press. pp. 272--288.
    This chapter begins with an overview of the controversy surrounding the study of children and adults with neurodevelopmental disorders, and how these inform theories of neurocognitive architecture. It weighs the arguments for and against what we might learn from studying individuals who have fundamental biological impairments. It then discusses the example of research on theory of mind in two different disorders — autism and Williams syndrome — which has highlighted a number of important aspects of how this core cognitive capacity (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Posterior Cingulate, Precuneal and Retrosplenial Cortices: Cytology and Components of the Neural Network Correlates of Consciousness.B. A. Vogt & Steven Laureys - 2006 - In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
    Neuronal aggregates involved in conscious awareness are not evenly distributed throughout the CNS but comprise key components referred to as the neural network correlates of consciousness (NNCC). A critical node in this network is the posterior cingulate, precuneal, and retrosplenial cortices. The cytological and neurochemical composition of this region is reviewed in relation to the Brodmann map. This region has the highest level of cortical glucose metabolism and cytochrome c oxidase activity. Monkey studies suggest that the anterior thalamic projection likely (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Human Cognition During REM Sleep and the Activity Profile Within Frontal and Parietal Cortices: A Reappraisal of Functional Neuroimaging Data.Thanh Dang-Vu & Martin Desseilles - unknown
    In this chapter, we aimed at further characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of the human rapid eye movement (REM) sleep at the population level. We carried out a meta-analysis of a large dataset of positron emission tomography (PET) scans acquired during wakefulness, slow wave sleep and REM sleep, and focused especially on the brain areas in which the activity diminishes during REM sleep. Results show that quiescent regions are confined to the inferior and middle frontal cortex and to the inferior parietal (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Attention to Action and Awareness of Other Minds.Christopher D. Frith - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):481-487.
    We have only limited awareness of the system by which we control our actions and this limited awareness does not seem to be concerned with the control of action. Awareness of choosing one action rather than another comes after the choice has been made, while awareness of initiating an action occurs before the movement has begun. These temporal differences bind together in consciousness the intention to act and the consequences of the action. This creates our sense of agency. Activity in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Understanding Other Minds: A Criticism of Goldman’s Simulation Theory and an Outline of the Person Model Theory.Albert Newen & Tobias Schlicht - 2009 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 79 (1):209-242.
    What exactly do we do when we try to make sense of other people e.g. by ascribing mental states like beliefs and desires to them? After a short criticism of Theory-Theory, Interaction Theory and the Narrative Theory of understanding others as well as an extended criticism of the Simulation Theory in Goldman's recent version (2006), we suggest an alternative approach: the Person Model Theory . Person models are the basis for our ability to register and evaluate persons having mental as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Investigating the Neural and Cognitive Basis of Moral Luck: It’s Not What You Do but What You Know. [REVIEW]Liane Young, Shaun Nichols & Rebecca Saxe - 2010 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (3):333-349.
    Moral judgments, we expect, ought not to depend on luck. A person should be blamed only for actions and outcomes that were under the person’s control. Yet often, moral judgments appear to be influenced by luck. A father who leaves his child by the bath, after telling his child to stay put and believing that he will stay put, is judged to be morally blameworthy if the child drowns (an unlucky outcome), but not if his child stays put and doesn’t (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Personhood and Neuroscience: Naturalizing or Nihilating?Martha J. Farah & Andrea S. Heberlein - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):37-48.
    Personhood is a foundational concept in ethics, yet defining criteria have been elusive. In this article we summarize attempts to define personhood in psychological and neurological terms and conclude that none manage to be both specific and non-arbitrary. We propose that this is because the concept does not correspond to any real category of objects in the world. Rather, it is the product of an evolved brain system that develops innately and projects itself automatically and irrepressibly onto the world whenever (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  • Adaptive Domains of Deontic Reasoning.Laurence Fiddick - 2006 - Philosophical Explorations 9 (1):105 – 116.
    Deontic reasoning is reasoning about permission and obligation: what one may do and what one must do, respectively. Conceivably, people could reason about deontic matters using a purely formal deontic calculus. I review evidence from a range of psychological experiments suggesting that this is not the case. Instead, I argue that deontic reasoning is supported by a collection of dissociable cognitive adaptations for solving adaptive problems that likely would have confronted ancestral humans.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • An Outline of a Unified Theory of the Relational Self: Grounding the Self in the Manifold of Interpersonal Relations.Majid Beni - 2019 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):473-491.
    The paper outlines a structuralist unification between two existing relational theories of the self, i.e., Beni's Structural Realist theory of the Self and Gallese's Embodied Relational Self. Each one of these theories provides a structuralist account of some aspects of the self but leaves out some other aspects which are indispensable to a comprehensive account of the self. SRS accounts for the reflective aspects of the self, and ERS accounts for the environmental and social aspects of the self. In this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Taking the Scientist’s Perspective.Karen Larison - 2018 - Science & Education 27 (1-2):133-157.
    The Next Generation Science Standards mandates that schools provide students an understanding of the skills and knowledge that scientists use to engage in scientific practices. In this article, I argue that one of the best ways to accomplish this goal is to have students take the perspective of the scientist by reading nonfiction narratives written by scientists and science writers. I explore the anthropological and neurological evidence that suggests that perspective-taking is an essential component in the learning process. It has (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Distinct Neuronal Patterns of Positive and Negative Moral Processing in Psychopathy.Samantha J. Fede, Jana Schaich Borg, Prashanth K. Nyalakanti, Carla L. Hare, Lora M. Cope, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Mike Koenigs, Vince D. Calhoun & Kent A. Kiehl - 2016 - Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Neuroscience 16 (6):1074–1085.
    Psychopathy is a disorder characterized by severe and frequent moral violations in multiple domains of life. Numerous studies have shown psychopathy-related limbic brain abnormalities during moral processing; however, these studies only examined negatively valenced moral stimuli. Here, we aimed to replicate prior psychopathy research on negative moral judgments and to extend this work by examining psychopathy-related abnormalities in the processing of controversial moral stimuli and positive moral processing. Incarcerated adult males (N = 245) completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging protocol (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Deconstructing and Reconstructing Theory of Mind.Sara M. Schaafsma, Donald W. Pfaff, Robert P. Spunt & Ralph Adolphs - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):65-72.
    Usage of the term ‘theory of mind’ (ToM) has exploded across fields ranging from developmental psychology to social neuroscience and psychiatry research. However, its meaning is often vague and inconsistent, its biologi- cal bases are a subject of debate, and the methods used to study it are highly heterogeneous. Most crucially, its original definition does not permit easy downward translation to more basic processes such as those stud- ied by behavioral neuroscience, leaving the interpreta- tion of neuroimaging results opaque. We (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Time, Language and Flexibility of the Mind: The Role of Mental Time Travel in Linguistic Comprehension and Production.Francesco Ferretti & Erica Cosentino - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (1):24-46.
    According to Chomsky, creativity is a critical property of human language, particularly the aspect of ?the creative use of language? concerning the appropriateness to a situation. How language can be creative but appropriate to a situation is an unsolvable mystery from the Chomskyan point of view. We propose that language appropriateness can be explained by considering the role of the human capacity for Mental Time Travel at its foundation, together with social and ecological intelligences within a triadic language-grounding system. Our (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Differences Between Estimating Protagonists' Emotions and Evaluating Readers' Emotions in Narrative Comprehension.Hidetsugu Komeda, Miho Kawasaki, Kohei Tsunemi & Takashi Kusumi - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (1):135-151.
  • Psychosis and Autism as Diametrical Disorders of the Social Brain.Bernard Crespi & Christopher Badcock - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):241-261.
    Autistic-spectrum conditions and psychotic-spectrum conditions (mainly schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression) represent two major suites of disorders of human cognition, affect, and behavior that involve altered development and function of the social brain. We describe evidence that a large set of phenotypic traits exhibit diametrically opposite phenotypes in autistic-spectrum versus psychotic-spectrum conditions, with a focus on schizophrenia. This suite of traits is inter-correlated, in that autism involves a general pattern of constrained overgrowth, whereas schizophrenia involves undergrowth. These disorders also (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • Individual Differences in Reading Social Intentions From Motor Deviants.Daniel Lewkowicz, Francois Quesque, Yann Coello & Yvonne N. Delevoye-Turrell - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Cognitive Correlates of Different Mentalizing Abilities in Individuals with High and Low Trait Schizotypy: Findings From an Extreme-Group Design.Krisztina Kocsis-Bogár, Simone Kotulla, Susanne Maier, Martin Voracek & Kristina Hennig-Fast - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Theory-of-Mind in Individuals with Alström Syndrome is Related to Executive Functions, and Verbal Ability.Hans-Erik Frölander, Claes Möller, Mary Rudner, Sushmit Mishra, Jan D. Marshall, Heather Piacentini & Björn Lyxell - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Temporo-Parietal and Fronto-Parietal Lobe Contributions to Theory of Mind and Executive Control: An fMRI Study of Verbal Jokes.Yu-Chen Chan & Joseph P. Lavallee - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Reaction Time Advantage for Calculating Beliefs Over Public Representations Signals Domain Specificity for ‘Theory of Mind’.Adam S. Cohen & Tamsin C. German - 2010 - Cognition 115 (3):417-425.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Beyond Simulation–Theory and Theory–Theory: Why Social Cognitive Neuroscience Should Use its Own Concepts to Study “Theory of Mind”.Ian A. Apperly - 2008 - Cognition 107 (1):266-283.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • The Cost of Thinking About False Beliefs: Evidence From Adults’ Performance on a Non-Inferential Theory of Mind Task.Ian A. Apperly, Elisa Back, Dana Samson & Lisa France - 2008 - Cognition 106 (3):1093-1108.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • The Social Life of Cognition.Joanna Korman, John Voiklis & Bertram F. Malle - 2015 - Cognition 135:30-35.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Role of Control Functions in Mentalizing: Dual-Task Studies of Theory of Mind and Executive Function.Rebecca Bull, Louise H. Phillips & Claire A. Conway - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):663-672.
  • Toward an Etiology of Dissociative Identity Disorder: A Neurodevelopmental Approach.Kelly A. Forrest - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (3):259-293.
    This article elaborates on Putnam's ''discrete behavioral states'' model of dissociative identity disorder (Putnam, 1997) by proposing the involvement of the orbitalfrontal cortex in the development of DID and suggesting a potential neurodevelopmental mechanism responsible for the development of multiple representations of self. The proposed ''orbitalfrontal'' model integrates and elaborates on theory and research from four domains: the neurobiology of the orbitalfrontal cortex and its protective inhibitory role in the temporal organization of behavior, the development of emotion regulation, the development (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Factors Affecting Conscious Awareness in the Recollective Experience of Adults with Asperger’s Syndrome.Dermot M. Bowler, John M. Gardiner & Sebastian B. Gaigg - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (1):124-143.
    Bowler, Gardiner, and Grice have shown a small but significant impairment of autonoetic awareness or remembering involved in the episodic memory experiences of adults with Asperger’s syndrome. This was compensated by an increase in experiences of noetic awareness or knowing. The question remains as to whether the residual autonoetic awareness in Asperger individuals is qualitatively the same as that of typical comparison participants. Three experiments are presented in which manipulations that have shown differential effects on different kinds of conscious awareness (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • A Componential View of Theory of Mind: Evidence From Williams Syndrome.H. Tager-Flusberg - 2000 - Cognition 76 (1):59-90.
  • Functional Imaging of 'Theory of Mind'.Helen L. Gallagher & Christopher D. Frith - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):77-83.
  • What's HIDD'n in the HADD?Anders Lisdorf - 2007 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 7 (3-4):341-353.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • A Mechanistic Theory of Consciousness.Michael S. A. Graziano & Taylor W. Webb - 2014 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 6 (2):163-176.
    Recently we proposed a theory of consciousness, the attention schema theory, based on findings in cognitive psychology and systems neuroscience. In that theory, consciousness is an internal model o...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Comprehension Through Explanation as the Interaction of the Brain’s Coherence and Cognitive Control Networks.Jarrod Moss & Christian D. Schunn - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Self-Representation: Searching for a Neural Signature of Self-Consciousness.Albert Newen & Kai Vogeley - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):529-543.
    Human self-consciousness operates at different levels of complexity and at least comprises five different levels of representational processes. These five levels are nonconceptual representation, conceptual representation, sentential representation, meta-representation, and iterative meta-representation. These different levels of representation can be operationalized by taking a first-person-perspective that is involved in representational processes on different levels of complexity. We refer to experiments that operationalize a first-person-perspective on the level of conceptual and meta-representational self-consciousness. Interestingly, these experiments show converging evidence for a recruitment of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Attention to Action and Awareness of Other Minds.Chris Frith - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):481-487.
    We have only limited awareness of the system by which we control our actions and this limited awareness does not seem to be concerned with the control of action. Awareness of choosing one action rather than another comes after the choice has been made, while awareness of initiating an action occurs before the movement has begun. These temporal differences bind together in consciousness the intention to act and the consequences of the action. This creates our sense of agency. Activity in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Can Studies of Autism Teach Us About Consciousness of the Physical and the Mental?Simon Baron-Cohen - 1999 - Philosophical Explorations 2 (3):175-188.
    Most scientists and theorists concerned with the problem of consciousness focus on our consciousness of the physical world (our sensations, feelings, and awareness). In this paper I consider our consciousness of the mental world (our thoughts about thoughts, intentions, wishes, and emotions).The argument is made that these are two distinct forms of consciousness, the evidence for this deriving from studies of autism. Autism is a severe childhood psychiatric condition in which individuals may be conscious of the physical world but not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations