Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Politeness and reputation in cultural evolution.Roland Mühlenbernd, Sławomir Wacewicz & Przemysław Żywiczyński - 2021 - Linguistics and Philosophy 44 (6):1181-1213.
    Politeness in conversation is a fascinating aspect of human interaction that directly interfaces language use and human social behavior more generally. We show how game theory, as a higher-order theory of behavior, can provide the tools to understand and model polite behavior. The recently proposed responsibility exchange theory :313–344, 2019) describes how the polite communications of thanking and apologizing impact two different types of an agent’s social image: warmth and competence. Here, we extend this approach in several ways, most importantly (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Using a Relational Models Perspective to Understand Normatively Appropriate Conduct in Ethical Leadership.Steffen Giessner & Niels van Quaquebeke - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (S1):43 - 55.
    To describe leadership as ethical is largely a perceptional phenomenon informed by beliefs about what is normatively appropriate. Yet there is a remarkable scarcity in the leadership literature regarding how to define what is "normatively appropriate." To shed light on this issue, we draw upon Relational Models Theory (Fiske, 1992, Psychol Rev, 99:689-723), which differentiates between four types of relationships: communal sharing, authority ranking, equality matching, and market pricing. We describe how each of these relationship models dictates a distinct set (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Regulating Ethical Failures: Insights From Psychology.David De Cremer, Ann E. Tenbrunsel & Marius van Dijke - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (S1):1 - 6.
    Ethical failures are all around. Despite their pervasiveness, we know little how to manage and even survive the aftermath of such failures. In this paper, we develop the argument that as business ethics researchers we need to zoom in more closely on why ethical failures emerge, and how these insights can help us to be effective ethical leaders that can increase moral awareness and manage distrust. To succeed in this scientific enterprise, we advocate the use of a behavioral business ethics (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Exchange Relationships and the Environment: The Acceptability of Compensation in the Siting of Waste Disposal Facilities.Edmundo Claro - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (2):187-208.
    Within siting literature there is strong agreement that compensation for environmental risks is a necessary condition for local acceptance of waste treatment facilities. In-kind compensation is commonly pushed forward as being more effective than financial benefits in reducing local opposition. By forcusing on the siting of a sanitary landfill in Santiago, Chile, this paper explores the performance of both types of compensation and relates the analysis to the notion of social norms of exchange. These are understood as being based on (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Basic Values Predict Unethical Behavior in Sport: The Case of Athletes’ Doping Likelihood.Christopher Ring, Maria Kavussanu, Bahri Gürpınar, Jean Whitehead & Hannah Mortimer - 2022 - Ethics and Behavior 32 (1):90-98.
    ABSTRACT Although basic values have been linked with unethical attitudes and behavior in non-sport contexts, their association with doping in sport has yet to be established. We examined the relationships between basic values and doping likelihood. College athletes rated the importance of basic values using the Portrait Values Questionnaire Revised and indicated their likelihood of doping in a hypothetical scenario. In terms of basic value dimensions, self-enhancement values were positively related to doping likelihood, openness to change values were unrelated to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Toward a Role Ethical Theory of Right Action.Jeremy Evans & Michael Smith - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (3):599-614.
    Despite its prominence in traditional societies and its apparent commonsense appeal, the moral tradition of Role Ethics has been largely neglected in mainstream normative theory. Role Ethics is the view that the duties and/or virtues of social life are determined largely by the social roles we incur in the communities we inhabit. This essay aims to address two of the main challenges that hinder Role Ethics from garnering more serious consideration as a legitimate normative theory, namely that it is ill-suited (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Whistleblowing and the ‘Person-Situation’ Conundrum: What Matters More?Meenal Gakhar & Zubin R. Mulla - 2021 - Journal of Human Values 27 (3):247-260.
    This article extends the knowledge on whistleblowing by studying the impact of two individual antecedents and two situational factors (ethical leadership...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Socializing the Public: Invoking Hannah Arendt’s Critique of Modernity to Evaluate Reproductive Technologies. [REVIEW]Daniel Sperling - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (1):53-60.
    The article examines the writings of one of the most influential political philosophers, Hannah Arendt, and specifically focuses on her views regarding the distinction between the private and the public and the transformation of the public to the social by modernity. Arendt’s theory of human activity and critique of modernity are explored to critically evaluate the social contributions and implications of reproductive technologies especially where the use of such technologies is most dominant within Western societies. Focusing on empirical studies on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Understanding the Learning of Values Using a Domains-of-Socialization Framework.Julia Vinik, Megan Johnston, Joan E. Grusec & Renee Farrell - 2013 - Journal of Moral Education 42 (4):475-493.
    The narratives that emerging adults wrote about a time when they learned an important moral, value or lesson were explored in order to determine the characteristics of events that lead to internalized values as well as to compare the way different kinds of moral values are socialized. Lessons resulting from misbehavior were reported most frequently. Those involving direct teaching of values were most highly internalized, with internalization assessed by importance and current impact. Self-reflection and self-generation of values was identified as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Four Galore? The Overlap Between Mary Douglas’s Grid-Group Typology and Other Highly Cited Social Science Classifications.Marco Verweij, Petya Alexandrova, Henrik Jacobsen, Pauline Béziat, Diana Branduse, Yonca Dege, Jakob Hensing, James Hollway, Lea Kliem, Gabriela Ponce, Inga Reichelt & Mareile Wiegmann - 2020 - Sociological Theory 38 (3):263-294.
    Recently, neuroscientists have argued that elementary ways of organizing, perceiving, and justifying social relations lurk behind the diversity of social life. In developing grid-group typology, anthropologist Mary Douglas proposed such universal forms. If these are universal, then we could expect other widely cited classifications to overlap with grid-group typology. We tested this expectation by examining to which extent the elements of Douglas’s typology overlap with those of 39 highly influential classifications proposed since 1970. We established overlap by calculating the interrater (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “Economic Man” in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Behavioral Experiments in 15 Small-Scale Societies.Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, Ernst Fehr, Herbert Gintis, Richard McElreath, Michael Alvard, Abigail Barr, Jean Ensminger, Natalie Smith Henrich, Kim Hill, Francisco Gil-White, Michael Gurven, Frank W. Marlowe & John Q. Patton - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):795-815.
    Researchers from across the social sciences have found consistent deviations from the predictions of the canonical model of self-interest in hundreds of experiments from around the world. This research, however, cannot determine whether the uniformity results from universal patterns of human behavior or from the limited cultural variation available among the university students used in virtually all prior experimental work. To address this, we undertook a cross-cultural study of behavior in ultimatum, public goods, and dictator games in a range of (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   101 citations  
  • Admiration: A Conceptual Review.Diana Onu, Thomas Kessler & Joanne R. Smith - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (3):218-230.
    Admiration is thought to have essential functions for social interaction: it inspires us to learn from excellent models, to become better people, and to praise others and create social bonds. In intergroup relations, admiration for other groups leads to greater intergroup contact, cooperation, and help. Given these implications, it is surprising that admiration has only been researched by a handful of authors. In this article we review the literature, focusing on the definition of admiration, links to related emotions, measurement, antecedents, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Cuteness and Disgust: The Humanizing and Dehumanizing Effects of Emotion.Gary D. Sherman & Jonathan Haidt - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):245-251.
    Moral emotions are evolved mechanisms that function in part to optimize social relationships. We discuss two moral emotions— disgust and the “cuteness response”—which modulate social-engagement motives in opposite directions, changing the degree to which the eliciting entity is imbued with mental states (i.e., mentalized). Disgust-inducing entities are hypo-mentalized (i.e., dehumanized); cute entities are hyper-mentalized (i.e., “humanized”). This view of cuteness—which challenges the prevailing view that cuteness is a releaser of parental instincts (Lorenz, 1950/1971)—explains (a) the broad range of affiliative behaviors (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Filial Obligation in Contemporary China: Evolution of the Culture‐System.Xiaoying Qi - 2015 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 45 (1):141-161.
    Family obligation, which has an exceptionally high salience in traditional Chinese society, continues to be significant in contemporary China. In family relations in particular sentiments and practices morphologically similar to those associated with xiao remains intact in so far as an enduring set of expectations concerning age-based obligation continues to structure behavior toward others. Researchers pursuing the theme of “individualization” in Chinese society, on the other hand, argue that family obligations and filial sentiments have substantially weakened. The present paper will (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Cognitive Mechanisms of Ingroup/Outgroup Distinction.Alexander V. Shkurko - 2015 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 45 (2):188-213.
    People use social categories to perceive and interact with the social world. Different categorizations often share similar cognitive, affective and behavioral features. This leads to a hypothesis of the common representational forms of social categorization. Studies in social categorization often use the terms “ingroup” and “outgroup” without clear conceptualization of the terms. I argue that the ingroup/outgroup distinction should be treated as an elementary relational ego-centric form of social categorization based on specific cognitive mechanisms. Such an abstract relational form should (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Emotional Dog and Its Rational Tail: A Social Intuitionist Approach to Moral Judgment.Jonathan Haidt - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (4):814-834.
    Research on moral judgment has been dominated by rationalist models, in which moral judgment is thought to be caused by moral reasoning. The author gives 4 reasons for considering the hypothesis that moral reasoning does not cause moral judgment; rather, moral reasoning is usually a post hoc construction, generated after a judgment has been reached. The social intuitionist model is presented as an alternative to rationalist models. The model is a social model in that it deemphasizes the private reasoning done (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1240 citations  
  • Rationales for Indirect Speech: The Theory of the Strategic Speaker.James J. Lee & Steven Pinker - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (3):785-807.
    Speakers often do not state requests directly but employ innuendos such as Would you like to see my etchings? Though such indirectness seems puzzlingly inefficient, it can be explained by a theory of the strategic speaker, who seeks plausible deniability when he or she is uncertain of whether the hearer is cooperative or antagonistic. A paradigm case is bribing a policeman who may be corrupt or honest: A veiled bribe may be accepted by the former and ignored by the latter. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Moral Satisficing: Rethinking Moral Behavior as Bounded Rationality.Gerd Gigerenzer - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):528-554.
    What is the nature of moral behavior? According to the study of bounded rationality, it results not from character traits or rational deliberation alone, but from the interplay between mind and environment. In this view, moral behavior is based on pragmatic social heuristics rather than moral rules or maximization principles. These social heuristics are not good or bad per se, but solely in relation to the environments in which they are used. This has methodological implications for the study of morality: (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • A Biological Alternative to Moral Explanations.Joseph Millum - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):385-407.
    Some moral realists claim that moral facts are a species of natural fact, amenable to scientific investigation. They argue that these moral facts are needed in the best explanations of certain phenomena and that this is evidence that they are real. In this paper I present part of a biological account of the function of morality. The account allows the identification of a plausible natural kind that could play the explanatory role that a moral kind would play in naturalist realist (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Does the Modularity of Morals Have to Do With Ethics? Four Moral Sprouts Plus or Minus a Few.Owen Flanagan & Robert Anthony Williams - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):430-453.
    Flanagan (1991) was the first contemporary philosopher to suggest that a modularity of morals hypothesis (MMH) was worth consideration by cognitive science. There is now a serious empirically informed proposal that moral competence is best explained in terms of moral modules-evolutionarily ancient, fast-acting, automatic reactions to particular sociomoral experiences (Haidt & Joseph, 2007). MMH fleshes out an idea nascent in Aristotle, Mencius, and Darwin. We discuss the evidence for MMH, specifically an ancient version, “Mencian Moral Modularity,” which claims four innate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Social Origin and Moral Nature of Human Thinking.Jeremy I. M. Carpendale, Stuart I. Hammond & Charlie Lewis - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):334.
    Knobe's laudable conclusion that we make sense of our social world based on moral considerations requires a development account of human thought and a theoretical framework. We outline a view that such a moral framework must be rooted in social interaction.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Two Accounts of Moral Diversity: The Cognitive Science of Pluralism and Absolutism.John Bolender - 2004 - [Journal (on-Line/Unpaginated)] 3.
    Advances in cognitive science are relevant to the debate between moral pluralism and absolutism. Parametric structure, which plausibly underlies syntax, gives some idea of how pluralism might be true. The cognitive mechanisms underlying mathematical intelligence give some idea of how far absolutism is right. Advances in cognitive science should help us better understand the extent to which we are divided and how far we are potentially harmonious in our values.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Kinds of Norms.Elizabeth O'Neill - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (5):e12416.
    This article provides an overview of recent, empirically supported categorization schemes that have been proposed to distinguish different kinds of norms. Amongst these are the moral–conventional distinction and divisions within moral norms such as those proposed by moral foundations theory. I identify several dimensions along which norms have been and could usefully be categorized. I discuss some of the most prominent norm categorization proposals and the aims of these existing categorization schemes. I propose that we take a pluralistic approach toward (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Against the Odds: Human Values Arising in Unfavourable Circumstances Elicit the Feeling of Being Moved.Madelijn Strick & Jantine van Soolingen - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (6):1231-1246.
    ABSTRACTPeople sometimes say they are “moved” or “touched” by something. Although the experience is familiar to most, systematic research on being moved has just begun. The current research aims to advance our understanding of the prototypical elicitors of being moved. We tested the hypothesis that being moved is elicited by core values that manifest themselves in circumstances that are unfavourable to their emergence. In three experiments, two with text stimuli and one with pictorial stimuli, we found compelling evidence that the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Prospects for Direct Social Perception: A Multi-Theoretical Integration to Further the Science of Social Cognition.Travis J. Wiltshire, Emilio J. C. Lobato, Daniel S. McConnell & Stephen M. Fiore - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Beyond Prejudice: Are Negative Evaluations the Problem and is Getting Us to Like One Another More the Solution?John Dixon, Mark Levine, Steve Reicher, Kevin Durrheim, Dominic Abrams, Mark Alicke, Michal Bilewicz, Rupert Brown, Eric P. Charles & John Drury - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):411.
    For most of the history of prejudice research, negativity has been treated as its emotional and cognitive signature, a conception that continues to dominate work on the topic. By this definition, prejudice occurs when we dislike or derogate members of other groups. Recent research, however, has highlighted the need for a more nuanced and (Eagly 2004) perspective on the role of intergroup emotions and beliefs in sustaining discrimination. On the one hand, several independent lines of research have shown that unequal (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Spanning Our Differences: Moral Psychology, Physician Beliefs, and the Practice of Medicine.Ryan M. Antiel, Katherine M. Humeniuk & Jon C. Tilburt - 2014 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9:17.
    Moral pluralism is the norm in contemporary society. Even the best philosophical arguments rarely persuade moral opponents who differ at a foundational level. This has been vividly illustrated in contemporary debates in bioethics surrounding contentious issues such as abortion and euthanasia. It is readily apparent that bioethics discourse lacks an empirical explanation for the broad differences about various topics in bioethics and health policy. In recent years, social and cognitive psychology has generated novel approaches for defining basic differences in moral (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Ethics in Psychology and Law: An International Perspective.Alfred Allan - 2015 - Ethics and Behavior 25 (6):443-457.
    Some psychologists working in the psychology and law field feel that the profession does not provide them with adequate ethical guidance even though the field is arguably one of the oldest and best established applied fields of psychology. The uncertainty psychologists experience most likely stems from working with colleagues whose professional ethics differs from their own while providing services to demanding people and the many moral questions associated with the administration of law. I believe psychology’s ethics does, however, provide adequate (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Anger and Rank in Tonga and Germany: Cognition, Emotion, and Context.Andrea Bender, Hans Spada, Stefan Seitz, Hannah Swoboda & Simone Traber - 2007 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 35 (2):196-234.
  • Keeping Track: The Tracking and Identification of Human Agents.Anina N. Rich & Nicolas J. Bullot - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):560-566.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ethics in the Family Firm: Cohesion Through Reciprocity and Exchange.Rebecca G. Long & K. Michael Mathews - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (2):287-308.
    The ubiquity of family dominated firms in economies worldwide suggests that inquiry into the nature of the ethical frames of these types of firms is increasingly important. In the context of a social exchange approach and the norm of reciprocity, this manuscript addresses social cohesion in a dominant family firm coalition. It is argued that the factors underlying this cohesion, direct versus indirect reciprocity, shape unique attributes of family firms such as intentions for transgenerational sustainability, the pursuit of non-economic goals, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Politics of Folk Psychology: Believing What Others Believe.Uku Tooming - 2021 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 36 (3):361-374.
    In this paper, I argue that by attributing beliefs the attributer is pushed toward taking a stand on the content of those beliefs and that what stand they take partially depends on the relationship between the attributer and the attributee. In particular, if the attributee enjoys a higher social standing than the attributer, the latter is disposed to adopt the attributed belief, as long as certain other conditions are met. I will call this view the Adoption-by-Attribution model. Because of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Anger and Rank in Tonga and Germany: Cognition, Emotion, and Context.Andrea Bender, Hans Spada, Stefan Seitz, Hannah Swoboda & Simone Traber - 2007 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 35 (2):196-234.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Autistic Sociality.Elinor Ochs & Olga Solomon - 2010 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 38 (1):69-92.
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Navigating Between the Plots: A Narratological and Ethical Analysis of Business-Related Conspiracy Theories.Mathieu Alemany Oliver - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (2):265-288.
    This paper introduces the concept of business-related conspiracy theories. Drawing on Aristotelian virtue ethics and undertaking a narratological and ethical analysis of 28 BrCTs found online, I emphasize that BrCTs are narratives with structures rooted in other latent macro- and meta-narratives, including centuries-old myths. In particular, I reconstruct the fictional world of BrCTs – one in which CSR and social contracts have failed – before identifying eight different types of actors as which people can morally situate themselves in their relationships (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Decoding the Signal Effects of Job Candidate Attraction to Corporate Social Practices.Sarah Sorenson, James E. Mattingly & Felissa K. Lee - 2010 - Business and Society Review 115 (2):173-204.
  • Regional Cultural Differences and Ethical Perspectives Within the United States: Avoiding Pseudo‐Emic Ethics Research.Brent Macnab, Reginald Worthley & Steve Jenner - 2010 - Business and Society Review 115 (1):27-55.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Impact of Moral Motives on Economic Decision-Making.Katharina G. Kugler, Julia Reif, Gesa-Kristina Petersen & Felix C. Brodbeck - 2021 - Journal of Dynamic Decision Making 7.
    We examined the question of how “salient others” influence economic decisions. We proposed that moral motives actively shape economic decisions in social situations. In an experiment, we varied the decision situation and the moral motive. As hypothesized, moral motives influenced decision behavior only in social situations but not in non-social situations. In addition, we showed that in anonymous social one-shot situations, individuals are susceptible to situational moral motive framing. In contrast, situational cues were ineffective if a moral motive was already (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • An Empirical Investigation of Conflicting Relational Models as an Antecedent of Perceived (in)Justice and (Un)Cooperative Behavior at Work.Johannes Friedrich Walter Arendt - 2019 - Dissertation, Ludwig Maximilians Universität, München
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Genealogy of the Moral Modules.John Bolender - 2003 - Minds and Machines 13 (2):233-255.
    This paper defends a cognitive theory of those emotional reactions which motivate and constrain moral judgment. On this theory, moral emotions result from mental faculties specialized for automatically producing feelings of approval or disapproval in response to mental representations of various social situations and actions. These faculties are modules in Fodor's sense, since they are informationally encapsulated, specialized, and contain innate information about social situations. The paper also tries to shed light on which moral modules there are, which of these (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Digital Trust and Cooperation with an Integrative Digital Social Contract.Livia Levine - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (2):393-407.
    I argue for the role of trust and cooperation as part of the foundation of digital commerce by expanding the reach of the Integrative Social Contract Theory of Donaldson and Dunfee. I propose that a digital business community can be a community in the morally relevant ways that Donaldson and Dunfee describe, and that the basic framework of ISCT can apply to the digital business world similarly to its application in the offline business world. I then analyze the roles of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Mutualistic Approach to Morality: The Evolution of Fairness by Partner Choice.Nicolas Baumard, Jean-Baptiste André & Dan Sperber - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):59-122.
    What makes humans moral beings? This question can be understood either as a proximate question or as an ultimate question. The question is about the mental and social mechanisms that produce moral judgments and interactions, and has been investigated by psychologists and social scientists. The question is about the fitness consequences that explain why humans have morality, and has been discussed by evolutionary biologists in the context of the evolution of cooperation. Our goal here is to contribute to a fruitful (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   74 citations  
  • Moral Psychology and the Intuition That Pharmaceutical Companies Have a ‘Special’ Obligation to Society.James M. Huebner - 2014 - Journal of Buisness Ethics (3):1-10.
    Many people believe that the research-based pharmaceutical industry has a ‘special’ moral obligation to provide lifesaving medications to the needy, either free-ofcharge or at a reduced rate relative to the cost of manufacture. In this essay, I argue that we can explain the ubiquitous notion of a special moral obligation as an expression of emotionally charged intuitions involving sacred or protected values and an aversive response to betrayal in an asymmetric trust relationship. I then review the most common arguments used (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Applying Research Findings to Enhance Pre-Practicum Ethics Training.Alfred Allan - 2018 - Ethics and Behavior 28 (6):465-482.
    Professions have a social obligation to ensure that their members’ professional behavior is morally appropriate. The psychology profession in most jurisdictions delegates the responsibility of ensuring that psychologists entering the profession are ethically competent to pre-practicum training programs. Educators responsible for teaching the ethics courses in these programs often base them on Rest’s theory that does not take into account a vast amount of contemporary psychological and neuroscientific research data on moral decision making. My aim with this article is therefore (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Critical Realism and Economic Anthropology.John Harvey, Andrew Smith & David Golightly - 2017 - Journal of Critical Realism 16 (5):431-450.
    This paper discusses basic critical realism within the context of economic anthropology and develops an approach to studying material relations between people. A diachronic form of analysis, following the work of Bhaskar and Archer, is described as a practical means of analysing property rights. This new approach emphasises epistemic relativism and ontological realism in order to compare disparate forms of human interaction across cultures. The aim of doing this is to develop a philosophical framework that allows for the comparison of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What Early Sapiens Cognition Can Teach Us: Untangling Cultural Influences on Human Cognition Across Time.Andrea Bender - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Evidence of cultural influences on cognition is accumulating, but untangling these cultural influences from one another or from non-cultural influences has remained a challenging task. As between-group differences are neither a sufficient nor a necessary indicator of cultural impact, cross-cultural comparisons in isolation are unable to furnish any cogent conclusions. This shortfall can be compensated by taking a diachronic perspective that focuses on the role of culture for the emergence and evolution of our cognitive abilities. Three strategies for reconstructing early (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Wired for Society: Cognizing Pathways to Society and Culture.Laurence Kaufmann & Fabrice Clément - 2014 - Topoi 33 (2):459-475.
    While cognitive scientists increase their tentative incursions in the social domains traditionally reserved for social scientists, most sociologists and anthropologists keep decrying those attempts as reductionist or, at least, irrelevant. In this paper, we argue that collaboration between social and cognitive sciences is necessary to understand the impact of the social environment on the shaping of our mind. More specifically, we dwell on the cognitive strategies and early-developing deontic expectations, termed naïve sociology, which enable well-adapted individuals to constitute, maintain and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Would I Really Make a Difference? Moral Typecasting Theory and its Implications for Helping Ethical Leaders.Kai Chi Yam, Ryan Fehr, Tyler C. Burch, Yajun Zhang & Kurt Gray - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (3):675-692.
    Ethical leadership research has primarily relied on social learning and social exchange theories. Although these theories have been generative, additional theoretical perspectives hold the potential to broaden scholars’ understanding of ethical leadership’s effects. In this paper, we examine moral typecasting theory and its unique implications for followers’ leader-directed citizenship behavior. Across two studies employing both survey-based and experimental methods, we offer support for three key predictions consistent with this theory. First, the effect of ethical leadership on leader-directed citizenship behavior is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The “Social Brain,” Reciprocity, and Social Network Segregation along Ethnic Boundaries.Michael Windzio - 2020 - Human Nature 31 (4):443-461.
    How does segregation along ethnic boundaries emerge in social networks? Human evolution resulted in highly social beings, capable of prosociality, mindreading, and self-control, which are important aspects of the “social brain.” Our neurophysiologically “wired” social cognition implies different cognitive goal frames. In line with recent developments in behavioral theory, the present study defines network ties as episodes of social exchange. This dynamic definition can account for shifts in goal frames during an exchange episode: whereas deliberate choice and hedonic or gain (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “It’s Just Business”: Understanding How Business Frames Differ from Ethical Frames and the Effect on Unethical Behavior.McKenzie R. Rees, Ann E. Tenbrunsel & Kristina A. Diekmann - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-21.
    Unfortunately, business is often associated with unethical behavior. While research has offered a number of explanations for why business might encourage unethical behavior, we argue that how a person frames a situation may provide important insight. Drawing on the decision frame literature, the goal of the current research is to identify the differences in cognitive processing associated with two decision frames dominant in the business ethics literature—business and ethical—and, with that knowledge, examine ways to mitigate the detrimental influence of frame (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark