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  1. A Woman’s Work is… Unfinished Business: Justice for the Disappeared Magdalen Women of Modern Ireland.Kate Gleeson - 2017 - Feminist Legal Studies 25 (3):291-312.
    In this article I explore one core feature of contemporary campaigns for justice for Ireland’s Magdalen women concerning their deaths and disappearances, which continue to be denied by a State that has only recently started to acknowledge civilian deaths in other contexts such as armed conflict. I examine the treatment of the disappeared and deceased Magdalen women in the economic and political context of the Irish use of religious institutions and consider the significance of this regime for women’s citizenship in (...)
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  • Cheeky Witnessing.Ruth Fletcher - 2020 - Feminist Review 124 (1):124-141.
    Feminists witness legal worlds as they observe, document and share nothing less than the reproduction of life itself. The world of the abortion trail, where people and things move across borders to change life’s reproduction, has generated a rich variety of legal sources, figures and objects for feminist witnessing. In watching how feminist activists improvise with sources, figures and objects of legal consciousness on the abortion trail, this article seeks to contribute to critical understanding of a plurality of witnessing practice, (...)
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  • Abortion and Reproduction in Ireland: Shame, Nation-Building and the Affective Politics of Place.Clara Fischer - 2019 - Feminist Review 122 (2):32-48.
    In 2018, Irish citizens voted overwhelmingly to repeal the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution to allow for the introduction of a more liberal abortion law. In this article, I develop a retrospective reading of the stubborn persistence of the denial of reproductive rights to women in Ireland over the decades. I argue that the ban’s severity and longevity is rooted in deep-seated, affective attachments that formed part of processes of postcolonial nation-building and relied on shame and the construction of the (...)
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