Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Self, Me and I in the Repertoire of Spontaneously Occurring Altered States of Selfhood: Eight Neurophenomenological Case Study Reports.Andrew And Alexander Fingelkurts & Tarja Kallio-Tamminen - 2022 - Cognitive Neurodynamics 16:255–282.
    This study investigates eight case reports of spontaneously emerging, brief episodes of vivid altered states of Selfhood (ASoSs) that occurred during mental exercise in six long-term meditators by using a neurophenomenological electroencephalography (EEG) approach. In agreement with the neurophenomenological methodology, first-person reports were used to identify such spontaneous ASoSs and to guide the neural analysis, which involved the estimation of three operational modules of the brain self-referential network (measured by EEG operational synchrony). The result of such analysis demonstrated that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • What’s Special About ‘Not Feeling Like Oneself’? A Deflationary Account of Self(-Illness) Ambiguity.Roy Dings & Leon C. de Bruin - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations:1-21.
    The article provides a conceptualization of self ambiguity and investigates to what extent self ambiguity is ‘special’. First, we draw on empirical findings to argue that self-a...
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Temporally-Integrated Causality Landscape: Reconciling Neuroscientific Theories With the Phenomenology of Consciousness.Jesse J. Winters - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    In recent years, there has been a proliferation of neuroscientific theories of consciousness. These include theories which explicitly point to EM fields, notably Operational Architectonics and, more recently, the General Resonance Theory. In phenomenological terms, human consciousness is a unified composition of contents. These contents are specific and meaningful, and they exist from a subjective point of view. Human conscious experience is temporally continuous, limited in content, and coherent. Based upon those phenomenal observations, pre-existing theories of consciousness, and a large (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • How Do Living Systems Create Meaning?Chris Fields & Michael Levin - 2020 - Philosophies 5 (36):36-0.
    Meaning has traditionally been regarded as a problem for philosophers and psychologists. Advances in cognitive science since the early 1960s, however, broadened discussions of meaning, or more technically, the semantics of perceptions, representations, and/or actions, into biology and computer science. Here, we review the notion of “meaning” as it applies to living systems, and argue that the question of how living systems create meaning unifies the biological and cognitive sciences across both organizational and temporal scales.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation