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  1. Unintentional intentionality: art and design in the age of artificial intelligence.Kostas Terzidis, Filippo Fabrocini & Hyejin Lee - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-10.
    This paper presents an emerging aspect of intentionality through recent Artificial Intelligence developments in art and design. Our main thesis is that, if we focus just on the outcome of the artistic process, the intentionality of the artist does not have any relevance. Intention is measured as a result of actions regardless of whether they are human-based or not as long as there is an esthetical value intersubjectively acknowledged. In other words, what matters is the ‘intentio’ embedded in the work (...)
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  • AI Ethics and the Banality of Evil.Payman Tajalli - 2021 - Ethics and Information Technology 23 (3):447-454.
    In this paper, I draw on Hannah Arendt’s notion of ‘banality of evil’ to argue that as long as AI systems are designed to follow codes of ethics or particular normative ethical theories chosen by us and programmed in them, they are Eichmanns destined to commit evil. Since intelligence alone is not sufficient for ethical decision making, rather than strive to program AI to determine the right ethical decision based on some ethical theory or criteria, AI should be concerned with (...)
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  • Microdecisions and Autonomy in Self-Driving Cars: Virtual Probabilities.Florian Sprenger - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (2):619-634.
    To operate in an unpredictable environment, a vehicle with advanced driving assistance systems, such as a robot or a drone, not only needs to register its surroundings but also to combine data from different sensors into a world model, for which it employs filter algorithms. Such world models, as this article argues with reference to the SLAM problem in robotics, consist of nothing other than probabilities about states and events arising in the environment. The model, thus, contains a virtuality of (...)
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  • Artificial Intelligence in Cyber Physical Systems.Petar Radanliev, David De Roure, Max Van Kleek, Omar Santos & Uchenna Ani - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-14.
    This article conducts a literature review of current and future challenges in the use of artificial intelligence in cyber physical systems. The literature review is focused on identifying a conceptual framework for increasing resilience with AI through automation supporting both, a technical and human level. The methodology applied resembled a literature review and taxonomic analysis of complex internet of things interconnected and coupled cyber physical systems. There is an increased attention on propositions on models, infrastructures and frameworks of IoT in (...)
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  • Beyond Human: Deep Learning, Explainability and Representation.M. Beatrice Fazi - forthcoming - Theory, Culture and Society:026327642096638.
    This article addresses computational procedures that are no longer constrained by human modes of representation and considers how these procedures could be philosophically understood in terms of ‘algorithmic thought’. Research in deep learning is its case study. This artificial intelligence technique operates in computational ways that are often opaque. Such a black-box character demands rethinking the abstractive operations of deep learning. The article does so by entering debates about explainability in AI and assessing how technoscience and technoculture tackle the possibility (...)
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  • Do submarines swim? Methodological dualism and anthropomorphizing AlphaGo.Vincent J. Carchidi - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-13.
    The victories of the Go-playing artificial intelligence “AlphaGo” against professional player Lee Sedol in 2016 had a profound impact on public and academic perceptions of AI. This event shocked observers, as the ability of a machine to defeat a world champion human in a highly complex game seemed to indicate that a machine had achieved human-like—or more than human—intelligence. But why was AlphaGo so readily anthropomorphized by academic and non-academic audiences alike? Drawing from existing analyses of reactions to and arguments (...)
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