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  1. Patient Expectations in Placebo‐Controlled Randomized Clinical Trials.David A. Stone, Catherine E. Kerr, Eric Jacobson, Lisa A. Conboy ScD & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2005 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 11 (1):77-84.
  • The Placebo Effect: What's Interesting for Scholars of Religion?Anne Harrington - 2011 - Zygon 46 (2):265-280.
    Abstract. The placebo effect these days is no longer merely the insubstantial, subjective response that some patients have to a sham treatment, like a sugar pill. It has been reconceived as a powerful mind-body phenomenon. Because of this, it has also emerged as a complex reference point in a number of high-stakes conversations about the metaphysical significance of experiences of religious healing, the possible health benefits of being religious, and the feasibility of using double-blind placebo-controlled trials to investigate the efficacy (...)
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  • A Critical Evaluation of the Theory and Practice of Therapeutic Touch.Dónal P. O'Mathúna, Steven Pryjmachuk, Wayne Spencer, Michael Stanwick & Stephen Matthiesen - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (2):163-176.
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  • The Impact of Psychological Factors on Placebo Responses in a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Sham Device to Dummy Pill.Suzanne M. Bertisch, Anna R. T. Legedza, Russell S. Phillips, Roger B. Davis, William B. Stason, Rose H. Goldman & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):14-19.
  • After Placebo: In Medical Research and Clinical Practice R.Nunn, ArjanaMedia 2015.Cosima Locher, Jens Gaab, Michael Loughlin & Charlotte Blease - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):1265-1267.
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  • An Enactive Account of Placebo Effects.Giulio Ongaro & Dave Ward - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (4):507-533.
    Placebos are commonly defined as ineffective treatments. They are treatments that lack a known mechanism linking their properties to the properties of the condition on which treatment aims to intervene. Given this, the fact that placebos can have substantial therapeutic effects looks puzzling. The puzzle, we argue, arises from the relationship placebos present between culturally meaningful entities, our intentional relationship to the environment and bodily effects. How can a mere attitude toward a treatment result in appropriate bodily changes? We argue (...)
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  • Sterility and Suggestion: Minor Psychotherapy in the Soviet Union, 1956–1985.Aleksandra Brokman - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (4):83-106.
    This article explores the concept of minor or general psychotherapy championed by physicians seeking to popularise psychotherapy in the post-Stalin Soviet Union. Understood as a set of skills and principles meant to guide behaviour towards and around patients, this form of psychotherapy was portrayed as indispensable for physicians of all specialities as well as for all personnel of medical institutions. This article shows how, as a result of Soviet teaching on the power of suggestion to influence human organisms, every interaction (...)
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  • Talking Therapy: The Allopathic Nihilation of Homoeopathy Through Conceptual Translation and a New Medical Language.Lyn Brierley-Jones - 2021 - History of the Human Sciences 34 (3-4):121-141.
    The 19th century saw the development of an eclectic medical marketplace in both the United Kingdom and the United States, with mesmerists, herbalists and hydrotherapists amongst the plethora of medical ‘sectarians’ offering mainstream medicine stiff competition. Foremost amongst these competitors were homoeopaths, a group of practitioners who followed Samuel Hahnemann in prescribing highly dilute doses of single-drug substances at infrequent intervals according to the ‘law of similars’. The theoretical sophistication of homoeopathy, compared to other medical sectarian systems, alongside its institutional (...)
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  • From Medicine to Psychotherapy: The Placebo Effect.Stewart Justman - 2011 - History of the Human Sciences 24 (1):95-107.
    If placebos have been squeezed out of medicine to the point where their official place is in clinical trials designed to identify their own confounding effect, the placebo effect nevertheless thrives in psychotherapy. Not only does psychotherapy dispose of placebo effects that are less available to medicine as it becomes increasingly technological and preoccupied with body parts, but factors of the sort inhibiting the use of placebos in medicine have no equivalent in psychology. Medicine today is disturbed by the placebo (...)
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  • Book Review After Placebo: In Medical Research and Clinical Practice R.Nunn, ArjanaMedia 2015. [REVIEW]Cosima Locher, Jens Gaab, Michael Loughlin & Charlotte Blease - forthcoming - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.
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  • The Placebo Puzzle: Examining the Discordant Space Between Biomedical Science and Illness/Healing.Shawn Pohlman, Nancy J. Cibulka, Janice L. Palmer, Rebecca A. Lorenz & Lee SmithBattle - 2013 - Nursing Inquiry 20 (1):71-81.
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  • The Moral Case for the Clinical Placebo.Azgad Gold & Pesach Lichtenberg - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):219-224.
    Placebos are arguably the most commonly prescribed drug, across cultures and throughout history. Nevertheless, today many would consider their use in the clinic unethical, since placebo treatment involves deception and the violation of patients’ autonomy. We examine the placebo's definition and its clinical efficacy from a biopsychosocial perspective, and argue that the intentional use of the placebo and placebo effect, in certain circumstances and under several conditions, may be morally acceptable. We highlight the role of a virtue-based ethical orientation and (...)
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  • Can I Author Myself? The Limits of Transformation.Stewart Justman - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (5):511-528.
    Narrative medicine is predicated on the importance of narrative to human life. Although that in itself is not controversial, an extension of this principle that has sprung up in narrative psychiatry—namely, that by coming to imagine a different life story one can become a different person—ought to be. One reason one cannot remake one’s life in the image of a story is that life is not to be mistaken for a story in the first place. The seminal study of psychotherapy, (...)
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  • The Use of the Placebo Effect in Clinical Medicine — Ethical Blunder or Ethical Imperative?Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):43-50.
    The current debate in medical ethics on placebos focuses mainly on their use in health research. Whereas this is certainly an important topic the discussion tends to overlook another longstanding but nevertheless highly relevant question, namely if and how the placebo effect should be employed in clinical practice. This paper describes the way the placebo effect is perceived in modern medicine and offers some historical reflections on how these perceptions have developed; discusses elements of a definition of the placebo effect; (...)
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