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  1. Business and Human Rights: A Configurational View of the Antecedents of Human Rights Infringements by Emerging Market Firms.Luciano Ciravegna & Federica Nieri - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (2):431-450.
    This study investigates the antecedents of human rights infringements by emerging market firms. We used fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis to examine HRIs in 245 firms based in eight emerging markets, between 2003 and 2012. Our findings disclose three equifinal configurations of high levels of HRIs, all involving EFs that have expanded to a high number of foreign markets: large, old, low performing state-owned enterprises operating in high quality institutions’ home and host markets, small, young, over-performing EFs operating in low (...)
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  • Revisiting the Effect of Family Involvement on Corporate Social Responsibility: A Behavioral Agency Perspective.Victor Cui, Shujun Ding, Mingzhi Liu & Zhenyu Wu - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (1):291-309.
    This paper sheds light on the incongruent findings concerning the relationship between family involvement and firms’ corporate social responsibility. While prior studies have mainly taken the perspective of families’ socioemotional wealth preservation, we approach this relationship from the perspective of behavioral agency theory, highlighting the important role played by CEOs’ family memberships. Specifically, we posit that family firms are more likely to invest in CSR when their CEOs are members of the controlling families. Furthermore, we examine how family firms can (...)
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  • An Assessment of the Association Between Renewable Energy Utilization and Firm Financial Performance.Hyunju Shin, Alexander E. Ellinger, Helenka Hopkins Nolan, Tyler D. DeCoster & Forrest Lane - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (4):1121-1138.
    Contemporary research highlights multiple societal and environmental benefits in addition to potential economic advantages associated with renewable energy utilization. As federal and state incentives for investments in RE technologies become more prevalent, RE sources represent increasingly viable alternatives to established fossil fuel energy. RE utilization is recognized as a key component of “green” product innovation that helps firms reduce the environmental impact of production processes and diminish their ecological footprints and energy consumption. Yet, despite consistent evidence that corporate sustainability initiatives (...)
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  • Individuals’ Perceptions of the Legitimacy of Emerging Market Multinationals: Ethical Foundations and Construct Validation.Jianhong Zhang, David L. Deephouse, Désirée van Gorp & Haico Ebbers - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):801-825.
    Entry of new organizations, including multinational enterprises from emerging markets, raises the ethical question of will they benefit society. The concept of legitimacy answers this question because it is the overall assessment of the appropriateness of organizational ends and means. Moreover, gaining legitimacy enables EMNEs to succeed in new host countries. Past work examined collective level indicators of the legitimacy of MNEs, but recent research recognizes the importance of individuals’ perceptions as the micro-foundation of legitimacy. This study first uses new (...)
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  • The Multinational Corporation as a Political Actor: ‘Varieties of Capitalism’ Revisited.David Detomasi - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (3):685-700.
    This paper argues that the literature examining the role that MNCs play in ‘political CSR’—an emerging area of management research concern—can be enhanced by more a fulsome examination of the ‘varieties of capitalism’ that currently exist in the global economy. We argue that the willingness and capacity of a particular MNC to participate in governance activity—which we broadly equate to political CSR—are contingent, at least in part, upon the national systems of government-business relations present in its home market. We argue (...)
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  • Collectively Designing CSR Through Meta-Organizations: A Case Study of the Oil and Gas Industry.Hervé Dumez, Marcelo Bucheli & Heloïse Berkowitz - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (4):753-769.
    Few industries have been pressured to develop corporate social responsibility standards and policies like oil and gas. This has translated into the creation of non-governmental organizations and branches of the oil and gas firms focused on CSR. However, given the intrinsic complex characteristics of this industry, its global reach, and the fact that its operations affect and involve a wide variety of stakeholders, CSR issues cannot be defined and implemented exclusively at the industry or firm levels, but require the participation (...)
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  • Sustainability in the Face of Institutional Adversity: Market Turbulence, Network Embeddedness, and Innovative Orientation.Dirk De Clercq, Narongsak Thongpapanl & Maxim Voronov - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (2):437-455.
    Drawing from research on strategic choice, this study investigates the relationship between market turbulence and firms’ sustainable behavior, in the context of sustainability-related institutional adversity. It argues that the relationship between market turbulence and sustainability is mediated by network embeddedness, and this mediating role in turn is moderated by a firm’s innovative orientation. Data collected from a sample of Ontario restaurants inform predictions about firms’ propensity to adopt local wines in their portfolios, despite the limited market and normative support that (...)
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  • The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility Performance Feedback on Corporate Social Responsibility Performance.Jae-Eun Lee & Young Soo Yang - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    This study empirically analyzes how corporate social responsibility performance feedback impacts CSR performance, focusing on the performance feedback perspective of behavioral theory of the firm. By performing generalized least squares regression analysis based on Korean company data from 2012 to 2019, we presented evidence that positive social and historical performance feedback had a positive effect on CSR performance. Our results provide evidence that firms with higher social and historical CSR performance than CSR aspiration may have higher CSR performance than those (...)
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  • Theoretical Insights of CSR Research in Communication from 1980 to 2018: A Bibliometric Network Analysis.Yi Grace Ji, Weiting Tao & Hyejoon Rim - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):327-349.
    Communication, as a discipline that generates a rich body of literature on CSR, has become a critical contributor to CSR knowledge in social science. However, limited research exists to understand how CSR knowledge is constructed and diffused in the discipline. This study thus intends to unpack the knowledge construction process of CSR research in the communication discipline from a network perspective. Invisible college was adopted as the conceptual framework. Article and theory/concept networks were constructed with 290 peer-reviewed articles from 61 (...)
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  • Be Bad but Look Good: Can Controversial Industries Enhance Corporate Reputation Through CSR Initiatives?Claudio Aqueveque, Pablo Rodrigo & Ignacio J. Duran - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (3):222-237.
    Even though the link between perceived corporate social responsibility fit and corporate reputation has received much attention from scholars, this tradition has ignored that the underpinnings of this association vary depending on the particular characteristics of each industry under study. To delve into this matter, we investigate in the increasingly relevant context of controversial industries how PCSR-fit could enhance corporate reputation and which are the mediating mechanisms of this association. Our academic contribution is twofold. First, we find that controversial sectors (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Implementation: A Review and a Research Agenda Towards an Integrative Framework.Tahniyath Fatima & Said Elbanna - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    In spite of accruing concerted scholarly and managerial interest since the 1950s in corporate social responsibility, its implementation is still a growing topic as most of it remains academically unexplored. As CSR continues to establish a stronger foothold in organizational strategies, understanding its implementation is needed for both academia and industry. In an attempt to respond to this need, we carry out a systematic review of 122 empirical studies on CSR implementation to provide a status quo of the literature and (...)
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  • Are Algorithmic Decisions Legitimate? The Effect of Process and Outcomes on Perceptions of Legitimacy of AI Decisions.Kirsten Martin & Ari Waldman - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Firms use algorithms to make important business decisions. To date, the algorithmic accountability literature has elided a fundamentally empirical question important to business ethics and management: Under what circumstances, if any, are algorithmic decision-making systems considered legitimate? The present study begins to answer this question. Using factorial vignette survey methodology, we explore the impact of decision importance, governance, outcomes, and data inputs on perceptions of the legitimacy of algorithmic decisions made by firms. We find that many of the procedural governance (...)
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  • Building Ethical Narratives: The Audiences for AICPA Editorials.Dean Neu & Gregory D. Saxton - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    This study examines how the American Institute of Certified Professional Accountants uses character and concept words to communicate normative narratives to different internal audiences. Our analysis of 552 editorials published in the AICPA’s Journal of Accountancy during the 1916–1973 period illustrates how the AICPA communicated similar yet different normative narratives to firm partners and students. During this time period, the centrality of ethically infused words such as ethics, conduct, and independence not only varied across different time periods but also across (...)
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  • Does It Really Pay to Be Good, Everywhere? A First Step to Understand the Corporate Social and Financial Performance Link in Latin American Controversial Industries.Pablo Rodrigo, Ignacio J. Duran & Daniel Arenas - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (3):286-309.
    Most research studying the corporate social performance –corporate financial performance link has utilized developed country samples. Also, this literature has generally focused on a wide variety of industries, ignoring the fact that certain sectors – such as controversial industries – have graver social and environmental issues. Hence, a gap exists in this tradition when it comes to emerging markets and controversial industries. This paper attempts to fill this void by providing preliminary evidence and insight on the matter. Based on an (...)
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  • Assessing UNGC Pharmaceutical Signatories Stakeholders Using Big Data.Ivana Zilic, Helen LaVan & Lori S. Cook - 2019 - Business and Society Review 124 (2):201-217.
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  • Socially Responsible Consumption in Russia: Testing the Theory of Planned Behavior and the Moderating Role of Trust.Irina Petrovskaya & Fazli Haleem - 2021 - Business Ethics: A European Review 30 (1):38-53.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  • Gaining Legitimacy Through CSR: An Analysis of Turkey's 30 Largest Corporations.Emel Ozdora-Aksak & Sirin Atakan-Duman - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (3):238-257.
    Grounded in institutional theory, this study provides an overview of the corporate social responsibility initiatives of Turkey's 30 largest corporations through a thematic content analysis. The study focuses on the G-20 member Turkey and investigates the influence of isomorphism mechanisms on the adoption of CSR initiatives in a developing country context. The aim of this study is to integrate Carroll's CSR dimensions, the type of CSR engagement and coercive, mimetic and normative isomorphism mechanisms proposed by institutional theory. Through this integration (...)
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  • Attraction or Distraction? Corporate Social Responsibility in Macao’s Gambling Industry.Tiffany Cheng Han Leung & Robin Stanley Snell - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (3):637-658.
    This paper attempts to investigate how and why organisations in Macao’s gambling industry engage in corporate social responsibility. It is based on an in-depth investigation of Macao’s gambling industry with 49 semi-structured interviews, conducted in 2011. We found that firms within the industry were emphasising pragmatic legitimacy based on both economic and non-economic contributions, in order to project positive images of the industry, while glossing over two domains of adverse externalities: problem gambling among visitors, and the pollution and despoliation of (...)
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  • From Board Composition to Corporate Environmental Performance Through Sustainability-Themed Alliances.Corinne Post, Noushi Rahman & Cathleen McQuillen - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):423-435.
    A growing body of work suggests that the presence of women and of independent directors on boards of directors is associated with higher corporate environmental performance. However, the mechanisms linking board composition to corporate environmental performance are not well understood. This study proposes and empirically tests the mediating role of sustainability-themed alliances in the relationship between board composition and corporate environmental performance. Using the population of public oil and gas firms in the United States as the sample, the study relies (...)
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  • A Comparison of Canadian and U.S. CSR Strategic Alliances, CSR Reporting, and CSR Performance: Insights Into Implicit–Explicit CSR.Linda Thorne, Lois S. Mahoney, Kristen Gregory & Susan Convery - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):85-98.
    We considered the question of how corporate social responsibility differs between Canada and the U.S. Prior research has identified that national institutional differences exist between the two countries [Freeman and Hasnaoui, J Business Ethics 100:419–443, 2011], which may be associated with variations in their respective CSR practices. Matten and Moon [Acad Manag Rev 33:404–424, 2008] suggested that cross-national differences in firms’ CSR are depicted by an implicit–explicit conceptual framework: explicit CSR practices are deliberate and more strategic than implicit CSR practices. (...)
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  • Legitimacy-Seeking Organizational Strategies in Controversial Industries: A Case Study Analysis and a Bidimensional Model.Jon Reast, François Maon, Adam Lindgreen & Joëlle Vanhamme - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):139-153.
    Controversial industry sectors, such as alcohol, gambling, and tobacco, though long-established, suffer organizational legitimacy problems. The authors consider various strategies used to seek organizational legitimacy in the U.K. casino gambling market. The findings are based on a detailed, multistakeholder case study pertaining to a failed bid for a regional supercasino. They suggest four generic strategies for seeking organizational legitimacy in this highly complex context: construing, earning, bargaining, and capturing, as well as pathways that combine these strategies. The case analysis and (...)
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  • The Corporate Social Performance of Developing Country Multinationals.Stelios Zyglidopoulos, Peter Williamson & Pavlos Symeou - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (3):379-406.
    ABSTRACT:In this article, we explore the Corporate Social Performance of Developing Country Multinationals. We argue that in competing internationally, DMNCs often face both reputation and legitimacy deficits, which they address by improving their CSP. We develop a series of hypotheses to explain the variation in CSP between DMNCs and domestic-only firms from developing countries and also examine variations in CSP between DMNCs depending on the extent of their multinationality and portfolio of host countries. Our findings support all our hypotheses, which (...)
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  • Towards Enforceable Bans on Illicit Businesses: From Moral Relativism to Human Rights.Edmund F. Byrne - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):119-130.
    Many scholars and activists favor banning illicit businesses, especially given that such businesses constitute a large part of the global economy. But these businesses are commonly operated as if they are subject only to the ethical norms their management chooses to recognize, and as a result they sometimes harm innocent people. This can happen in part because there are no effective legal constraints on illicit businesses, and in part because it seems theoretically impossible to dispose definitively of arguments that support (...)
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  • The Effect of Values on the Attractiveness of Responsible Employers for Young Job Seekers.Silke Bustamante, Rudi Ehlscheidt, Andrea Pelzeter, Andreas Deckmann & Franziska Freudenberger - 2020 - Journal of Human Values 27 (1):27-48.
    Purpose: Empirical studies suggest that corporate social responsibility impacts young job seekers’ choices of an employer. Values seem to affect CSR preferences, influencing the felt fit between the person and the organization and hereby the valence of working for that company. This article aims to research in more detail the preference structure of young graduate job seekers. In particular, it seeks to understand whether CSR is important when there is a trade-off between CSR and non-CSR attributes and whether basic value (...)
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  • Coalitions and Public Action in the Reshaping of Corporate Responsibility: The Case of the Retail Banking Industry.Marta de la Cuesta-González, Julie Froud & Daniel Tischer - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (3):539-558.
    This paper addresses the question of whether and how public action via civil society and/or government can meaningfully shape industry-wide corporate responsibility behaviour. We explore how, in principle, ICR can come about and what conditions might be effective in promoting more ethical behaviour. We propose a framework to understand attempts to develop more responsible behaviour at an industry level through processes of negotiation and coalition building. We suggest that any attempt to meaningfully influence ICR would require stakeholders to possess both (...)
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  • Responding to Diffused Stakeholders on Social Media: Connective Power and Firm Reactions to CSR-Related Twitter Messages.Gregory D. Saxton, Charlotte Ren & Chao Guo - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (2):229-252.
    Social media offers a platform for diffused stakeholders to interact with firms—alternatively praising, questioning, and chastising businesses for their CSR performance and seeking to engage in two-way dialogue. In 2014, 163,402 public messages were sent to Fortune 200 firms’ CSR-focused Twitter accounts, each of which was either shared, replied to, “liked,” or ignored by the targeted firm. This paper examines firm reactions to these messages, building a model of firm response to stakeholders that combines the notions of CSR communication and (...)
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  • (In)Effective Business Responsibility Engagements in Areas of Limited Statehood: Nigeria’s Oil Sector as a Case Study.Uchechukwu Nwoke - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (7):1606-1642.
    In reality, most state actors—especially those in the developing world—are usually incapable of effectively governing all facets of their territory. This has necessitated the intervention of non-state actors, who through their social responsibility engagements act as functional equivalents to state-driven government. Using empirical data, this article evaluates the “governance” interventions of corporations in the oil industry in Nigeria’s Delta region. While arguing that the area qualifies as an area of limited statehood, the article asserts that corporate social responsibility practices that (...)
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  • The Corporate Social Responsibility Information Environment: Examining the Value of Financial Analysts’ Recommendations.Changhee Lee, Dan Palmon & Ari Yezegel - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):279-301.
    This study examines the relationship between corporate social responsibility -related information and the value of financial analysts’ stock recommendations. The information environment in which analysts operate in is affected by CSR-related reports that companies voluntarily issue as well as information that becomes available through third-party analysis and rating institutions. We find an inverse relationship between the value of both upgrade and downgrade revisions and the supply of CSR-related information compiled by third-party institutions, suggesting that CSR-related data are associated with a (...)
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  • Drilling Their Own Graves: How the European Oil and Gas Supermajors Avoid Sustainability Tensions Through Mythmaking.George Ferns, Kenneth Amaeshi & Aliette Lambert - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (1):201-231.
    This study explores how paradoxical tensions between economic growth and environmental protection are avoided through organizational mythmaking. By examining the European oil and gas supermajors’ “CEO-speak” about climate change, we show how mythmaking facilitates the disregarding, diverting, and/or displacing of sustainability tensions. In doing so, our findings further illustrate how certain defensive responses are employed: regression, or retreating to the comforts of past familiarities, fantasy, or escaping the harsh reality that fossil fuels and climate change are indeed irreconcilable, and projecting, (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Financial Performance: The Mediating Role of Productivity.Iftekhar Hasan, Nada Kobeissi, Liuling Liu & Haizhi Wang - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (3):671-688.
    This study treats firm productivity as an accumulation of productive intangibles and posits that stakeholder engagement associated with better corporate social performance helps develop such intangibles. We hypothesize that because shareholders factor improved productive efficiency into stock price, productivity mediates the relationship between corporate social and financial performance. Furthermore, we argue that key stakeholders’ social considerations are more valuable for firms with higher levels of discretionary cash and income stream uncertainty. Therefore, we hypothesize that those two contingencies moderate the mediated (...)
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  • Instrumental and/or Deliberative? A Typology of CSR Communication Tools.Peter Seele & Irina Lock - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (2):401-414.
    Addressing the critique that communication activities with regard to CSR are often merely instrumental marketing or public relation tools, this paper develops a toolbox of CSR communication that takes into account a deliberative notion. We derive this toolbox classification from the political approach of CSR that is based on Habermasian discourse ethics and show that it has a communicative core. Therefore, we embed CSR communication within political CSR theory and extend it by Habermasian communication theory, particularly the four validity claims (...)
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  • The Legitimacy of CSR Actions of Publicly Traded Companies Versus Family-Owned Companies.Rajat Panwar, Karen Paul, Erlend Nybakk, Eric Hansen & Derek Thompson - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (3):1-16.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is one of the ways through which companies gain legitimacy. However, CSR actions themselves are subject to public skepticism because of increased public awareness of greenwashing and scandalous corporate behavior. Legitimacy of CSR actions is indeed influenced by the actions of the company but also is rooted in the basic cultural values of a society and in the ideologies of evaluators. This study examines the legitimacy of CSR actions of publicly traded forest products companies as compared (...)
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  • An Evaluation of Corporate Social Responsibility Communication on the Websites of Telecommunication Companies Operating in Ghana.Henry Boateng & Ibn Kailan Abdul-Hamid - 2017 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 15 (1):17-31.
    Purpose Corporate social responsibility communication on corporate websites have become an emerging trend by firms. Similarly, corporate websites have been used to manage stakeholders’ impressions about the organization. Meanwhile, CSR by firms have been criticized for been a manipulative tactics used by firms. The purpose of this paper therefore is to ascertain how telecommunication companies operating in Ghana communicate CSR on their corporate websites. Design/methodology/approach This study used a qualitative content analysis technique. It also used Bolino et al.’s impression management (...)
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  • How Does It Fit? Exploring the Congruence Between Organizations and Their Corporate Social Responsibility Activities.Menno D. T. de Jong & Mark van der Meer - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):71-83.
    Several studies have focused on the effects of corporate social responsibility fit on external stakeholders’ evaluations of CSR activities, attitudes towards companies or brands, and behaviors. The results so far have been contradictory. A possible reason may be that the concept of CSR fit is more complicated than previously assumed. Researchers suggest that there may be different types of CSR fit, but so far no empirical research has focused on a typology of CSR fit. This study fills this gap, describing (...)
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  • On the Role of Social Media in the ‘Responsible’ Food Business: Blogger Buzz on Health and Obesity Issues.Hsin-Hsuan Meg Lee, Willemijn Van Dolen & Ans Kolk - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):695-707.
    To contribute to the debate on the role of social media in responsible business, this article explores blogger buzz in reaction to food companies’ press releases on health and obesity issues, considering the content and the level of fit between the CSR initiatives and the company. Findings show that companies issued more product-related initiatives than promotion-related ones. Among these, less than half generated a substantial number of responses from bloggers, which could not be identified as a specific group. While new (...)
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  • Is Publicity Always Better Than Advertising? The Role of Brand Reputation in Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility.Siv Skard & Helge Thorbjørnsen - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (1):1-12.
    Previous studies on corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication suggest that firms’ social initiatives should be communicated through third-party, non-corporate sources because they are perceived as unbiased and therefore reduce consumer skepticism. In this article, we extend existing research by showing that source effects in the communication of social sponsorships are contingent on the brand’s pre-existing reputation. We argue that the congruence between the credibility and trustworthiness of the message source and the brand helps predict consumer responses to a social sponsorship. (...)
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  • Legitimation Work Within a Cross-Sector Social Partnership.Dominik Rueede & Karin Kreutzer - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (1):39-58.
    This study illuminates how a cross-sector social partnership legitimizes itself toward multiple internal and external stakeholders. Within a single-case study design, we collected retrospective and real time data on the partnership between Deutsche Post DHL and The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Within this partnership, Deutsche Post DHL provides corporate volunteers that support disaster response after natural disasters on a pro bono basis. The main objects that needed legitimacy as well as the audiences from which legitimacy (...)
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  • Seeking Legitimacy Through CSR: Institutional Pressures and Corporate Responses of Multinationals in Sri Lanka.Eshani Beddewela & Jenny Fairbrass - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):503-522.
    Arguably, the corporate social responsibility practices of multinational enterprises are influenced by a wide range of both internal and external factors. Perhaps, most critical among the exogenous forces operating on MNEs are those exerted by state and other key institutional actors in host countries. Crucially, academic research conducted to date offers little data about how MNEs use their CSR activities to strategically manage their relationship with those actors in order to gain legitimisation advantages in host countries. This paper addresses that (...)
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  • How Does Corporate Social Responsibility Engagement Influence Word of Mouth on Twitter? Evidence From the Airline Industry.Tam Thien Vo, Xinning Xiao & Shuk Ying Ho - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (2):525-542.
    Our study examines how a company’s engagement in corporate social responsibility influences word of mouth about the company on Twitter, particularly during a service delay. We use the airline industry as the study context. On the popular social medium Twitter, people post tweets about airline services and raise concerns about service delays when flights are delayed, canceled, or diverted. Drawing on the literature on legitimacy and the halo effect, we argue that a company’s CSR engagement enhances its corporate image, which (...)
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  • Do CSR Messages Resonate? Examining Public Reactions to Firms’ CSR Efforts on Social Media.Gregory D. Saxton, Lina Gomez, Zed Ngoh, Yi-Pin Lin & Sarah Dietrich - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):359-377.
    We posit a key goal of firms’ corporate social responsibility efforts is to influence reputation through carefully crafted communicative practices. This trend has accelerated with the rise of social media such as Twitter and Facebook, which are essentially public message networks that organizations are leveraging to engage with concerned audiences. Given the large number of messages sent on these sites, only some will be effective and achieve broad public resonance. Building on signaling theory, this paper asks whether and how messages (...)
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  • On the Discursive Construction of Corporate Social Responsibility in Advertising Agencies.Neva Štumberger & Urša Golob - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (3):521-536.
    As the interest in corporate social responsibility within advertising industry is growing, this paper explores the discourse on CSR among employees in advertising agencies. Different sensemaking dimensions are taken into account to examine how employees, as one of the key stakeholders involved in the joint meaning construction, make sense of CSR. In addition, this paper studies the legitimation approaches that employees use to address CSR of advertising agencies. The empirical evidence of discursive examples also indicates that there is a linkage (...)
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  • Corporate Social Performance and Economic Cycles.Jeffrey S. Harrison & Shawn L. Berman - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (2):279-294.
    Do firms respond to changes in economic growth by altering their corporate social responsibility programs? If they do respond, are their responses simply neglect of areas associated with corporate social performance or do they also cut back on positive programs such as profit sharing, public/private housing programs, or charitable contributions? In this paper, we argue that because CSP-related actions and programs tend to be discretionary, they are likely to receive less attention during tough economic times, a result of cost-cutting efforts. (...)
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  • How Does Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility Matter in a Dysfunctional Institutional Environment? Evidence From China.Zelong Wei, Hao Shen, Kevin Zheng Zhou & Julie Juan Li - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (2):209-223.
    Drawing on institutional and signaling theories, this study examines how environmental corporate social responsibility affects firm performance in a dysfunctional institutional environment. We extend the ECSR literature by suggesting that ECSR indirectly influences firm performance through the mediating effects of business and political legitimacy. Based on a dataset of 238 firms in China, we find that ECSR affects business and political legitimacy followed by firm performance. Moreover, legal incompleteness weakens and legal inefficiency strengthens the effects of ECSR on business and (...)
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  • The Frontstage and Backstage of Corporate Sustainability Reporting: Evidence From the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Bill.Charles H. Cho, Matias Laine, Robin W. Roberts & Michelle Rodrigue - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):865-886.
    While proponents of sustainability reporting believe in its potential to help corporations be accountable and transparent about their social and environmental impacts, there has been growing criticism asserting that such reporting schemes are utilized primarily as impression management tools. Drawing on Goffman’s self-presentation theory and its frontstage/backstage analogy, we contrast the frontstage sustainability discourse of a sample of large U.S. oil and gas firms to their backstage corporate political activities in the context of the passage of the American-Made Energy and (...)
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  • A Text Mining-Based Review of Cause-Related Marketing Literature.João Guerreiro, Paulo Rita & Duarte Trigueiros - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (1):111-128.
    Cause-related marketing has risen to become a popular strategy to increase business value through profit-motivated giving. Despite the growing number of articles published in the last decade, no comprehensive analysis of the most discussed constructs of cause-related marketing is available. This paper uses an advanced Text Mining methodology to conduct a comprehensive analysis of 246 articles published in 40 different journals between 1988 and 2013 on the subject of cause-related marketing. Text Mining also allows quantitative analyses to be performed on (...)
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  • Defensive Responses to Strategic Sustainability Paradoxes: Have Your Coke and Drink It Too!Kirsti Iivonen - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (2):309-327.
    This study examines how the leading beverage company handles the strategic paradox between its core business and the social issue of obesity. A discursive analysis reveals how the organization does embrace a social goal related to obesity but not the paradoxical tension between this goal and its core business. The analysis further shows how the tension, along with the responsibility for the social goal, is projected outside the organization. This response is underpinned by the paradoxical constructions of consumers and the (...)
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