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  1. Dreaming, Cognition, and Physical Illness: Part I.Robert Haskell - 1985 - Journal of Medical Humanities 6 (1):46-56.
    Part I of a two part article on the effect upon dreaming on physical illness briefly explores the historical medico-philosophical antecedents of the notion that dreams can be diagnostic of bodily disease. Modern sleep research findings relating REM sleep to physiologic changes are also explored. The controversy of whether dreams are merely the consequence of random brain activity or whether they are a valid psychological phenomenon is discussed. Six contemporary views of the function of REM sleep are outlined. A seventh (...)
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  • AS SOMBRAS CEGAS DE NARCISO (um estudo psicossocial sobre o imaginário coletivo).Roberto Thomas Arruda (ed.) - 2020 - Terra à Vista.
    No presente trabalho, vamos abordar algumas das questões essenciais sobre o imaginário coletivo e suas relações com a realidade e a verdade. Devemos encarar esse assunto em uma estrutura conceptual, seguida pela análise factual correspondente às realidades comportamentais demonstráveis. Adotaremos não apenas a metodologia, mas principalmente os princípios e proposições da filosofia analítica, que com certeza serão evidentes ao longo do estudo e podem ser identificados pelos recursos descritos por Perez[1] : Rabossi (1975) defende a ideia de que a filosofia (...)
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  • The Blind Shadows of Narcissus - a Psychosocial Study on Collective Imaginary.Roberto Thomas Arruda (ed.) - 2020 - Terra à vista.
    In this work, we will approach some of the essential questions about the collective imaginary and their relations with reality and truth. We should face this subject in a conceptual framework, followed by the corresponding factual analysis of demonstrable behavioral realities. We will adopt not only the methodology, but mostly the tenets and propositions of the analytic philosophy, which for sure will be apparent throughout the study, and may be identified by the features described by Perez : Rabossi (1975) defends (...)
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  • Hypnotic Experience: A Cognitive Social-Psychological Reality.Martin T. Orne, David F. Dinges & Emily Carota Orne - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):477-478.
  • Qualia Ain't in the Head Review of Ten Problems of Consciousness: A Representational Theory of the Phenomenal Mind by Michael Tye. [REVIEW]David M. Armstrong - 1995 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 2:31--4.
  • Consciousness and Sensation: Philosophical Aspects.David Rosenthal - 2001 - In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Pergamon/Elsevier.
    consciousness. Such unconscious processing always " Cambridge, UK " tends to re?ect habitual or strong responses. From this.
     
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  • A Limitation of the Reflex-Arc Approach to Consciousness.J. Steven Reznick & Philip David Zelazo - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):692-692.
  • An Approach to Cognitive Dissonance Theory in Terms of Ordinary Language.Richard Totman - 1973 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 3 (2):215–238.
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  • Concepts, Introspection, and Phenomenal Consciousness: An Information-Theoretical Approach.Murat Aydede & Guven Guzeldere - 2005 - Noûs 39 (2):197-255.
    This essay is a sustained attempt to bring new light to some of the perennial problems in philosophy of mind surrounding phenomenal consciousness and introspection through developing an account of sensory and phenomenal concepts. Building on the information-theoretic framework of Dretske (1981), we present an informational psychosemantics as it applies to what we call sensory concepts, concepts that apply, roughly, to so-called secondary qualities of objects. We show that these concepts have a special informational character and semantic structure that closely (...)
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  • Unconscious Representations 1: Belying the Traditional Model of Human Cognition.Luis M. Augusto - 2013 - Axiomathes 23 (4):1-19.
    The traditional model of human cognition (TMHC) postulates an ontological and/or structural gap between conscious and unconscious mental representations. By and large, it sees higher-level mental processes as commonly conceptual or symbolic in nature and therefore conscious, whereas unconscious, lower-level representations are conceived as non-conceptual or sub-symbolic. However, experimental evidence belies this model, suggesting that higher-level mental processes can be, and often are, carried out in a wholly unconscious way and/or without conceptual representations, and that these can be processed unconsciously. (...)
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  • Painstaking Reminders of Forgotten Trance Logic.David Spiegel - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):484-485.
  • The Construction of Subjective Experience: Memory Attributions.Colleen M. Kelley & Larry L. Jacoby - 1990 - Mind and Language 5 (1):49-68.
  • On the Inter-Relatedness of Theory and Measurement in the Study of Unconscious Processes.Eyal M. Reingold & Philip M. Merikle - 1990 - Mind and Language 5 (1):9-28.
  • Unconscious Semantic Processing: The Pendulum Keeps on Swinging.David A. Balota - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):23-24.
  • Dissociating Consciousness From Cognition.David Spiegel - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):695-696.
  • Time and Consciousness.David M. Rosenthal - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):220-221.
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  • Unconscious Perception Revisited: A Comment on Merikle (1992).S. H. A. Henley - 1984 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (2):121-4.
  • What's New Here?Bruce Mangan - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):160-161.
    O'Brien & Opie's (O&O's) theory demands a view of unconscious processing that is incompatible with virtually all current PDP models of neural activity. Relative to the alternatives, the theory is closer to an AI than a parallel distributed processing (PDP) perspective, and its treatment of phenomenology is ad hoc. It raises at least one important question: Could features of network relaxation be the “switch” that turns an unconscious into a conscious network?
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  • The Functional Role of Consciousness: A Phenomenological Approach.Uriah Kriegel - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):171-93.
    In this paper, a theoretical account of the functional role of consciousness in the cognitive system of normal subjects is developed. The account is based upon an approach to consciousness that is drawn from the phenomenological tradition. On this approach, consciousness is essentially peripheral self-awareness, in a sense to be duly explained. It will be argued that the functional role of consciousness, so construed, is to provide the subject with just enough information about her ongoing experience to make it possible (...)
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  • The Consciousness Continuum: From "Qualia" to "Free Will".George Mandler - 2005 - Psychological Research/Psychologische Forschung. Vol 69 (5-6):330-337.
  • Consciousness: Phenomenal Consciousness, Access Consciousness, and Scientific Practice.Uriah Kriegel - 2007 - In Paul R. Thagard (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophy of Psychology and Cognitive Science. Elsevier.
    Key Terms: Phenomenal consciousness, access consciousness, qualitative character, subjective character, intransitive self-consciousness, disposition, categorical basis, subliminal perception, blindsight.
     
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  • Introspective Physicalism as an Approach to the Science of Consciousness.Anthony I. Jack & T. Shallice - 2001 - Cognition 79 (1):161-196.
    Most ?theories of consciousness? are based on vague speculations about the properties of conscious experience. We aim to provide a more solid basis for a science of consciousness. We argue that a theory of consciousness should provide an account of the very processes that allow us to acquire and use information about our own mental states ? the processes underlying introspection. This can be achieved through the construction of information processing models that can account for ?Type-C? processes. Type-C processes can (...)
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  • What About the Unconscious?Chris Mortensen - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):162-162.
    O'Brien & Opie do not address the question of the psychotherapeutic role of unconscious representational states such as beliefs. A dilemma is proposed: if they accept the legitimacy of such states then they should modify what they say about dissociation, and if they do not, they owe us an account of why.
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  • The Construction of Subjective Experience: Memory Attributions.Clarence M. Kelley & Larry L. Jacoby - 1990 - Mind and Language 5 (1):49-68.
  • Semantic Activation Without Conscious Identification: Can Progress Be Made?Daniel Holender - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):768.
  • Functional Consequences of Perceiving Facial Expressions of Emotion Without Awareness.John D. Eastwood & Daniel Smilek - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):565-584.
    A substantial body of research has established that even when we are not consciously aware of the faces of others we are nevertheless sensitive to, and impacted by their facial expression. In this paper, we consider this body of research from a new perspective by examining the functions of unconscious perception revealed by these studies. A consideration of the literature from this perspective highlights that existing research methods are limited when it comes to revealing possible functions of unconscious perception. The (...)
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  • Dream Processing.David Foulkes - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):678-678.
  • Levels of Processing During Non-Conscious Perception: A Critical Review of Visual Masking.Sid Kouider & Stanislas Dehaene - 2007 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, B 362 (1481):857-875.
  • Developing Concepts of Consciousness.Aaron Sloman - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):694-695.
  • Consciousness From a First-Person Perspective.Max Velmans - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):702-726.
    This paper replies to the first 36 commentaries on my target article on “Is human information processing conscious?” (Behavioral and Brain Sciences,1991, pp.651-669). The target article focused largely on experimental studies of how consciousness relates to human information processing, tracing their relation from input through to output, while discussion of the implications of the findings both for cognitive psychology and philosophy of mind was relatively brief. The commentaries reversed this emphasis, and so, correspondingly, did the reply. The sequence of topics (...)
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  • The Standing of Psychoanalysis.Edward Erwin - 1984 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (2):115-128.
    tries to elucidate some of the rational considerations that determine the standing and value of psychoanalysis. He is sceptical about much of the positive evidence, but he also tries to provide some support for Freudian doctrines. I examine his supporting arguments and try to show that they have serious weaknesses.
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  • Processing of a Subliminal Rebus During Sleep: Idiosyncratic Primary Versus Secondary Process Associations Upon Awakening From REM- Versus Non-REM-Sleep.Jana Steinig, Ariane Bazan, Svenja Happe, Sarah Antonetti & Howard Shevrin - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Primary and secondary processes are the foundational axes of the Freudian mental apparatus: one horizontally as a tendency to associate, the primary process, and one vertically as the ability for perspective taking, the secondary process. Primary process mentation is not only supposed to be dominant in the unconscious but also, for example, in dreams. The present study tests the hypothesis that the mental activity during REM-sleep has more characteristics of the primary process, while during non-REM-sleep more secondary process operations take (...)
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  • Time and the Observer: The Where and When of Consciousness in the Brain.Daniel C. Dennett & Marcel Kinsbourne - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):183-201.
    _Behavioral and Brain Sciences_ , 15, 183-247, 1992. Reprinted in _The Philosopher's Annual_ , Grim, Mar and Williams, eds., vol. XV-1992, 1994, pp. 23-68; Noel Sheehy and Tony Chapman, eds., _Cognitive Science_ , Vol. I, Elgar, 1995, pp.210-274.
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  • Is Human Information Processing Conscious?Max Velmans - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):651-69.
    Investigations of the function of consciousness in human information processing have focused mainly on two questions: (1) where does consciousness enter into the information processing sequence and (2) how does conscious processing differ from preconscious and unconscious processing. Input analysis is thought to be initially "preconscious," "pre-attentive," fast, involuntary, and automatic. This is followed by "conscious," "focal-attentive" analysis which is relatively slow, voluntary, and flexible. It is thought that simple, familiar stimuli can be identified preconsciously, but conscious processing is needed (...)
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  • Epi-Arguments for Epiphenomenalism.Bruce Mangan - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):689-690.
  • Orienting of Attention Without Awareness is Affected by Measurement-Induced Attentional Control Settings.Jason Ivanoff & Raymond M. Klein - 2003 - Journal of Vision. Special Issue 3 (1):32-40.
  • Explaining What?Elizabeth Irvine - 2014 - Topoi 36 (1):95-106.
    The Hard Problem is surrounded by a vast literature, to which it is increasingly hard to contribute to in any meaningful way. Accordingly, the strategy here is not to offer any new metaphysical or ‘in principle’ arguments in favour of the success of materialism, but to assume a Type Q approach and look to contemporary consciousness science to see how the concept of consciousness fares there, and what kind of explanations we can hope to offer of it. It is suggested (...)
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  • Unconscious Perception Re-Revisited: A Comment on Merikle’s Paper.S. H. A. Henley - 1984 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (2):121-124.
  • Unconscious Perception of Meaning: A Failure to Replicate.Karen A. Nolan & Alfonso Caramazza - 1982 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (1):23-26.
  • Psychophysiological Indices of Implicit Memory Performance.Shlomo Bentin & Morris Moscovitch - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (4):346-352.
  • Consciousness, Causality and Complementarity.Max Velmans - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):404-416.
    This reply to five continuing commentaries on my 1991 target article on “Is human information processing conscious” focuses on six related issues: 1) whether focal attentive processing replaces consciousness as a causal agent in third-person viewable human information processing, 2)whether consciousness can be dissociated from human information processing, 3) continuing disputes about definitions of "consciousness" and about what constitutes a “conscious process” , 4) how observer-relativity in psychology relates (and does not relate) to relativity in physics, 5) whether the first-person (...)
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  • What is Blindsight?John Campion & Richard Latto - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):755-757.
  • On Inferring Blindsight From Normal Vision.L. Lutzemberger, C. A. Marzi & G. Tassinari - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):754-755.
  • Conceptual, Experimental, and Theoretical Indeterminacies in Research on Semantic Activation Without Conscious Identification.Daniel Holender - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):50-66.
  • A Review of the Literature with and Without Awareness. [REVIEW]George Wolford - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):49-50.
  • Facilitation or Inhibition From Parafoveal Words?Geoffrey Underwood - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):48-49.
  • Priming Without Awareness: What Was All the Fuss About?Keith E. Stanovich & Dean G. Purcell - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):47-48.