Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching.Michael R. Matthews (ed.) - 2014 - Springer.
    This inaugural handbook documents the distinctive research field that utilizes history and philosophy in investigation of theoretical, curricular and pedagogical issues in the teaching of science and mathematics. It is contributed to by 130 researchers from 30 countries; it provides a logically structured, fully referenced guide to the ways in which science and mathematics education is, informed by the history and philosophy of these disciplines, as well as by the philosophy of education more generally. The first handbook to cover the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • The Early History of Chance in Evolution.Charles H. Pence - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 50:48-58.
    Work throughout the history and philosophy of biology frequently employs ‘chance’, ‘unpredictability’, ‘probability’, and many similar terms. One common way of understanding how these concepts were introduced in evolution focuses on two central issues: the first use of statistical methods in evolution (Galton), and the first use of the concept of “objective chance” in evolution (Wright). I argue that while this approach has merit, it fails to fully capture interesting philosophical reflections on the role of chance expounded by two of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Special Issue: Philosophical Considerations in the Teaching of Biology. Part II, Evolution, Development and Genetics.Kostas Kampourakis (ed.) - 2013 - Springer (Science & Education).
  • Natural Selection According to Darwin: Cause or Effect?Ben Bradley - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (2):1-26.
    In the 1940s, the ‘modern synthesis’ of Darwinism and genetics cast genetic mutation and recombination as the source of variability from which environmental events naturally select the fittest, such ‘natural selection’ constituting the cause of evolution. Recent biology increasingly challenges this view by casting genes as followers and awarding the leading role in the genesis of adaptations to the agency and plasticity of developing phenotypes—making natural selection a consequence of other causal processes. Both views of natural selection claim to capture (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Complicating the Story of Popular Science: John Maynard Smith’s “Little Penguin” on The Theory of Evolution.Helen Piel - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (3):371-390.
    Popular science writing has received increasing interest, especially in its relation to professional science. I extend the current scholarly focus from the nineteenth to the twentieth century by providing a microhistory of the early popular writings of evolutionary biologist John Maynard Smith. Linking them to the state of evolutionary biology as a professional science as well as Maynard Smith’s own professional standing, I examine the interplay between author, text and audiences. In particular, I focus on Maynard Smith’s book The Theory (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Replies to the Critics: Roger M. White, M. J. S. Hodge, and Gregory Radick: Darwin’s Argument by Analogy: From Artificial to Natural Selection. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021, Viii + 251 Pp, $99.99 HB. [REVIEW]Gregory Radick, Jonathan Hodge & Roger M. White - 2022 - Metascience 31 (2):163-169.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Replies to the Critics.Roger M. White, Jonathan Hodge & Gregory Radick - 2022 - Metascience 31 (2):163-169.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophy of Immunology.Bartlomiej Swiatczak & Alfred I. Tauber - 2020 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 2020.
    Philosophy of immunology is a subfield of philosophy of biology dealing with ontological and epistemological issues related to the studies of the immune system. While speculative investigations and abstract analyses have always been part of immune theorizing, until recently philosophers have largely ignored immunology. Yet the implications for understanding the philosophical basis of organismal functions framed by immunity offer new perspectives on fundamental questions of biology and medicine. Developed in the context of history of medicine, theoretical biology, and medical anthropology, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Darwinism.James Lennox - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Darwinism designates a distinctive form of evolutionary explanation for the history and diversity of life on earth. Its original formulation is provided in the first edition of On the Origin of Species in 1859. This entry first formulates ‘Darwin's Darwinism’ in terms of five philosophically distinctive themes: (i) probability and chance, (ii) the nature, power and scope of selection, (iii) adaptation and teleology, (iv) nominalism vs. essentialism about species and (v) the tempo and mode of evolutionary change. Both Darwin and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence 2017.Vincent C. Müller (ed.) - 2017 - Berlin: Springer.
    This book reports on the results of the third edition of the premier conference in the field of philosophy of artificial intelligence, PT-AI 2017, held on November 4 - 5, 2017 at the University of Leeds, UK. It covers: advanced knowledge on key AI concepts, including complexity, computation, creativity, embodiment, representation and superintelligence; cutting-edge ethical issues, such as the AI impact on human dignity and society, responsibilities and rights of machines, as well as AI threats to humanity and AI safety; (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Is Evolutionary Biology Infected With Invalid Teleological Reasoning?David J. Depew - 2010 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 2 (20130604).
    John Reiss is a practicing evolutionary biologist (herpetology) who by his own account happened to be in the right place (Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology) at the right time (the 1980s) to hear echoes of the debate about sociobiology that had been raging there between E. O. Wilson and, on the other side, Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Lewontin (xiv). Reiss is not concerned with sociobiology, at least in this book, but with the adaptationism that Gould and Lewontin saw in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Fate of Darwinism: Evolution After the Modern Synthesis.David J. Depew & Bruce H. Weber - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (1):89-102.
    We trace the history of the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis, and of genetic Darwinism generally, with a view to showing why, even in its current versions, it can no longer serve as a general framework for evolutionary theory. The main reason is empirical. Genetical Darwinism cannot accommodate the role of development in many evolutionary processes. We go on to discuss two conceptual issues: whether natural selection can be the “creative factor” in a new, more general framework for evolutionary theorizing; and whether (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Visions of Evolution: Self-Organization Proposes What Natural Selection Disposes.David Batten, Stanley Salthe & Fabio Boschetti - 2008 - Biological Theory 3 (1):17-29.
    This article reviews the seven “visions” of evolution proposed by Depew and Weber , concluding that each posited relationship between natural selection and self-organization has suited different aims and approaches. In the second section of the article, we show that these seven viewpoints may be collapsed into three fundamentally different ones: natural selection drives evolution; self-organization drives evolution; and natural selection and self-organization are complementary aspects of the evolutionary process. We then argue that these three approaches are not mutually exclusive, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • The Origins of Species Concepts.John Simpson Wilkins - 2003 - Dissertation, University of Melbourne
    The longstanding species problem in biology has a history that suggests a solution, and that history is not the received history found in many texts written by biologists or philosophers. The notion of species as the division into subordinate groups of any generic predicate was the staple of logic from Aristotle through the middle ages until quite recently. However, the biological species concept during the same period was at first subtly and then overtly different. Unlike the logic sense, which relied (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Genetic Biotechnology and Evolutionary Theory: Some Unsolicited Advice to Rhetors.David Depew - 2001 - Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (1):15-28.
    In his book The Biotech Century Jeremy Rifkin makes arguments about the dangers of market-driven genetic biotechnology in medical and agricultural contexts. Believing that Darwinism is too compromised by a competitive ethic to resist capitalist depredations of the genetic commons, and perhaps hoping to pick up anti-Darwinian allies, he turns for support to unorthodox non-Darwinian views of evolution. The Darwinian tradition, more closely examined, contains resources that might better serve his argument. The robust tradition associated with Theodosius Dobzhansky, Ernst Mayr, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Process Dynamics of Normative Function.Wayne David Christensen & Mark H. Bickhard - 2002 - The Monist 85 (1):3-28.
    Outlines the etiological theory of normative functionality. Analysis of the autonomous system; Function of systems-oriented approaches; Specifications of system identity.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   88 citations  
  • Revisiting Generality in Biology: Systems Biology and the Quest for Design Principles.Sara Green - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (5):629-652.
    Due to the variation, contingency and complexity of living systems, biology is often taken to be a science without fundamental theories, laws or general principles. I revisit this question in light of the quest for design principles in systems biology and show that different views can be reconciled if we distinguish between different types of generality. The philosophical literature has primarily focused on generality of specific models or explanations, or on the heuristic role of abstraction. This paper takes a different (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Three Kinds of Constructionism: The Role of Metaphor in the Debate Over Niche Constructionism.Emanuele Archetti - 2015 - Biological Theory 10 (2):103-115.
    Throughout the years a lively debate has flourished around niche construction theory. A source of contention has been the distinction between narrow and broad construction activities proposed by critics. Narrow construction is limited to the production of evolutionarily advantageous artifacts while broad construction refers to construction activities that have an impact on the ecosystem but offer little or negative adaptive feedback to the organisms. The first has been acknowledged as relevant to evolutionary studies in that it increases species’ fitness and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Mirror of Physics: On How the Price Equation Can Unify Evolutionary Biology.Victor J. Luque & Lorenzo Baravalle - 2021 - Synthese 199 (5-6):12439-12462.
    Due to its high degree of complexity and its historical nature, evolutionary biology has been traditionally portrayed as a messy science. According to the supporters of such a view, evolutionary biology would be unable to formulate laws and robust theories, instead just delivering coherent narratives and local models. In this article, our aim is to challenge this view by showing how the Price equation can work as the core of a general theoretical framework for evolutionary phenomena. To support this claim, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Physical Determinants in the Emergence and Inheritance of Multicellular Form.Stuart A. Newman & Marta Linde-Medina - 2013 - Biological Theory 8 (3):274-285.
    We argue that the physics of complex materials and self-organizing processes should be made central to the biology of form. Rather than being encoded in genes, form emerges when cells and certain of their molecules mobilize physical forces, effects, and processes in a multicellular context. What is inherited from one generation to the next are not genetic programs for constructing organisms, but generative mechanisms of morphogenesis and pattern formation and the initial and boundary conditions for reproducing the specific traits of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Beyond Generalized Darwinism. II. More Things in Heaven and Earth.Werner Callebaut - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (4):351-365.
    This is the second of two articles in which I reflect on “generalized Darwinism” as currently discussed in evolutionary economics. In the companion article I approached evolutionary economics from the naturalistic perspectives of evolutionary epistemology and the philosophy of biology, contrasted evolutionary economists’ cautious generalizations of Darwinism with “imperialistic” proposals to unify the behavioral sciences, and discussed the continued resistance to biological ideas in the social sciences. Here I assess Generalized Darwinism as propounded by Geoffrey Hodgson, Thorbjørn Knudsen, and others, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Beyond Generalized Darwinism. I. Evolutionary Economics From the Perspective of Naturalistic Philosophy of Biology.Werner Callebaut - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (4):338-350.
    This is the first of two articles in which I reflect on “generalized Darwinism” as currently discussed in evolutionary economics. I approach evolutionary economics by the roundabouts of evolutionary epistemology and the philosophy of biology, and contrast evolutionary economists’ cautious generalizations of Darwinism with “imperialistic” proposals to unify the behavioral sciences. I then discuss the continued resistance to biological ideas in the social sciences, focusing on the issues of naturalism and teleology. In the companion article I assess generalized Darwinism, concentrating (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Theory is as Theory Does: Scientific Practice and Theory Structure in Biology.Alan C. Love - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (4):325-337, 430.
    Using the context of controversies surrounding evolutionary developmental biology (EvoDevo) and the possibility of an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis, I provide an account of theory structure as idealized theory presentations that are always incomplete (partial) and shaped by their conceptual content (material rather than formal organization). These two characteristics are salient because the goals that organize and regulate scientific practice, including the activity of using a theory, are heterogeneous. This means that the same theory can be structured differently, in part because (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • The Unbounded Vistas of Science: Evolutionary Limitations.E. Atlee Jackson - 2000 - Complexity 5 (5):35-44.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Beyond the Material and the Mechanical: Occam's Razor is a Double-Edged Blade.Robert E. Ulanowicz - 1995 - Zygon 30 (2):249-266.
  • What’s Wrong with the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis? A Critical Reply to Welch.Koen B. Tanghe, Alexis De Tiège, Lieven Pauwels, Stefaan Blancke & Johan Braeckman - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (3-4):23.
    Welch :263–279, 2017) has recently proposed two possible explanations for why the field of evolutionary biology is plagued by a steady stream of claims that it needs urgent reform. It is either seriously deficient and incapable of incorporating ideas that are new, relevant and plausible or it is not seriously deficient at all but is prone to attracting discontent and to the championing of ideas that are not very relevant, plausible and/or not really new. He argues for the second explanation. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Selection is Entailed by Self-Organization and Natural Selection is a Special Case.Rod Swenson - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (2):167-181.
    In their book, Darwinism Evolving: Systems Dynamics and the Genealogy of Natural Selection, Depew and Weber argued for the need to address the relationship between self-organization and natural selection in evolutionary theory, and focused on seven “visions” for doing so. Recently, Batten et al. in a paper in this journal, entitled “Visions of evolution: self-organization proposes what natural selection disposes,” picked up the issue with the work of Depew and Weber as a starting point. While the efforts of both sets (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Two “EvoDevos”.Marta Linde Medina - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (1):7-11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • In Search of Lost Time, Merleau-Ponty, Bergson, and the Time of Objects.Dorothea Olkowski - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):525-544.
    The chapter on temporality in Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception , is situated in a section titled, “Being-for-Itself and Being-in-the-World.” As such, Merleau-Ponty’s task in the chapter on temporality is to bring these two positions together, in other words, to articulate the manner in which time links the cogito (Being-for-Itself) with freedom (Being-in-the-World). To accomplish this, Merleau-Ponty proposes a subject located at the junction of the for-itself and the in-itself, a subject which has an exterior that makes it possible for others (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Design and its Discontents.Bruce H. Weber - 2011 - Synthese 178 (2):271 - 289.
    The design argument was rebutted by David Hume. He argued that the world and its contents (such as organisms) were not analogous to human artifacts. Hume further suggested that there were equally plausible alternatives to design to explain the organized complexity of the cosmos, such as random processes in multiple universes, or that matter could have inherent properties to self-organize, absent any external crafting. William Paley, writing after Hume, argued that the functional complexity of living beings, however, defied naturalistic explanations. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • On the Emergence of Living Systems.Bruce H. Weber - 2009 - Biosemiotics 2 (3):343-359.
    If the problem of the origin of life is conceptualized as a process of emergence of biochemistry from proto-biochemistry, which in turn emerged from the organic chemistry and geochemistry of primitive earth, then the resources of the new sciences of complex systems dynamics can provide a more robust conceptual framework within which to explore the possible pathways of chemical complexification leading to living systems and biosemiosis. In such a view the emergence of life, and concomitantly of natural selection and biosemiosis, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Embracing the Biosemiotic Perspective.Bruce H. Weber - 2009 - Biosemiotics 2 (3):367-375.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Emancipation Through Interaction – How Eugenics and Statistics Converged and Diverged.Francisco Louçã - 2009 - Journal of the History of Biology 42 (4):649 - 684.
    The paper discusses the scope and influence of eugenics in defining the scientific programme of statistics and the impact of the evolution of biology on social scientists. It argues that eugenics was instrumental in providing a bridge between sciences, and therefore created both the impulse and the institutions necessary for the birth of modern statistics in its applications first to biology and then to the social sciences. Looking at the question from the point of view of the history of statistics (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Cultural Evolution, Reductionism in the Social Sciences, and Explanatory Pluralism.Jean Lachapelle - 2000 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (3):331-361.
    This article argues that it is possible to bring the social sciences into evolutionary focus without being committed to a thesis the author calls ontological reductionism, which is a widespread predilection for lower-level explanations. After showing why we should reject ontological reductionism, the author argues that there is a way to construe cultural evolution that does justice to the autonomy of social science explanations. This paves the way for a liberal approach to explanation the author calls explanatory pluralism, which allows (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Again, What the Philosophy of Biology is Not.Werner Callebaut - 2005 - Acta Biotheoretica 53 (2):93-122.
    There are many things that philosophy of biology might be. But, given the existence of a professional philosophy of biology that is arguably a progressive research program and, as such, unrivaled, it makes sense to define philosophy of biology more narrowly than the totality of intersecting concerns biologists and philosophers (let alone other scholars) might have. The reasons for the success of the “new” philosophy of biology remain poorly understood. I reflect on what Dutch and Flemish, and, more generally, European (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Feminist Philosophy of Science1.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 2002 - In Peter Machamer Michael Silberstein (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Blackwell. pp. 312.
  • Fact, Phenomenon, and Theory in the Darwinian Research Tradition.Bruce H. Weber - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (2):168-178.
    From its inception Darwinian evolutionary biology has been seen as having a problematic relationship of fact and theory. While the forging of the modern evolutionary synthesis resolved most of these issues for biologists, critics continue to argue that natural selection and common descent are “only theories.” Much of the confusion engendered by the “evolution wars” can be clarified by applying the concept of phenomena, inferred from fact, and explained by theories, thus locating where legitimate dissent may still exist. By setting (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Molecular and Developmental Biology.Paul Edmund Griffiths - 2002 - In Peter Machamer & Michael Silberstein (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers. pp. 252-271.
    Philosophical discussion of molecular and developmental biology began in the late 1960s with the use of genetics as a test case for models of theory reduction. With this exception, the theory of natural selection remained the main focus of philosophy of biology until the late 1970s. It was controversies in evolutionary theory over punctuated equilibrium and adaptationism that first led philosophers to examine the concept of developmental constraint. Developmental biology also gained in prominence in the 1980s as part of a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Historical Turn in the Study of Adaptation.Paul E. Griffiths - 1996 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (4):511-532.
    A number of philosophers and ‘evolutionary psychologists’ have argued that attacks on adaptationism in contemporary biology are misguided. These thinkers identify anti-adaptationism with advocacy of non-adaptive modes of explanation. They overlook the influence of anti-adaptationism in the development of more rigorous forms of adaptive explanation. Many biologists who reject adaptationism do not reject Darwinism. Instead, they have pioneered the contemporary historical turn in the study of adaptation. One real issue which remains unresolved amongst these methodological advances is the nature of (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   70 citations  
  • Fear of Scandalous Knowledge: Arguing About Coherence in Scientific Theory and Practice.Emily A. Schultz - unknown
    A decade after the ‘‘Sokal Hoax,’’ Alan Sokal and Paul Boghossian still claim that postmodern arguments are incoherent attacks on reason and truth. However, both also continue to mischaracterize ‘‘constructivist’’ epistemology, to engage in highly problematic logical gymnastics to defend their own views, and to ignore changes in philosophy of science and science studies since 1996. I offer a brief description of my own, rather different understanding of postmodern science criticism in order to contextualize my dissatisfaction with Sokal and Boghossian’s (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Reply to Commentaries.Evan Thompson - 2011 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (5-6):5-6.
    Let me express my deep thanks to the contributors for taking the time to read my book, Mind in Life, and for writing their thoughtful commentaries, from which I have learned a great deal. Special thanks are due to Tobias Schlicht, whose hard work and dedication made this volume possible. In what follows, I will respond singly to each con-tributor and do my best to address their main points. My replies to the commentators will be longer or shorter depending on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Revisiting Generality in the Life Sciences: Systems Biology and the Quest for General Principles.Sara Green - unknown
    Due to the variation, contingency and complexity of living systems, biology is often taken to be a science without fundamental theories, laws or general principles. I revisit this question in light of the quest for design principles in systems biology and show that different views can be reconciled if we distinguish between different types of generality. The philosophical literature has primarily focused on generality of specific models or explanations, or on the heuristic role of abstraction. This paper takes a different (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Environmental Ethics.Roberta L. Millstein - 2013 - In K. Kampourakis (ed.), The Philosophy of Biology: A Companion for Educators. Springer.
    A number of areas of biology raise questions about what is of value in the natural environment and how we ought to behave towards it: conservation biology, environmental science, and ecology, to name a few. Based on my experience teaching students from these and similar majors, I argue that the field of environmental ethics has much to teach these students. They come to me with pent-up questions and a feeling that more is needed to fully engage in their subjects, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Human Ecology, Process Philosophy and the Global Ecological Crisis.Arran Gare - 2000 - Concrescence 1:1-11.
    This paper argues that human ecology, based on process philosophy and challenging scientific materialism, is required to effectively confront the global ecological crisis now facing us.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Reciprocal Linkage Between Self-Organizing Processes is Sufficient for Self-Reproduction and Evolvability.Terrence W. Deacon - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (2):136-149.
    A simple molecular system is described consisting of the reciprocal linkage between an autocatalytic cycle and a self-assembling encapsulation process where the molecular constituents for the capsule are products of the autocatalysis. In a molecular environment sufficiently rich in the substrates, capsule growth will also occur with high predictability. Growth to closure will be most probable in the vicinity of the most prolific autocatalysis and will thus tend to spontaneously enclose supportive catalysts within the capsule interior. If subsequently disrupted in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • The Past Illuminates the Present.Bruce H. Weber - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):287-298.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • How political philosophies can help to discuss and differentiate theories in community ecology.Annette Voigt - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (2):1-25.
    This paper uses structural analogies to competing political philosophies of human society as a heuristic tool to differentiate between ecological theories and to bring out new aspects of apparently well-known classics of ecological scholarship. These two different areas of knowledge have in common that their objects are ‘societies’, i.e. units composed of individuals, and that contradictory and competing theories about these supra-individual units exist. The benefit of discussing ecological theories in terms of their analogies to political philosophies, in this case (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Biological and Physicochemical Explanations in Experimental Biology.William A. Rottschaefer - 2008 - Biological Theory 3 (4):380-390.
  • Ping Ao—Darwinian Dynamics Implies Developmental Ascendency : A Matter of Competing Metaphysics.James A. Coffman & Robert E. Ulanowicz - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (2):179-180.
  • Werner Callebaut and John Collier—Editorial: Biological Information (Biological Theory 1: 221–223, 2006).Root Gorelick - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (2):180-182.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark