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  1. Reflections on Darwin Historiography.Janet Browne - 2022 - Journal of the History of Biology 55 (2):381-393.
    Much has happened in the Darwin field since the _Correspondence_ began publishing in 1985. This overview of historiography suggests that the richness of the letters generates fresh scholarly questions and that Darwin, paradoxically, is becoming progressively deconstructed as a key figure in the history of science.
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  • Why the Rediscoverer Ended Up on the Sidelines: Hugo De Vries’s Theory of Inheritance and the Mendelian Laws.Ida H. Stamhuis - 2015 - Science & Education 24 (1-2):29-49.
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  • The ‘Domestication’ of Heredity: The Familial Organization of Geneticists at Cambridge University, 1895–1910.Marsha L. Richmond - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (3):565-605.
    In the early years of Mendelism, 1900-1910, William Bateson established a productive research group consisting of women and men studying biology at Cambridge. The empirical evidence they provided through investigating the patterns of hereditary in many different species helped confirm the validity of the Mendelian laws of heredity. What has not previously been well recognized is that owing to the lack of sufficient institutional support, the group primarily relied on domestic resources to carry out their work. Members of the group (...)
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  • Ein Botaniker in der Papiergeschichte: Offene Und Geschlossene Kooperationen in den Wissenschaften Um 1900A Botanist in the History of Paper: Open and Closed Cooperations in the Sciences Around 1900.Josephine Musil-Gutsch & Kärin Nickelsen - 2020 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 28 (1):1-33.
    ZusammenfassungDie Studie analysiert die Dynamik wissenschaftlicher Kooperation zwischen Natur- und Geisteswissenschaften an einem Beispiel aus der historischen Papierforschung in Wien um 1900. Im Mittelpunkt steht der Wiener Pflanzenphysiologe Julius Wiesner, der ab 1884 mittelalterliche Papiermanuskripte unter dem Mikroskop prüfte. Dies erfolgte in produktiver Zusammenarbeit mit Paläographen, Archäologen und Orientalisten. Der Aufsatz untersucht, warum dies gelang und wie die Zusammenarbeit sich entwickelte. Wir unterscheiden dabei zwei Formen der Kooperation: Während Wiesner anfangs nur reaktiv zuarbeitete, in einer „geschlossenen Kooperation“, trat er später (...)
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  • The Phytotronist and the Phenotype: Plant Physiology, Big Science, and a Cold War Biology of the Whole Plant.David P. D. Munns - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 50:29-40.
  • “The Awe in Which Biologists Hold Physicists”: Frits Went’s First Phytotron at Caltech, and an Experimental Definition of the Biological Environment.David P. D. Munns - 2014 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 36 (2):209-231.
    After Darwin, experimental biology sought to unravel organisms. By the early twentieth century, organisms were broadly conceived as the product of their heredity and their environment. Much historical work has explored the scientific attack on the genotype, particularly through the new science of genetics. This article explores the tandem efforts to assert experimental control over the environment in which plants grew and developed. The case described here concerns the creation of the first phytotron at Caltech by botanist and plant physiologist (...)
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  • New perspectives in the history of twentieth-century life sciences: historical, historiographical and epistemological themes.Robert Meunier & Kärin Nickelsen - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (1):19.
    The history of twentieth-century life sciences is not exactly a new topic. However, in view of the increasingly rapid development of the life sciences themselves over the past decades, some of the well-established narratives are worth revisiting. Taking stock of where we stand on these issues was the aim of a conference in 2015, entitled “Perspectives for the History of Life Sciences”. The papers in this topical collection are based on work presented and discussed at and around this meeting. Just (...)
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  • Spontaneous Generation and Disease Causation: Anton de Bary’s Experiments with Phytophthora Infestans and Late Blight of Potato. [REVIEW]Christina Matta - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (3):459 - 491.
    Anton de Bary is best known for his elucidation of the life cycle of Phytopthora infestans, the causal organism of late blight of potato and the crop losses that caused famine in nineteenth-century Europe. But while practitioner histories often claim this accomplishment as a founding moment of modern plant pathology, closer examination of de Bary's experiments and his published work suggest that his primary motiviation for pursing this research was based in developmental biology, not agriculture. De Bary shied away from (...)
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  • Spontaneous Generation and Disease Causation: Anton de Bary’s Experiments with Phytophthora Infestans and Late Blight of Potato.Christina Matta - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (3):459-491.
    Anton de Bary is best known for his elucidation of the life cycle of Phytopthora infestans, the causal organism of late blight of potato and the crop losses that caused famine in nineteenth-century Europe. But while practitioner histories often claim this accomplishment as a founding moment of modern plant pathology, closer examination of de Bary’s experiments and his published work suggest that his primary motiviation for pursing this research was based in developmental biology, not agriculture. De Bary shied away from (...)
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  • Who's Afraid of Epigenetics? Habits, Instincts, and Charles Darwin’s Evolutionary Theory.Mauro Mandrioli & Mariagrazia Portera - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (1):1-23.
    Our paper aims at bringing to the fore the crucial role that habits play in Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution by means of natural selection. We have organized the paper in two steps: first, we analyse value and functions of the concept of habit in Darwin's early works, notably in his Notebooks, and compare these views to his mature understanding of the concept in the Origin of Species and later works; second, we discuss Darwin’s ideas on habits in the light (...)
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  • Demarcating Nature, Defining Ecology: Creating a Rationale for the Study of Nature’s “Primitive Conditions”.S. Andrew Inkpen - 2017 - Perspectives on Science 25 (3):355-392.
    The relationship of man himself to his environment is an inseparable part of ecology; for he also is an organism and other organisms are a part of his environment. Ecology, therefore, broadly conceived and rightly understood, instead of being an academic science merely, out of touch with humanistic interests, is really that part of every other biological science which brings it into immediate relation to human kind. The proper place of humans in ecological study has been a recurring issue for (...)
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  • Wallace Redux?Jim Endersby - 2006 - Minerva 44 (2):209-218.
  • Gemmules and Elements: On Darwin’s and Mendel’s Concepts and Methods in Heredity. [REVIEW]Ute Deichmann - 2010 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (1):85-112.
    Inheritance and variation were a major focus of Charles Darwin’s studies. Small inherited variations were at the core of his theory of organic evolution by means of natural selection. He put forward a developmental theory of heredity (pangenesis) based on the assumption of the existence of material hereditary particles. However, unlike his proposition of natural selection as a new mechanism for evolutionary change, Darwin’s highly speculative and contradictory hypotheses on heredity were unfruitful for further research. They attempted to explain many (...)
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  • Gemmules and Elements: On Darwin’s and Mendel’s Concepts and Methods in Heredity.Ute Deichmann - 2010 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (1):85-112.
    Inheritance and variation were a major focus of Charles Darwin’s studies. Small inherited variations were at the core of his theory of organic evolution by means of natural selection. He put forward a developmental theory of heredity based on the assumption of the existence of material hereditary particles. However, unlike his proposition of natural selection as a new mechanism for evolutionary change, Darwin’s highly speculative and contradictory hypotheses on heredity were unfruitful for further research. They attempted to explain many complex (...)
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  • ""Charles Darwin Solves the" Riddle of the Flower"; or, Why Don't Historians of Biology Know About the Birds and the Bees?Richard Bellon - 2009 - History of Science 47 (4):373.
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