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  1. Consumer Reactions to CSR: A Brazilian Perspective.Sergio W. Carvalho, Sankar Sen, Marcio de Oliveira Mota & Renata Carneiro de Lima - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S1):291 - 310.
    In this research, we evaluate the response of Brazilian consumers to corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives accompanied by a price increase. We demonstrate that the extent to which Brazilian consumers perceive a company to be socially responsible (i.e., their CSR perceptions) is related to both the basic transactional outcome of purchase intentions as well as two relational outcomes: the likelihood to switch to a competitor and to complain about the CSR-based price increase. More interestingly, we find that these relationships are (...)
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  • Can an Industry Be Socially Responsible If Its Products Harm Consumers? The Case of Online Gambling.Mirella Yani-de-Soriano, Uzma Javed & Shumaila Yousafzai - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):481-497.
    Online gambling companies claim that they are ethical providers. They seem committed to corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices that are aimed at preventing or minimising the harm associated with their activities. Our empirical research employed a sample of 209 university student online gamblers, who took part in an online survey. Our findings suggest that the extent of online problem gambling is substantial and that it adversely impacts on the gambler's mental and physical health, social relationships and academic performance. Online problem (...)
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  • Measuring Corporate Social Responsibility: A Scale Development Study.Duygu Turker - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):411-427.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is one of the most prominent concepts in the literature and, in short, indicates the positive impacts of businesses on their stakeholders. Despite the growing body of literature on this concept, the measurement of CSR is still problematic. Although the literature provides several methods for measuring corporate social activities, almost all of them have some limitations. The purpose of this study is to provide an original, valid, and reliable measure of CSR reflecting the responsibilities of a (...)
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  • Corporations, Stakeholders and Sustainable Development I: A Theoretical Exploration of Business–Society Relations.Reinhard Steurer, Markus E. Langer, Astrid Konrad & André Martinuzzi - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (3):263-281.
    Sustainable development (SD) – that is, “Development that meets the needs of current generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs and aspirations” – can be pursued in many different ways. Stakeholder relations management (SRM) is one such way, through which corporations are confronted with economic, social, and environmental stakeholder claims. This paper lays the groundwork for an empirical analysis of the question of how far SD can be achieved through SRM. It describes the so-called SD–SRM (...)
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  • Investing in Socially Responsible Companies is a Must for Public Pension Funds – Because There is No Better Alternative.S. Prakash Sethi - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):99 - 129.
    >With assets of over US$1.0 trillion and growing, public pension funds in the United States have become a major force in the private sector through their holding of equity positions in large publicly traded corporations. More recently, these funds have been expanding their investment strategy by considering a corporations long-term risks on issues such as environmental protection, sustainability, and good corporate citizenship, and how these factors impact a companys long-term performance. Conventional wisdom argues that the fiduciary responsibility of the pension (...)
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  • Investing in Socially Responsible Companies is a Must for Public Pension Funds? Because There is No Better Alternative.S. Prakash Sethi - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):99-129.
    With assets of over US$1.0 trillion and growing, public pension funds in the United States have become a major force in the private sector through their holding of equity positions in large publicly traded corporations. More recently, these funds have been expanding their investment strategy by considering a corporation's long-term risks on issues such as environmental protection, sustainability, and good corporate citizenship, and how these factors impact a company's long-term performance. Conventional wisdom argues that the fiduciary responsibility of the pension (...)
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  • Do CSR Messages Resonate? Examining Public Reactions to Firms’ CSR Efforts on Social Media.Gregory D. Saxton, Lina Gomez, Zed Ngoh, Yi-Pin Lin & Sarah Dietrich - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):359-377.
    We posit a key goal of firms’ corporate social responsibility efforts is to influence reputation through carefully crafted communicative practices. This trend has accelerated with the rise of social media such as Twitter and Facebook, which are essentially public message networks that organizations are leveraging to engage with concerned audiences. Given the large number of messages sent on these sites, only some will be effective and achieve broad public resonance. Building on signaling theory, this paper asks whether and how messages (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility Failures: How Do Consumers Respond to Corporate Violations of Implied Social Contracts?Cristel Antonia Russell, Dale W. Russell & Heather Honea - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):759-773.
    This research documents consumers’ potential to monitor corporations’ License to Operate through their consumption responses to corporate social responsibility failures. The premise is that the type of social contracts or standards in place may determine how consumers, through their individual and collective behaviors, can play a direct role in influencing corporate behavior, when corporations fail to meet social responsibility standards. An experiment conducted with a large sample of consumers in the United States shows that consumers respond differently to a company’s (...)
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  • Transparency of Corporate Social Responsibility in Dutch Breweries.Lizet Quaak, Theo Aalbers & John Goedee - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (3):293-308.
    According to the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs (2001), transparency by means of Sustainability Reporting should lead to better Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) performance of companies. Sustainability Reporting should also give consumers the information they need to purchase the most sustainable products available (Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, 2004). This article analyses the driving factors influencing CSR and Sustainability Reporting at seven breweries in the Netherlands. It also gives a better understanding of organizational behaviour with reference to CSR and the (...)
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  • A Real Options Reasoning Approach to Corporate Social Responsibility : Integrating Real Option Sensemaking and CSR Orientation.Richard Peters, Ethan Waples & Peggy Golden - 2014 - Business and Society Review 119 (1):61-93.
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  • Processing Contradictory CSR Information: The Influence of Primacy and Recency Effects on the Consumer-Firm Relationship.Michael C. Peasley, Parker J. Woodroof & Joshua T. Coleman - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (2):275-289.
    Drawing on the influence of primacy and recency effects in processing information about corporate social responsibility, the authors examine how internal and external factors impact the consumer-firm relationship in the presence of contradictory CSR information. Evaluating these factors provides a more comprehensive understanding of how consumers react to unethical and socially irresponsible actions. Contrary to recent research that suggests a reactive CSR communication strategy to be best due to recency effects, the present findings show that past customer experiences with the (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility in International Business: Illustrations From Korean and Japanese Electronics MNEs in Indonesia.Young-Ryeol Park, Sangcheol Song, Soonkyoo Choe & Youjin Baik - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 129 (3):747-761.
    Employing Porter and Kramer’s corporate social responsibility framework, we explored the strategic CSR programs of two Korean and two Japanese electronics multinational enterprises in Indonesia. We observed that the sample MNEs engage in strategic CSR either through investment in competitive context or the transformation of value chain activities. In addition, these firms strongly favor strategic CSR over responsive CSR, not just because of the economic benefits offered by the former, but also its advantages in managing the programs and communicating with (...)
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  • When CEO Career Horizon Problems Matter for Corporate Social Responsibility: The Moderating Roles of Industry-Level Discretion and Blockholder Ownership.Won-Yong Oh, Young Kyun Chang & Zheng Cheng - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (2):279-291.
    This paper examines the influence of CEO career horizon problems on corporate social responsibility. We assume that as CEOs are getting older, they tend to disengage in CSR due to their shorter career horizons. We further argue that high levels of industry-level discretion and blockholder ownership amplify the negative effects of CEO age on CSR. Using a panel sample of US-based firms over 2004–2009, we do not find the main effect of CEO age on CSR, but find support for the (...)
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  • The Effect of Ownership Structure on Corporate Social Responsibility: Empirical Evidence From Korea. [REVIEW]Won Yong Oh, Young Kyun Chang & Aleksey Martynov - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):283-297.
    Relatively little research has examined the effects of ownership on the firms’ corporate social responsibility (CSR). In addition, most of it has been conducted in the Western context such as the U.S. and Europe. Using a sample of 118 large Korean firms, we hypothesize that different types of shareholders will have distinct motivations toward the firm’s CSR engagement. We break down ownership into different groups of shareholders: institutional, managerial, and foreign ownerships. Results indicate a significant, positive relationship between CSR ratings (...)
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  • One Vision, Different Paths: An Investigation of Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives in Europe.François Maon, Valérie Swaen & Adam Lindgreen - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (2):405-422.
    This comparative study explores 499 corporate social responsibility initiatives implemented by 178 corporations in five distinct, institutionally consistent European clusters. This study provides an empirically grounded response to calls to develop comprehensive, nuanced pictures of CSR in the composite European business environment. In so doing, the article stresses three distinct, non-exclusive approaches that characterize the embedding of CSR considerations in corporations’ strategies across Europe and the CSR challenges for corporations operating in different socio-political contexts. Furthermore, the study reaffirms the CSR (...)
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  • The Impact of Individual Attitudinal and Organisational Variables on Workplace Environmentally Friendly Behaviours.Danae Manika, Victoria K. Wells, Diana Gregory-Smith & Michael Gentry - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):663-684.
    Although research on corporate social responsibility has grown steadily, little research has focused on CSR at the individual level. In addition, research on the role of environmental friendly organizational citizenship behaviors within CSR initiatives is scarce. In response to this gap and recent calls for further research on both individual and organizational variables of employees’ environmentally friendly, or green, behaviors, this article sheds light on the influence of these variables on three types of green employee behaviors simultaneously: recycling, energy savings, (...)
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  • Do Customer Perceptions of Corporate Services Brand Ethicality Improve Brand Equity? Considering the Roles of Brand Heritage, Brand Image, and Recognition Benefits.Oriol Iglesias, Stefan Markovic, Jatinder Jit Singh & Vicenta Sierra - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (2):441-459.
    In order to be competitive in an era of ethical consumerism, brands are facing an ever-increasing pressure to integrate ethical values into their identities and to display their ethical commitment at a corporate level. Nevertheless, studies that relate business ethics to corporate brands are either theoretical or have predominantly been developed empirically in goods contexts. This is surprising, because corporate brands are more relevant in services settings, given the nature of services, and the fact that services settings comprise a greater (...)
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  • Conflict Minerals and Supply Chain Due Diligence: An Exploratory Study of Multi-Tier Supply Chains.Hannes Hofmann, Martin C. Schleper & Constantin Blome - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (1):115-141.
    As recently stakeholders complain about the use of conflict minerals in consumer products that are often invisible to them in final products, firms across industries implement conflict mineral management practices. Conflict minerals are those, whose systemic exploitation and trade contribute to human right violations in the country of extraction and surrounding areas. Particularly, supply chain managers in the Western world are challenged taking reasonable steps to identify and prevent risks associated with these resources due to the globally dispersed nature of (...)
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  • Social Role Conceptions and CSR Policy Success.Tobias Gössling & Chris Vocht - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):363-372.
    Businesses are eager to present themselves as honest and reliable corporate citizens who care about the overall well-being of society. This article researches whether different role conceptions of businesses regarding social issues are related to their success in dealing with social demands. Do socially active companies have a better social reputation than inactive companies? This relationship is determined by first extracting the social role conceptions of the companies from their Corporate Social Responsibility reports and then comparing this data to their (...)
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  • Ethical Challenges in Strategic Management: The 19th IESE International Symposium on Ethics, Business and Society.Joan Fontrodona, Joan Enric Ricart & Pascual Berrone - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (4):887-898.
    This paper is the Introduction to the Special Issue comprising a selection of papers submitted to the 19th IESE International Symposium on Ethics, Business and Society. The main topic of the Symposium was “Ethical Challenges in Strategic Management.” The paper presents the rationale and context of the Symposium. We begin with a brief historical overview of the evolution of the relationship between ethics and strategy. We propose four pillars that are at the core of a definition of strategy and elaborate (...)
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  • The Effect of Large Corporate Donors on Non-profit Performance.Andrew R. Finley, Curtis Hall, Erica Harris & Stephen J. Lusch - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 172 (3):463-485.
    Using a dataset of corporate philanthropic gifts of $1 million or more, we examine the influence of corporate donors on the performance of recipient non-profit organizations. We find that corporate donors positively influence NPO performance, specifically in the form of higher revenues per employee, program ratios, and fundraising returns. We find little evidence that large foundation or individual donors similarly enhance organizational performance. In additional analysis, we find that large corporate donations matter when the corporation is more likely to have (...)
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  • A Comparative Study of CSR in Pakistan!Mahnaz Fatima - 2017 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):81-129.
    This paper presents the state of corporate social responsibility in Pakistan since it has been driven in the country by the Securities and Exchange Commission of Pakistan, the UN Global Compact, and trade liberalization under the WTO. This study is based on responses obtained from 51 Pakistani companies and 20 MNCs. It was found that MNCs were found to be more socially responsible to customers, to suppliers in terms of their purchasing procedures, to the environment, to their employees, to the (...)
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  • Corporate Volunteering: A Bibliometric Analysis From 1990 to 2015.Suska Dreesbach-Bundy & Barbara Scheck - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (3):240-256.
    This article describes a quantitative examination of corporate volunteering research in the form of a bibliometric analysis. Using author, journal, geography, epistemological, and industry data from 115 refereed and 445 non-refereed publications published during 1990–2015, we identify corporate volunteering as a rather young research field. Although the field has progressively developed, it is still limited in magnitude, with recent signs of stagnation. The current state is characterized by moderate publication and author activity rates, with a shift toward more peer-reviewed publications (...)
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  • Eco-Labeled Products: Trend or Tools for Sustainability Strategies?Alessandra De Chiara - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (1):161-172.
    The paper offers a point of view on credibility of eco-labeled products, analyzing the relationships among company’s sustainable strategy, eco-label and no-financial reports. Based on a cross-sector study of 109 companies with the EU-Eco-label licenses in Italy, the paper points out different behaviors among the companies investigated and explains the leadership of Italy in the number of these licenses. However, the paper underlines that the use of sustainability tools is not always matched to the explanation of companies’ sustainable strategies. The (...)
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  • Business Ethics and Financial Reporting Quality: Evidence From Korea. [REVIEW]Tae Hee Choi & Jinhan Pae - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):403-427.
    This study examines the relationship between corporate commitment to business ethics and financial reporting quality. We posit that companies with a higher level of ethical commitment exhibit better quality financial reporting than those with a lower level of ethical commitment. Consistent with our prediction, we find that companies with a higher level of ethical commitment are engaged in less earnings management, report earnings more conservatively, and predict future cash flows more accurately than those with a lower level of ethical commitment. (...)
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  • Ecology-Driven Real Options: An Investment Framework for Incorporating Uncertainties in the Context of the Natural Environment.Timo Busch & Volker H. Hoffmann - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):295-310.
    The role of uncertainty within an organization’s environment features prominently in the business ethics and management literature, but how corporate investment decisions should proceed in the face of uncertainties relating to the natural environment is less discussed. From the perspective of ecological economics, the salience of ecology-induced issues challenges management to address new types of uncertainties. These pertain to constraints within the natural environment as well as to institutional action aimed at conserving the natural environment. We derive six areas of (...)
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  • The Amplifying and Buffering Effects of Virtuousness in Downsized Organizations.David S. Bright, Kim S. Cameron & Arran Caza - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):249-269.
    Virtuousness refers to the pursuit of the highest aspirations in the human condition. It is characterized by human impact, moral goodness, and unconditional societal betterment. Several writers have recently argued that corporations, in addition to being concerned with ethics, should also emphasize an ethos of virtuousness in corporate action. Virtuousness emphasizes actions that go beyond the “do no harm” assumption embedded in most ethical codes of conduct. Instead, it emphasizes the highest and best of the human condition. This research empirically (...)
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  • The Mediated Influence of a Traceability Label on Consumer’s Willingness to Buy the Labelled Product.Cosmina Bradu, Jacob L. Orquin & John Thøgersen - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (2):283-295.
    This paper investigates the effectiveness of a new traceability label on consumer willingness to buy the labelled product and whether the effect is mediated by moral affective evaluations of the product. A between-subjects factorial design was used to test the effect of a new traceability label on willingness to buy a chocolate bar, while controlling for different product features and whether this effect was mediated through the consumer’s moral affective evaluations of the product. A broad sample of 1,064 ordinary Danish (...)
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  • A Case Study of Stakeholder Dialogue in Professional Sport: An Example of CSR Engagement.Kathy Babiak & Lisa A. Kihl - 2018 - Business and Society Review 123 (1):119-149.
    Many businesses, including professional sport teams, are designing and engaging in socially responsible initiatives which benefit stakeholders as well as the businesses themselves. Gaining insight into stakeholders' expectations regarding corporations' corporate social responsibility initiatives through dialogue is important as the way a business is viewed and evaluated by stakeholders underlies subsequent interactions. Based on semi-structured interviews with 42 diverse stakeholders involved in a professional sport team's CSR initiative we found that stakeholders' expectations of the team's involvement in the community related (...)
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