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  1. Biotic Competition and Progress in the Works of Charles Darwin.John Nale - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (s1):36-42.
    Deutscher's reading of Darwin states that future generations are conditioned by the work of natural selection over long periods of time, whereby the random variations that are most favorable to the local conditions prevail over those organisms that are less well adapted. The work of this selection of the favorable varieties is not a human responsibility; rather, it lies in the hands of “chance.” However, I believe that, by prioritizing competition between organisms in the process of natural selection, Darwin in (...)
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  • Darwin’s Sublime: The Contest Between Reason and Imagination in On the Origin of Species. [REVIEW]Benjamin Sylvester Bradley - 2011 - Journal of the History of Biology 44 (2):205 - 232.
    Recent Darwin scholarship has provided grounds for recognising the Origin as a literary as well as a scientific achievement. While Darwin was an acute observer, a gifted experimentalist and indefatigable theorist, this essay argues that it was also crucial to his impact that the Origin transcended the putative divide between the scientific and the literary. Analysis of Darwin's development as a writer between his journal-keeping on HMS Beagle and his construction of the Origin argues the latter draws on the pattern (...)
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  • Separated at Birth: The Interlinked Origins of Darwin’s Unconscious Selection Concept and the Application of Sexual Selection to Race. [REVIEW]Stephen G. Alter - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (2):231 - 258.
    This essay traces the interlinked origins of two concepts found in Charles Darwin's writings: "unconscious selection," and sexual selection as applied to humanity's anatomical race distinctions. Unconscious selection constituted a significant elaboration of Darwin's artificial selection analogy. As originally conceived in his theoretical notebooks, that analogy had focused exclusively on what Darwin later would call "methodical selection," the calculated production of desired changes in domestic breeds. By contrast, unconscious selection produced its results unintentionally and at a much slower pace. Inspiration (...)
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  • Language, Subjectivity and the Agon: A Comparative Study of Nietzsche and Lyotard.James S. Pearson - 2015 - Logoi 1 (3):76-101.
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  • Trees, Coral, and Seaweed: An Interpretation of Sketches Found in Darwin’s Papers.Kees van Putten - 2020 - Journal of the History of Biology 53 (1):5-44.
    The sole diagram in On the Origin of Species is generally considered to be merely an illustration of Darwin’s ideas, but such an interpretation ignores the fact that Darwin himself expressly stated that the diagram helped him to discover and express his ideas. This article demonstrates that developing the so-called “tree diagram” substantially aided Darwin’s heuristics. This demonstration is based on an interpretation of the diagram and of 17 sketches found in Darwin’s scientific papers. The key to this interpretation is (...)
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  • Darwin’s Conversion: The Beagle Voyage and its Aftermath.Frank J. Sulloway - 1982 - Journal of the History of Biology 15 (3):325-396.
  • Darwin’s Sublime: The Contest Between Reason and Imagination in On the Origin of Species.Benjamin Sylvester Bradley - 2011 - Journal of the History of Biology 44 (2):205-232.
    Recent Darwin scholarship has provided grounds for recognising the Origin as a literary as well as a scientific achievement. While Darwin was an acute observer, a gifted experimentalist and indefatigable theorist, this essay argues that it was also crucial to his impact that the Origin transcended the putative divide between the scientific and the literary. Analysis of Darwin’s development as a writer between his journal-keeping on HMS Beagle and his construction of the Origin argues the latter draws on the pattern (...)
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  • On the Road to the Origin with Darwin, Hooker, and Gray.Duncan M. Porter - 1993 - Journal of the History of Biology 26 (1):1-38.
  • Darwin and His Finches: The Evolution of a Legend.Frank J. Sulloway - 1982 - Journal of the History of Biology 15 (1):1-53.
  • Darwin and Divergence: The Wallace Connection.Barbara G. Beddall - 1988 - Journal of the History of Biology 21 (1):1-68.
    Wallace's contributions to biological thought tend to be overlooked or overly praised, neither of which produces a satisfactory assessment. Examples of the latter tendency are the recent expositions by Brackman and Brooks; although both books contain much worthwhile material, both are flawed. At critical points their theories fail to measure up, Brackman's because of his misinterpretations of events in the month of June 1858, and Brooks's Darwin's September 5 letter to Gray could, and probably did, represent an ordering of his (...)
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  • “Curiously Parallel”: Analogies of Language and Race in Darwin’s Descent of Man. A Reply to Gregory Radick.Stephen G. Alter - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (3):355-358.
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  • Separated at Birth: The Interlinked Origins of Darwin’s Unconscious Selection Concept and the Application of Sexual Selection to Race.Stephen G. Alter - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (2):231-258.
    This essay traces the interlinked origins of two concepts found in Charles Darwin's writings: "unconscious selection," and sexual selection as applied to humanity's anatomical race distinctions. Unconscious selection constituted a significant elaboration of Darwin's artificial selection analogy. As originally conceived in his theoretical notebooks, that analogy had focused exclusively on what Darwin later would call "methodical selection," the calculated production of desired changes in domestic breeds. By contrast, unconscious selection produced its results unintentionally and at a much slower pace. Inspiration (...)
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  • “Curiously Parallel”: Analogies of Language and Race in Darwin's Descent of Man. A Reply to Gregory Radick.Stephen G. Alter - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (3):355-358.
    In the second chapter of The descent of man , Charles Darwin interrupted his discussion of the evolutionary origins of language to describe ten ways in which the formation of languages and of biological species were ‘curiously’ similar. I argue that these comparisons served mainly as analogies in which linguistic processes stood for aspects of biological evolution. Darwin used these analogies to recapitulate themes from On the origin of species , including common descent, genealogical classification, the struggle for existence, and (...)
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