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  1. Management, Political Philosophy, and Social Justice.Marian Eabrasu & David Carl Wilson - 2022 - Philosophy of Management 21 (3):281-287.
    This paper introduces the special theme on management and political philosophy, following a call for papers in the journal Philosophy of Management. The scope of this introduction is to emphasize the importance of political philosophy as a subtheme in the discipline of philosophy of management by shedding light on a cornerstone conversation: the role of the state in fostering corporate accountability for social injustice. For doing so, we present the papers invited to this special theme and show how they contribute (...)
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  • International Business, Human Rights, and Moral Complicity: A Call for a Declaration on the Universal Rights and Duties of Business.Robert E. Mcnulty W. Michael Hoffman - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (4):541-570.
    ABSTRACTThe purpose of this article is to call for the formulation and adoption of a declaration on the universal rights and duties of business. We do not attempt to define the specific contents of such a declaration, but rather attempt to explain why such a declaration is needed and what would be some of its general characteristics. The catalyst for this call was the recognition that even under optimal conditions, good companies sometimes are susceptible to moral lapses, and when companies (...)
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  • MNC Strategic Responses to Ethical Pressure: An Institutional Logic Perspective.Justin Tan & Liang Wang - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):373-390.
    In this study, we aim to investigate how multinational corporations (MNCs) balance ethical pressures from both the home and host countries. Drawing on theories from institutional theory, international business, and business ethics, we build a theoretical framework to explain the ethical behavior of MNCs. We apply the institutional logic concept to examine how MNCs with established logics and principles that have grown in the home country respond to local ethical expectations in the host country. We differentiate the core values from (...)
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  • Business Under Threat, Technology Under Attack, Ethics Under Fire: The Experience of Google in China.Justin Tan & Anna E. Tan - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):469-479.
    Although not frequently regarded as controversial, digital communications industries continue to be sites of CSR conflicts, particularly internationally. Investigating CSR issues in the digital communications industry is pertinent because in addition to being one of the fastest growing industries, it has created a host of new CSR issues that require further attention. This case study examines an incident in early 2010, when Google Inc. China and the Chinese government reached an impasse that produced a large-scale, transnational conflict that reached a (...)
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  • The debate on the moral responsibilities of online service providers.Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (6):1575-1603.
    Online service providers —such as AOL, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Twitter—significantly shape the informational environment and influence users’ experiences and interactions within it. There is a general agreement on the centrality of OSPs in information societies, but little consensus about what principles should shape their moral responsibilities and practices. In this article, we analyse the main contributions to the debate on the moral responsibilities of OSPs. By endorsing the method of the levels of abstract, we first analyse the moral responsibilities (...)
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  • Shareholders as Norm Entrepreneurs for Corporate Social Responsibility.Emma Sjöström - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):177 - 191.
    This article advances the idea that shareholders who seek to influence corporate behaviour can be understood analytically as norm entrepreneurs. These are actors who seek to persuade others to adopt a new standard of appropriateness. The article thus goes beyond studies which focus on the influence of shareholder activism on single instances of corporate conduct, as it recognises shareholders' potential as change agents for more widely shared norms about corporate responsibilities. The article includes the empirical example of US internet technology (...)
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  • International Business, Human Rights, and Moral Complicity: A Call for a Declaration on the Universal Rights and Duties of Business.W. Michael Hoffman & Robert E. Mcnulty - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (4):541-570.
  • Transnational Corporations and Human Rights Duties: Perfect and Imperfect.Jilles L. J. Hazenberg - 2016 - Human Rights Review 17 (4):479-500.
    This paper aims, firstly, to bridge debates on human rights and Transnational Corporations within practical philosophy and those within the business and human rights literature and, secondly, to determine the extent to which human rights duties can be assigned to TNCs. To justifiably assign human rights duties to TNCs, it is argued that these duties need to be grounded in moral theory. Through assessment of two approaches from practical philosophy, it is argued that positive duties cannot be assigned to TNCs (...)
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  • Leading and Following (Un) ethically in "Limen".Miguel Pina E. Cunha, Nuno Guimarães-Costa, Arménio Rego & Stewart R. Clegg - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):189-206.
    We propose a liminality-based analysis of the process of ethical leadership/followership in organizations. A liminal view presents ethical leadership as a process taking place in organizational contexts that are often characterized by high levels of ambiguity, which render the usual rules and preferences dubious or inadequate. In these relational spaces, involving leaders, followers, and their context, old frames may be questioned and new ones introduced in an emergent way, through subtle processes whose evolution and implications may not be easy to (...)
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  • Thomas Aquinas on Justice as a Global Virtue in Business.Claus Dierksmeier & Anthony Celano - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):247-272.
    Today’s globalized economy cannot be governed by legal strictures alone. A combination of self-interest and regulation is not enough to avoid the recurrence of its systemic crises. We also need virtues and a sense of corporate responsibility in order to assure the sustained success of the global economy. Yet whose virtues shall prevail in a pluralistic world? The moral theory of Thomas Aquinas meets the present need for a business ethics that transcends the legal realm by linking the ideas of (...)
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  • Freedom of Expression, Internet Responsibility, and Business Ethics: The Yahoo! Saga and Its Implications. [REVIEW]Raphael Cohen-Almagor - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (3):353-365.
    In the late 1990s, the Internet seemed a perfect medium for business: a facilitator of unlimited economical propositions to people without any regulatory limitations. Cases such as that of Yahoo! mark the beginning of the end of that illusion. They demonstrate that Internet service providers (ISPs) have to respect domestic state legislation in order to avoid legal risks. Yahoo! was wrong to ignore French national laws and the plea to remove Nazi memorabilia from its auction site. Its legal struggle proved (...)
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  • Corporate Responsibilities in Internet-Enabled Social Networks.Stephen Chen - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S4):523 - 536.
    As demonstrated by the popularity of social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, Internet-based social networks have become an important part of daily life, and many businesses are now involved in such networks either as service providers or as participants. Furthermore, inter-organizational networks are becoming an increasingly common feature of many industries, not only on the Internet. However, despite the growing importance of networks for businesses, there is little theoretical study on the social responsibilities of businesses in such networks, (...)
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  • Moral Commitments and the Societal Role of Business: An Ordonomic Approach to Corporate Citizenship.Ingo Pies, Stefan Hielscher & Markus Beckmann - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):375-401.
    This article introduces an “ordonomic” approach to corporate citizenship. We believe that ordonomics offers a conceptual framework for analyzing both the social structure and the semantics of moral commitments. We claim that such an analysis can provide theoretical guidance for the changing role of business in society, especially in regard to the expectation and trend that businesses take a political role and act as corporate citizens. The systematic raison d’être of corporate citizenship is that business firms can and—judged by the (...)
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