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Romanticism and the Sciences

Cambridge University Press (1990)

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  1. Moral Fibre: The Negotiation of Microscopic Facts in Victorian Britain. [REVIEW]L. S. Jacyna - 2003 - Journal of the History of Biology 36 (1):39 - 85.
    During the 1840s and 1850s the British embryologist and histologist Martin Barry (1802-1855) propounded a bold and original thesis about the microscopic structure of animal and vegetable tissue. He maintained that minute double spirals were virtually ubiquitous in the makeup of a wide range of structures. This paper considers how a claim of this kind was consonant with a romantic image of scientific creativity with which Barry identified. It describes his partially successful strategies to convince contemporaries of the veracity of (...)
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  • Evolution and ethics viewed from within two metaphors: machine and organism.Michael Ruse - 2022 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 44 (1):1-17.
    How is moral thinking, ethics, related to evolutionary theorizing? There are two approaches, epitomized by Charles Darwin who works under the metaphor of the world as a machine, and by Herbert Spencer who works under the metaphor of the world as an organism. Although the author prefers the first approach, the aim of this paper is to give a disinterested account of both approaches.
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  • Reflections on 25 Years of Journal Editorship.Michael R. Matthews - 2015 - Science & Education 24 (5-6):749-805.
    These reflections range over some distinctive features of the journal Science & Education, they acknowledge in a limited way the many individuals who over the past 25 years have contributed to the success and reputation of the journal, they chart the beginnings of the journal, and they dwell on a few central concerns—clear writing and the contribution of HPS to teacher education. The reflections also revisit the much-debated and written-upon philosophical and pedagogical arguments occasioned by the rise and possible demise (...)
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  • Romanticism and Romantic Science: Their Contribution to Science Education.Yannis Hadzigeorgiou & Roland Schulz - 2014 - Science & Education 23 (10):1963-2006.
  • A Family Discussion: The Herzens on the Science of Man.Irina Sirotkina - 2002 - History of the Human Sciences 15 (4):1-18.
    The article deals with the argument about free will and determinism between A. I. Herzen (1812—70) and his son, the physiologist A. A. Herzen (1839—1906). The topic, sufficiently familiar to Herzen scholars, interests me above all for its relevance to the history of science. The polemics between father and son touched upon such burning questions of the day as materialism in understanding human beings, positivism as scientific methodology, and the relation of the human sciences to the natural sciences. Seeing physiological (...)
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  • The Motives Behind Cantor’s Set Theory: Physical, Biological and Philosophical Questions.José Ferreirós - 2004 - Science in Context 17 (1/2):1–35.
    The celebrated “creation” of transfinite set theory by Georg Cantor has been studied in detail by historians of mathematics. However, it has generally been overlooked that his research program cannot be adequately explained as an outgrowth of the mainstream mathematics of his day. We review the main extra-mathematical motivations behind Cantor's very novel research, giving particular attention to a key contribution, the Grundlagen (Foundations of a general theory of sets) of 1883, where those motives are articulated in some detail. Evidence (...)
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  • Okkulte Aesthetik [Occult Aesthetics] by Timon L. Kuff; Thomas Manns Geisterebaron by Manfred Dierks.Andreas Sommer - 2014 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 27 (4).
    The physician, sexologist and psychical researcher Albert von Schrenck-Notzing was without a doubt one of the most unusual and controversial figures in the history of late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century German medicine and science. As a young student, he sought – together with his one-time mentor Carl du Prel, the philosopher-psychologist Max Dessoir and others – to expand the methodological and epistemological scope of fledgling German professionalized psychology by serving as an important conduit for strands of psychological experimentation from France and (...)
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  • Kant's intervention in the debate about race in the late eighteenth century.María Verónica Galfione - 2014 - Scientiae Studia 12 (1):11-43.
    El presente trabajo reconstruye algunos de los momentos principales del debate acerca del concepto de "raza humana" que tuvo lugar hacia finales del siglo xviii entre Kant, Forster y Herder. El objetivo de esta reconstrucción es mostrar, en una primera instancia, que esa polémica se hallaba determinada por la necesidad de adaptar las herramientas histórico-naturales heredadas a la emergencia de una concepción irreversible de la variable temporal. En un segundo momento, es analizada la posición asumida por Kant frente a los (...)
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  • Paul Erman: Experimentelle Elektrizitätsforschung zwischen romantischer Naturphilosophie und aufgeklärtem Rationalismus.Jörg Zaun - 2005 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 13 (1):33-43.
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  • Vital Anti-Mathematicism and the Ontology of the Emerging Life Sciences: From Mandeville to Diderot.Charles T. Wolfe - 2017 - Synthese:1-22.
    Intellectual history still quite commonly distinguishes between the episode we know as the Scientific Revolution, and its successor era, the Enlightenment, in terms of the calculatory and quantifying zeal of the former—the age of mechanics—and the rather scientifically lackadaisical mood of the latter, more concerned with freedom, public space and aesthetics. It is possible to challenge this distinction in a variety of ways, but the approach I examine here, in which the focus on an emerging scientific field or cluster of (...)
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  • The Meteorology and Medicine of the Romantic Era in Context: Henrik Steffens’ Ideas on Medical Meteorology (1811) and Its Reception by the Prussian State.Linda Richter - 2019 - NTM Zeitschrift für Geschichte der Wissenschaften, Technik und Medizin 27 (2):145-163.
    This article introduces to a wider public a hitherto unknown report written by the “Romantic” natural philosopher and mineralogist Henrik Steffens. In the 1811 report Ideas on Medical Meteorology, commissioned by the Prussian Ministry of the Interior via the physician Johann Christian Reil, Steffens argued for a new, “organic” perspective on meteorology focusing on interrelations between the atmosphere and diseases among humans and animals. This new outlook, he argued, was to be realized via a series of observations directed by the (...)
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  • A Dictionary Without Definitions: Romanticist Science in the Production and Presentation of the Grimm Brothers’ German Dictionary, 1838–1863.Kelly Kistner - 2014 - Science in Context 27 (4):683-707.
    ArgumentBetween 1838 and 1863 the Grimm brothers led a collaborative research project to create a new kind of dictionary documenting the history of the German language. They imagined the work would present a scientific account of linguistic cohesiveness and strengthen German unity. However, their dictionary volumes would be variously criticized for their idiosyncratic character and ultimately seen as a poor, and even prejudicial, piece of scholarship. This paper argues that such criticisms may reflect a misunderstanding of the dictionary. I claim (...)
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  • Problematic “Idiosyncrasies”: Rediscovering the Historical Context of D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson's Science of Form.Maurizio Esposito - 2014 - Science in Context 27 (1):79-107.
    ArgumentD’Arcy Thompson has often been portrayed as a loner. His science of form has frequently been labeled anachronistic, idiosyncratic, and unconnected to his contemporary biology. This article aims to challenge this interpretation. Thompson's representation as a loner did not lie in the idiosyncrasies of his science, but in our own historiography. Through the use of unedited archival sources, this study shows that Thompson's biology was well-connected to an international research program – a program mainly shared by developmental biologists, physiologists, and (...)
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  • Worlds in Collision: Owen and Huxley on the Brain.C. U. M. Smith - 1997 - Science in Context 10 (2):343-365.
  • On the Ministerial Archive of Academic Acts.William Clark - 1996 - Science in Context 9 (4).