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  1. Corporate Profit, Entrepreneurship Theory and Business Ethics.Radu Vranceanu - 2014 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 23 (1):50-68.
    Economic profit is produced by entrepreneurs, those special individuals able to detect and seize as yet unexploited market opportunities. Many large capitalist firms manage to deliver positive profits even in the most competitive environments. They can do so, thanks to internal entrepreneurs, a subset of their employees able to drive change and develop innovation in the workplace. This paper argues that the goal of increasing economic profit is fully consistent with the corporation doing good for society. However, there is little (...)
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  • Morality, Religious Writings, and Entrepreneurship Education: An Integrative Proposal Using the Example of Christian Narratives.Nuria Toledano & Crispen Karanda - 2017 - Journal of Moral Education 46 (2):195-211.
    Success and failure in entrepreneurship affects not only entrepreneurs but also many participants in their entrepreneurial relationships. Studies have led us to consider the social and moral dimensions within entrepreneurship education. Doubts arise, however, when one asks how moral principles can be included in entrepreneurship education in order to produce more socially responsible graduates. In the current debate, the role that religions may play in providing moral teachings for entrepreneurship is becoming increasingly important, and religious narratives as educational tools are (...)
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  • Prudent Entrepreneurship in Theory of Moral Sentiments.Kacey Reeves West - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-24.
    Adam Smith writes favorably about innovation in Wealth of Nations while writing unfavorably about a figure associated with innovation: the projector. His criticism of projectors prompts many scholars to claim that Smith disapproves of entrepreneurship. But Smith criticizes the projector not because he acts as an entrepreneur but because he fails to meet Smith’s moral standards for entrepreneurship. In Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith conceives of a framework for moral entrepreneurship based on prudence. The framework consists of two principles: first, (...)
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  • Contextualization of Religion and Entrepreneurial Performance: A Lens of Buddhist Small Business Entrepreneurs.Lufina Mahadewi, Surachman Surachman, Djumilah Hadiwidjojo & Nur Khusniyah Indrawati - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    This study explores the manifestation of Buddhism's conception in underlying entrepreneurial performance. The study is a qualitative research approach with a development direction that comes from successful Buddhist small business entrepreneurs in Bekasi, Indonesia. The interpretive paradigm is used to interpret social life in the reality of successful Buddhist small business entrepreneurs on entrepreneurial performance. Data collection using in-depth interviews with Buddhist small business entrepreneurs in an open-ended format. Data analysis was done in many stages, including domain analysis, taxonomy analysis, (...)
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  • Ethical Judgment and Radical Business Changes: The Role of Entrepreneurial Perspicacity.Massimiliano Matteo Pellegrini & Cristiano Ciappei - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (4):769-788.
    This study examines the implications of practical reason for entrepreneurial activities. Our study is based on Thomas Aquinas’ interpretation of such virtue, with a particular focus on the partition of practical reason in potential parts such as synesis, or common sense, and gnome, or perspicacity. Since entrepreneurial acts and actions deal with extremely uncertain situations, we argue that only this perspicacity, as the ability of correctly judging in exceptional cases, has the power to find wisdom under such blurred conditions. Perspicacity (...)
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  • The Common Good of Business: Addressing a Challenge Posed by «Caritas in Veritate». [REVIEW]Alejo José G. Sison & Joan Fontrodona - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (S1):99-107.
    Caritas in Veritate (CV) poses a challenge to the business community when it asks for “a profoundly new way of understanding business enterprise” (CV 40). The paper proposes the concept of the “common good” as a starting point for the discussion and sketches a definition of the common good of business as the path toward an answer for this challenge. Building on the distinction between the material and the formal parts of the common good, the authors characterize profit as the (...)
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  • Thomas Aquinas on Justice as a Global Virtue in Business.Claus Dierksmeier & Anthony Celano - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):247-272.
    Today’s globalized economy cannot be governed by legal strictures alone. A combination of self-interest and regulation is not enough to avoid the recurrence of its systemic crises. We also need virtues and a sense of corporate responsibility in order to assure the sustained success of the global economy. Yet whose virtues shall prevail in a pluralistic world? The moral theory of Thomas Aquinas meets the present need for a business ethics that transcends the legal realm by linking the ideas of (...)
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  • Unexpected Lives: The Intersection of Islam and Arab Women’s Entrepreneurship.Hayfaa A. Tlaiss & Maura McAdam - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (2):253-272.
    This paper explores how Islam is understood by Muslim women entrepreneurs and considers its influence on their entrepreneurial experiences in the country-specific context of Lebanon. In so doing, we adopt a qualitative interpretative approach, drawing upon 21 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with women entrepreneurs. Accordingly, we present empirical evidence detailing how Muslim women entrepreneurs utilise various aspects and teachings of Islam to make sense of their entrepreneurial decisions. We thus provide insight into how women’s entrepreneurship interlocks with Islamic teachings and the (...)
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  • Christian Ethics and Spirituality in Leading Business Organizations: Editorial Introduction.Domènec Melé & Joan Fontrodona - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (4):671-679.
    Christian ethics applied to economics and business has a long tradition. This dates back at least to the thirteenth century, with noteworthy developments in the four following centuries and again in the last century. Christian faith and reason intertwine to bring about principles, criteria, and guidelines for action and a set of virtues with relevance for economic activity. Christian spirituality, with 2000 years of history, has been embedded in Christianity from its beginning, but the application to modern business activity is (...)
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  • Corporate Sustainability: Toward a Theoretical Integration of Catholic Social Teaching and the Natural-Resource-Based View of the Firm.Horacio E. Rousseau - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (4):725-737.
    Even though management scholars have offered several views on the process of corporate sustainability, these efforts have focused mainly on the technical aspects of sustainability while omitting the fundamental role played by individual moral competences. Therefore, previous work offers an incomplete and somewhat reductionist view of corporate sustainability. In this article, we develop a holistic framework of corporate sustainability in which both the moral and technical aspects of sustainability are considered. We do so by integrating the ethical, normative perspective of (...)
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  • When Does Christian Religion Matter for Entrepreneurial Activity? The Contingent Effect of a Country’s Investments Into Knowledge.K. Praveen Parboteeah, Sascha G. Walter & Jörn H. Block - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):447-465.
    This study furthers scholarship on the religion-entrepreneurship link by proposing that aspects of a country’s religious profile impact individual entrepreneurial activity differently and that a country’s level of investments in knowledge serves as a contingency factor in this milieu. Our cross-level analyses of data from 9,266 individuals and 27 predominantly Christian countries support the second, but not the first suggestion. The study contributes to a more nuanced understanding of religion’s role for entrepreneurship and bridges the literatures on religion and knowledge-based (...)
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  • From Rational to Wise Action: Recasting Our Theories of Entrepreneurship.Laura C. Dunham - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):513-530.
    In this article, I argue that if we challenge some tacit assumptions of narrow rationality that endure in much of entrepreneurial studies, we can elevate entrepreneurial ethics beyond mere external constraints on rational action, and move toward fuller integration of ethics as an intrinsic part of the process of value creation itself. To this end, I propose the concept of practical wisdom as a framework for exploring entrepreneurial decision making and action that can broaden the scope of our research to (...)
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  • Personal Values as A Catalyst for Corporate Social Entrepreneurship.Christine A. Hemingway - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (3):233-249.
    The literature acknowledges a distinction between immoral, amoral and moral management. This paper makes a case for the employee (at any level) as a moral agent, even though the paper begins by highlighting a body of evidence which suggests that individual moral agency is sacrificed at work and is compromised in deference to other pressures. This leads to a discussion about the notion of discretion and an examination of a separate, contrary body of literature which indicates that some individuals in (...)
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  • Religious Approaches on Business Ethics: Current Situation and Future Perspectives.Domènec Melé - 2015 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 6 (6):137-160.
    The Business Ethics Movement began in the mid-1970s. For the first two decades philosophical theories were dominant, but in recent years an increasing presence of religious approaches, in both empirical and conceptual research, can be noted, in spite of some objections to the presence of religions in the business ethics field. Empirical research, generally based on psychological and sociological studies, shows the influence of religious faith on several business issues. Conceptual research includes a variety of business ethics issues studied from (...)
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  • Corporate Sustainability: Toward a Theoretical Integration of Catholic Social Teaching and the Natural-Resource-Based View of the Firm.Horacio E. Rousseau - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (4):725-737.
    Even though management scholars have offered several views on the process of corporate sustainability, these efforts have focused mainly on the technical aspects of sustainability while omitting the fundamental role played by individual moral competences. Therefore, previous work offers an incomplete and somewhat reductionist view of corporate sustainability. In this article, we develop a holistic framework of corporate sustainability in which both the moral and technical aspects of sustainability are considered. We do so by integrating the ethical, normative perspective of (...)
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