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  1. Colloquium 3: Why Beauty is Truth in All We Know: Aesthetics and Mimesis in Neoplatonic Science1.Marije Martijn - 2010 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 25 (1):69-108.
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  • Proclus on Nature: Philosophy of Nature and its Methods in Proclus’ Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus.Marije Martijn - 2010 - Brill.
    One of the hardest questions to answer for a (Neo)platonist is to what extent and how the changing and unreliable world of sense perception can itself be an object of scientific knowledge. My dissertation is a study of the answer given to that question by the Neoplatonist Proclus (Athens, 411-485) in his Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus. I present a new explanation of Proclus’ concept of nature and show that philosophy of nature consists of several related subdisciplines matching the ontological stratification (...)
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  • Geometrical Objects as Properties of Sensibles: Aristotle’s Philosophy of Geometry.Emily Katz - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (4):465-513.
    There is little agreement about Aristotle’s philosophy of geometry, partly due to the textual evidence and partly part to disagreement over what constitutes a plausible view. I keep separate the questions ‘What is Aristotle’s philosophy of geometry?’ and ‘Is Aristotle right?’, and consider the textual evidence in the context of Greek geometrical practice, and show that, for Aristotle, plane geometry is about properties of certain sensible objects—specifically, dimensional continuity—and certain properties possessed by actual and potential compass-and-straightedge drawings qua quantitative and (...)
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  • Plato's Theory of Numbers-Principles and its Importance to the Philosophical Reconstruction of Plato's Dialectics.Fabián Mié - 2011 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 6:99-108.
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  • Colloquium 6: Physica More Geometrico Demonstrata: Natural Philosophy in Proclus and Aristotle.Dmitri Nikulin - 2003 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):183-221.
  • Why Can't Geometers Cut Themselves on the Acutely Angled Objects of Their Proofs? Aristotle on Shape as an Impure Power.Brad Berman - 2017 - Méthexis 29 (1):89-106.
    For Aristotle, the shape of a physical body is perceptible per se (DA II.6, 418a8-9). As I read his position, shape is thus a causal power, as a physical body can affect our sense organs simply in virtue of possessing it. But this invites a challenge. If shape is an intrinsically powerful property, and indeed an intrinsically perceptible one, then why are the objects of geometrical reasoning, as such, inert and imperceptible? I here address Aristotle’s answer to that problem, focusing (...)
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  • Mathematical Abstraction, Conceptual Variation and Identity.Jean-Pierre Marquis - 2014 - In Peter Schroeder-Heister, Gerhard Heinzmann, Wilfred Hodges & Pierre Edouard Bour (eds.), Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, Proceedings of the 14th International Congress. London, UK: pp. 299-322.
    One of the key features of modern mathematics is the adoption of the abstract method. Our goal in this paper is to propose an explication of that method that is rooted in the history of the subject.
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  • Colloquium 1: Atomism in the Old Academy.John Dillon - 2004 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):1-17.
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  • Why Skeptics Paint, or Imagining “Skepoiesis”: Un-Knowing and Re-Knowing Aesthetics Martin Ovens.Martin Ovens - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 1 (1):33-61.
    ABSTRACTTwo distinct domains of philosophic enquiry are selected in order to disclose the core dynamics and concerns of a particular mode of “aesthetic skepsis”. Aspects of philosophy of cosmology and philosophy of infinity are considered in ways that serve to discipline the diminution of “belief” and the cultivation of creativity. The journey begins with a skeptic ego that is phenomenologically “empty” but wedded to a rhetoric of “darkness and light.” The result is a skepsis that needs to recapture and reconfigure (...)
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  • Polarity and Inseparability: The Foundation of the Apodictic Portion of Aristotle's Modal Logic.Dwayne Raymond - 2010 - History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (3):193-218.
    Modern logicians have sought to unlock the modal secrets of Aristotle's Syllogistic by assuming a version of essentialism and treating it as a primitive within the semantics. These attempts ultimately distort Aristotle's ontology. None of these approaches make full use of tests found throughout Aristotle's corpus and ancient Greek philosophy. I base a system on Aristotle's tests for things that can never combine (polarity) and things that can never separate (inseparability). The resulting system not only reproduces Aristotle's recorded results for (...)
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  • On the “Perceptible Bodies” at De Generatione Et Corruptione II.1.Timothy J. Crowley - 2019 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 27:e2703.
    Near the beginning of De Gen. et Cor. II.1, Aristotle claims that the generation and corruption of all naturally constituted substances are “not without the perceptible bodies”. It is not clear what he intends by this. In this paper I offer a new interpretation of this assertion. I argue that the assumption behind the usual reading, namely, that these “perceptible bodies” ought to be distinguished from the naturally constituted substances, is flawed, and that the assertion is best understood as a (...)
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  • Reflections on Metaphysics M and N: Considerations regarding the place, content, method and purpose of the last two books of Metaphysics.Francisco Marambio-Garrido - 2021 - Veritas – Revista de Filosofia da Pucrs 49:71-91.
    Resumen En el presente artículo se explora la pertenencia de los libros M y N al programa general de la Metafísica de Aristóteles. Los libros XIII y XIV han quedado en el trasfondo de la Metafísica, como una suerte de agregado editorial, del cual se puede prescindir para la comprensión de la propuesta aristotélica. En el presente artículo, sin embargo, se asume un punto de partida diferente, que consiste en integrar estos libros al núcleo de la propuesta de la Metafísica, (...)
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  • Aristotle's Theory of Abstraction.Allan Bäck - 2014 - Cham, Switzerland: Springer.
    This book investigates Aristotle’s views on abstraction and explores how he uses it. In this work, the author follows Aristotle in focusing on the scientific detail first and then approaches the metaphysical claims, and so creates a reconstructed theory that explains many puzzles of Aristotle’s thought. Understanding the details of his theory of relations and abstraction further illuminates his theory of universals. Some of the features of Aristotle’s theory of abstraction developed in this book include: abstraction is a relation; perception (...)
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  • The Two-Triangle Universe of Plato’s Timaeus and the In(de)Finite Diversity of the Universe.Salomon Ofman & Luc Brisson - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):493-518.
    In the present article, we consider the question of the primary elements in Plato’s Timaeus, the components of the whole universe reduced, by an extraordinarily elegant construction, to two right triangles. But how does he reconcile such a model with the infinite diversity of the universe? A large part of this study is devoted to Cornford’s explanation in his commentary of the Timaeus and its shortcomings, in order to finally propose a revised one, which we think to be entirely consistent (...)
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  • Ciencia y dialéctica en Acerca del cielo de Aristóteles.Manuel Berron - 2016 - Ediciones UNL.
  • Connecting Information with Scientific Method: Darwin’s Significance for Epistemology. [REVIEW]Matthias Kuhle & Sabine Kuhle - 2010 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (2):333 - 357.
    Theories of epistemology make reference—via the perspective of an observer—to the structure of information transfer, which generates reality, of which the observer himself forms a part. It can be shown that any epistemological approach which implies the participation of tautological structural elements in the information transfer necessarily leads to an antinomy. Nevertheless, since the time of Aristotle the paradigm of mathematics—and thus tautological structure—has always been a hidden ingredient in the various concepts of knowledge acquisition or general theories of information (...)
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  • Iamblichus and the Foundations of Late Platonism.Eugene V. Afonasin, John M. Dillon & John Finamore (eds.) - 2012 - Brill.
    Drawing on recent scholarship and delving systematically into Iamblichean texts, these ten papers establish Iamblichus as the great innovator of Neoplatonic philosophy who broadened its appeal for future generations of philosophers.
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  • Connecting Information with Scientific Method: Darwin’s Significance for Epistemology.Matthias Kuhle & Sabine Kuhle - 2010 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (2):333-357.
    Theories of epistemology make reference—via the perspective of an observer—to the structure of information transfer, which generates reality, of which the observer himself forms a part. It can be shown that any epistemological approach which implies the participation of tautological structural elements in the information transfer necessarily leads to an antinomy. Nevertheless, since the time of Aristotle the paradigm of mathematics—and thus tautological structure—has always been a hidden ingredient in the various concepts of knowledge acquisition or general theories of information (...)
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  • The Platonist Absurd Accumulation of Geometrical Objects: Metaphysics Μ.2.José Edgar González-Varela - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (1):76-115.
    In the first argument of Metaphysics Μ.2 against the Platonist introduction of separate mathematical objects, Aristotle purports to show that positing separate geometrical objects to explain geometrical facts generates an ‘absurd accumulation’ of geometrical objects. Interpretations of the argument have varied widely. I distinguish between two types of interpretation, corrective and non-corrective interpretations. Here I defend a new, and more systematic, non-corrective interpretation that takes the argument as a serious and very interesting challenge to the Platonist.
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  • An Absurd Accumulation: Metaphysics M.2, 1076b11-36.Emily Katz - 2014 - Phronesis 59 (4):343-368.
    The opening argument in the Metaphysics M.2 series targeting separate mathematical objects has been dismissed as flawed and half-hearted. Yet it makes a strong case for a point that is central to Aristotle’s broader critique of Platonist views: if we posit distinct substances to explain the properties of sensible objects, we become committed to an embarrassingly prodigious ontology. There is also something to be learned from the argument about Aristotle’s own criteria for a theory of mathematical objects. I hope to (...)
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  • La filosofía de las matemáticas de Aristóteles.Miguel Martí Sánchez - 2017 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 52:43-66.
    La filosofía de las matemáticas de Aristóteles es una investigación acerca de tres asuntos diferentes pero complementarios: el lugar epistemológico de las matemáticas en el organigrama de las ciencias teoréticas o especulativas; el estudio del método usado por el matemático para elaborar sus doctrinas, sobre todo la geometría y la aritmética; y la averiguación del estatuto ontológico de las entidades matemáticas. Para comprender lo peculiar de la doctrina aristotélica es necesario tener en cuenta que su principal interés está en poner (...)
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  • Some Aspects of the Theory of Abstraction in Plotinus and Iamblichus.Claudia Maggi - 2015 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 9 (2):159-176.
    _ Source: _Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 159 - 176 The purpose of this paper is the analysis of the Plotinian and Iamblichean reading of the Aristotelian theory of abstraction, and its relationship with the status of mathematical entities, as they were conceived within a Platonic model, according to which mathematical objects are ontological autonomous and separate.
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  • Dialéctica, Diaporetica y Saber Positivo En la Metafísica de Aristóteles.Aguirre Javier - 2010 - Endoxa 26:11.
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  • Commentary on Lewis.Dirk T. D. Held - 1998 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):22-29.
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  • Platonic Number in the Parmenides and Metaphysics XIII.Dougal Blyth - 2000 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 8 (1):23 – 45.
    I argue here that a properly Platonic theory of the nature of number is still viable today. By properly Platonic, I mean one consistent with Plato's own theory, with appropriate extensions to take into account subsequent developments in mathematics. At Parmenides 143a-4a the existence of numbers is proven from our capacity to count, whereby I establish as Plato's the theory that numbers are originally ordinal, a sequence of forms differentiated by position. I defend and interpret Aristotle's report of a Platonic (...)
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  • Aristotle and Mathematics.Henry Mendell - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.