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Pity and compassion as social virtues

Philosophy 74 (3):411-429 (1999)

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  1. Compassion and Professional Care: Exploring the Domain.Margreet van der Cingel - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (2):124-136.
    Compassion unites people during times of suffering and distress. Unfortunately, compassion cannot take away suffering. Why then, is compassion important for people who suffer? Nurses work in a domain where human suffering is evidently present. In order to give meaning to compassion in the domain of professional care, it is necessary to describe what compassion is. The purpose of this paper is to explore questions and contradictions in the debate on compassion related to nursing care. The paper reviews classical philosophers (...)
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  • On the Suffering of Compassion.Peter Nilsson - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (1):125-144.
    Compassion is often described in terms of suffering. This paper investigates the nature of this suffering. It is argued that compassion involves suffering of a particular kind. To begin with a case is made for the negative claim that compassion does not involve an ordinary, or afflictive, suffering over something. Secondly, it is argued that the suffering of compassion is a suffering for someone else’s sake: If you feel compassion for another person, P, then you suffer over P:s suffering for (...)
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  • Compassion in Care: A Qualitative Study of Older People with a Chronic Disease and Nurses.M. van der Cingel - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (5):672-685.
    This article describes compassion as perceived within the relationship between nurses and older persons with a chronic disease. The aim of the study is to understand the benefit of compassion for nursing practice within the context of long-term care. The design of the study involves a qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with nurses and patients in three different care-settings. Results show the nature of compassion in seven dimensions: attentiveness, listening, confronting, involvement, helping, presence and understanding. Analysis of the data also (...)
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  • David Hume’s Notion of Personal Identity: Implications for Identity Construction and Affective Communal Living in Africana Societies.Lawrence Bamikole - 2014 - Philosophy Study 4 (4).
  • Understanding the Phenomenon: A Comparative Study of Compassion of the West and Karuna of the East.Parattukudi Augustine & Melville Wayne - 2019 - Asian Philosophy 29 (1):1-19.
    ABSTRACTThis article aims to bring some understanding to the phenomenon called compassion. The use of particular linguistic expressions to denote the phenomenon of compassion in the East and West can confuse us, as those terms are embedded in unique cultural settings. This article undertakes a historical, etymological, and philosophical exploration of the terms, compassion and karuna. The article will include a short literature review of these concepts and an investigation of the differences and similarities between them. The concluding speculation is (...)
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  • The Trouble with Environmental Values.Simon P. James - 2016 - Environmental Values 25 (2):131-144.
    If we are to assess whether our attitudes towards nature are morally, aesthetically or in any other way appropriate or inappropriate, then we will need to know what those attitudes are. Drawing on the works of Katie McShane, Alan Holland and Christine Swanton, I challenge the common assumption that to love, respect, honour, cherish or adopt any other sort of pro-attitude towards any natural X simply is to value X in some way and to some degree. Depending on how one (...)
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  • Compassion and Beyond.Roger Crisp - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (3):233-246.
    This paper is a discussion of the emotion of compassion or pity, and the corresponding virtue. It begins by placing the emotion of compassion in the moral conceptual landscape, and then moves to reject the currently dominant view, a version of Aristotelianism developed by Martha Nussbaum, in favour of a non-cognitive conception of compassion as a feeling. An alternative neo-Aristotelian account is then outlined. The relation of the virtue of compassion to other virtues is plotted, and some doubts sown about (...)
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