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The Great New Wilderness Debate

University of Georgia Press (1998)

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  1. Nature Above People: Rolston and "Fortress" Conservation in the South.Hanna Siurua - 2006 - Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):71-96.
    : Holmes Rolston III has argued that in some situations where the needs of starving people come into conflict with the protection of natural values, "we" ought to prioritize the latter. Focusing on the threat to pristine ecosystems and endangered species posed by overpopulation in developing countries, Rolston advocates the exclusion of human settlement and activity from the most fragile and valuable wild areas—a strategy sometimes termed "fortress conservation." This approach suffers from at least three serious faults. First, fortress conservation (...)
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  • Nature Above Peoplerolston And?Fortress? Conservation in the South.Hanna Siurua - 2006 - Ethics and the Environment 11 (1):72-96.
  • Beyond Leave No Trace.Gregory L. Simon & Peter S. Alagona - 2009 - Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (1):17-34.
    Leave No Trace has become the official education and outreach policy for managing recreational use in parks and wilderness areas throughout the United States. It is based on seven core principles that seek to minimize impacts from backcountry recreational activities such as hiking, climbing, and camping. In this paper, we review the history and current practice of Leave No Trace in the United States, including its complex role in the global political economy of outdoor recreation. We conclude by suggesting a (...)
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  • The Smell of Nature: Olfaction, Knowledge and the Environment.Daniel Press & Steven C. Minta - 2000 - Philosophy and Geography 3 (2):173-186.
    Olfaction offers unique entry into the non-human world, but Western culture constrains such opportunities because of the dominance of the visual mode of perception. We begin by briefly reviewing philosophical arguments against olfaction as a reliable cognitive input. We then build a biological case for the similarity of non-human and human olfaction. Subsequently, we argue that some contemporary societies still make use of olfaction for organizing themselves in space and time. We end by suggesting that olfaction offers promise for advancing (...)
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  • The Smell of Nature: Olfaction, Knowledge and the Environment.Daniel Press & Steven C. Minta - 2000 - Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (2):173 – 186.
    Olfaction offers unique entry into the non-human world, but Western culture constrains such opportunities because of the dominance of the visual mode of perception. We begin by briefly reviewing philosophical arguments against olfaction as a reliable cognitive input. We then build a biological case for the similarity of non-human and human olfaction. Subsequently, we argue that some contemporary societies still make use of olfaction for organizing themselves in space and time. We end by suggesting that olfaction offers promise for advancing (...)
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  • Restoring Misplaced Epistemology.Christopher J. Preston - 2005 - Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (3):373 – 384.
    Grounding Knowledge is written partly out of a sense of celebration and partly out of a sense of consternation. The celebration is generated by the feeling that epistemology has started to explore...
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  • Colonization, Urbanization, and Animals.Clare Palmer - 2003 - Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):47 – 58.
    Urbanization and development of green spaces is continuing worldwide. Such development frequently engulfs the habitats of native animals, with a variety of effects on their existence, location and ways of living. This paper attempts to theorize about some of these effects, drawing on aspects of Foucault's discussions of power and using a metaphor of human colonization, where colonization is understood as an "ongoing process of dispossession, negotiation, transformation, and resistance." It argues that a variety of different kinds of human/animal power (...)
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  • Animals, Colonisation and Urbanisation.Clare Palmer - 2003 - Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):47-58.
    Urbanization and development of green spaces is continuing worldwide. Such development frequently engulfs the habitats of native animals, with a variety of effects on their existence, location and ways of living. This paper attempts to theorize about some of these effects, drawing on aspects of Foucault's discussions of power and using a metaphor of human colonization, where colonization is understood as an "ongoing process of dispossession, negotiation, transformation, and resistance." It argues that a variety of different kinds of human/animal power (...)
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  • Wilderness, Cultivation and Appropriation.John O'Neill - 2002 - Philosophy and Geography 5 (1):35 – 50.
    "Nature" and "wilderness" are central normative categories of environmentalism. Appeal to those categories has been subject to two lines of criticism: from constructivists who deny there is something called "nature" to be defended; from the environmental justice movement who point to the role of appeals to "nature" and "wilderness" in the appropriation of land of socially marginal populations. While these arguments often come together they are independent. This paper develops the second line of argument by placing recent appeals to "wilderness" (...)
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  • Wilderness and the Wise Province: Benton Mackaye's Pragmatic Vision.Ben A. Minteer - 2001 - Philosophy and Geography 4 (2):185 – 202.
    Benton MacKaye's name is rarely evoked in the fields of environmental history and philosophy. The author of the Appalachian Trail in the early 1920s and a co-founder of the Wilderness Society with Aldo Leopold and Bob Marshall in the 1930s, MacKaye's unique contribution to American environmental thought is seldom recognized. This neglect is particularly egregious in the current debate over the intellectual foundations of the American wilderness idea, a discussion to which I believe MacKaye has much to contribute. Specifically, I (...)
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  • Toward a Dirty Environmental Ethics: From Theoria to Techné: Mark Coeckelbergh: Environmental Skill: Motivation, Knowledge, and the Possibility of a Non-Romantic Environmental Ethics, Routledge, New York, 2015, 218 Pp+Index, ISBN: 978-1-138-88557-8.Glen Miller & Tong Li - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (5):1453-1459.
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  • Walking in Nature: Thoreau’s Local Ambles or Muir’s Wilderness Treks?Jason P. Matzke - 2012 - Environment, Space, Place 4 (2):75-88.
    It has been argued by philosophers and cultural historians that the notion of wilderness as it has been developed in the West problematically separates—conceptually and practically—humans from wild nature. The human/wilderness dichotomy, it is said, potentially leads even well-intentioned, environmentally minded people to work for wilderness preservation at the expense of paying attention to our local, lived environment. Although Henry David Thoreau and John Muir are often taken to be key architects of the inherited notion of wilderness, I draw from (...)
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  • Revisiting 'Beyond Leave No Trace'.Jeffrey L. Marion, Ben Lawhon, Wade M. Vagias & Peter Newman - 2011 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):231 - 237.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 231-237, June 2011.
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  • Against Hybridism: Why We Need to Distinguish Between Nature and Society, Now More Than Ever.Andreas Malm - 2019 - Historical Materialism 27 (2):156-187.
    It is fashionable to argue that nature and society are obsolete categories. The two, we are told, can no longer be distinguished from one another; continuing loyalty to the ‘binary’ of the natural and the social blinds us to the logic of current ecological crises. This article outlines an argument for the opposite position: now more than ever – particularly in our rapidly warming world – we need to sift out the social components from the natural, if we wish to (...)
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  • Some Political Problems for Rewilding Nature.John Hintz - 2007 - Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (2):177 – 216.
    Recent studies in conservation biology have provided the wilderness preservation movement with a spark. Wilderness, we are told, can no longer be seen as a scenic playground for weary humans - it is, rather, an ecological necessity for the conservation of biodiversity. This paper traces the science and political ideologies that inspire and inform this reinvigorated cadre of environmentalists. Through empirical investigations of one prominent conservation group and one conservation campaign, the author finds that this environmentalism offers simplistic and purportedly (...)
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  • Special Claims From Improvement: A Comment on Armstrong.Clare Heyward & Dominic Lenzi - 2021 - Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric 13 (1):17-32.
    Chris Armstrong argues that attempts at justifying special claims over natural resources generally take one of two forms: arguments from improvement and arguments from attachment. We argue that Armstrong fails to establish that the distinction between natural resources and improved resources has no normative significance. He succeeds only in showing that ‘improvers’ are not necessarily entitled to the full exchange value of the improvement. It can still be argued that the value of natural and improved resources should be distributed on (...)
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  • Reconsidering Wilderness: Prospective Ethics for Nature, Technology, and Society.David Havlick - 2006 - Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (1):47 – 62.
    In this paper I seek to reconsider wilderness against recent critiques that portray it as necessarily contributing to a separation between nature and society. By examining the historical and contemporary contexts for designating wilderness areas in the United States, I propose that these wilderness lands and their particular constraints on the use of certain technologies may in fact present integrative, open spaces for considering how to live ethical, technological lives in contemporary society. An examination of actual wilderness practices illustrates how (...)
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  • Wildness Without Naturalness.Benjamin Hale, Adam Amir & Alexander Lee - 2021 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 24 (1):16-26.
    ABSTRACT Some fear the Anthropocene heralds the end of nature, while others argue that nature will persist throughout the Anthropocene. Still others worry that acknowledging the Anthropocene grants humanity broad license to further inject itself into nature. We propose that this debate rests on a conflation between naturalness and wildness. Where naturalness is best understood as fundamentally a metaphysical category, wildness can be better understood as an inter-relational category. The raccoons in cities, the deer in suburban yards, the coyotes hunting (...)
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  • The Moral Considerability of Invasive Transgenic Animals.Benjamin Hale - 2006 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (4):337-366.
    The term moral considerability refers to the question of whether a being or set of beings is worthy of moral consideration. Moral considerability is most readily afforded to those beings that demonstrate the clearest relationship to rational humans, though many have also argued for and against the moral considerability of species, ecosystems, and “lesser” animals. Among these arguments there are at least two positions: “environmentalist” positions that tend to emphasize the systemic relations between species, and “liberationist” positions that tend to (...)
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  • Bioregionalism and Cross-Cultural Dialogue on a Land Ethic.Richard Evanoff - 2007 - Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (2):141 – 156.
    This paper argues against the view that a single environmental ethic can be formulated that could be universally applied in all geographic settings and across cultures. The paper specifically criticizes Callicott's proposal that Leopold's land ethic be adopted as a global environment ethic, and develops an alternative bioregional perspective which suggests that while there can be a great deal of variety in how different cultures think about and interact with their local environments, there is nonetheless the need for cross-cultural dialogue (...)
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  • The Return of the Wild in the Anthropocene. Wolf Resurgence in the Netherlands.Martin Drenthen - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):318-337.
    In most rewilding projects, humans are still the agents in control: it is us who decide to no longer want to fully control nature. Spontaneous rewilding changes the nature of this game. Once we are confronted with species that have their own agency, that cannot fully be controlled, and that behave in ways that we do not always like, then it proves hard to co-exist and tolerate nature’s autonomy. Nowhere is this more clearly visible than with the resurging wolf, whose (...)
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  • In Defense of Wild Night.Kimberly M. Dill - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (2):153-177.
    In this piece, I extend a transformative power account to the conservation of dark night skies. More specifically, I argue that the transformative power that dark nights bear warrants...
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  • Biophilia as an Environmental Virtue.David Clowney - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):999-1014.
    Beginning with E. O. Wilson’s notion of biophilia, our “innate tendency to focus on life and life-like processes,” I construct an environmental virtue with the same name that meets certain criteria an environmental virtue should meet. I argue that this virtue can have its status as a virtue by its contribution to human flourishing, while having care for live nature as its target, and care about live nature as its affective content. I explore its characteristics as both an individual and (...)
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  • For a Grounded Conception of Wilderness and More Wilderness on the Ground.Philip Cafaro - 2001 - Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):1-17.
    : Recently a number of influential academic environmentalists have spoken out against wilderness, most prominently William Cronon and J. Baird Callicott. This is odd, given that these writers seem to support two cornerstone positions of environmentalism as it has developed over the past twenty years: first, the view articulated within environmental ethics that wild, nonhuman nature, or at least some parts of it, has intrinsic or inherent value; second, the understanding developed within conservation biology that we have entered a period (...)
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  • Allen Carlson and Sheila Lintott (Eds): Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty. [REVIEW]Nathaniel Barrett - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (6):659-668.
    Allen Carlson and Sheila Lintott (eds): Nature, Aesthetics, and Environmentalism: From Beauty to Duty Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9258-2 Authors Nathaniel Barrett, Institute for the Biocultural Study of Religion 1711 Massachusetts Ave NW #308 Washington DC 20036 USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  • Biography of a "Feathered Pig": The California Condor Conservation Controversy. [REVIEW]Peter S. Alagona - 2004 - Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):557 - 583.
    In the early 20th century, after hundreds of years of gradual decline, the California condor emerged as an object of intensive scientific study, an important conservation target, and a cultural icon of the American wilderness preservation movement. Early condor researchers generally believed that the species' survival depended upon the preservation of its wilderness habitat. However, beginning in the 1970s, a new generation of scientists argued that no amount of wilderness could prevent the condor's decline and that only intensive scientific management (...)
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  • "Not Lawn, nor Pasture, nor Mead": Rewilding & the Cultural Landscape.Andrea R. Gammon - 2018 - Dissertation,
    This dissertation is based around conceptual conflicts introduced by the notion of rewilding and the challenges rewilding poses to place and cultural landscapes. Rewilding is a recent conservation strategy interested in the return of wilder, less human-managed environments. Often presented as an antidote to increasingly homogenized, organized, and managed environments, rewilding deliberately opens up space for the return of wild nature, typically by removing human elements that have obstructed or diminished its free reign or by reintroducing locally extinct species to (...)
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