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  1. ‘A commitment to Equality, Diversity and Inclusion’: a conceptual framework for equality of opportunity in Patient and Public Involvement in research.Sapfo Lignou, Mark Sheehan & Ilina Singh - 2024 - Research Ethics 20 (2):288-303.
    Many research institutions and funders have recently stated their commitment to actively support and promote ‘Equality, Diversity and Inclusion’ (EDI) in various aspects of health research including Patient and Public Involvement (PPI). However, translating this commitment into specific research projects presents significant challenges that existing approaches, practical guidelines and initiatives have not adequately addressed. In this paper, we explore how the lack of clear justifications for the EDI commitment in existing guidelines inadvertently complicates the work of those involved with PPI (...)
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  • Bots: Some Less-Considered Epistemic Problems.Benjamin Winokur - 2023 - Social Epistemology 37 (5):713-725.
    Posts on social media platforms like Twitter are sometimes the products of deceptively designed bots. These bots can cause obvious epistemic problems, such as tricking human users into believing the contents of misleading posts. However, less-considered epistemic problems involve false bot judgements where a human user mistakes another human user’s post for a bot-post, or where a human user mistakenly believes that bots are the primary vehicles for tokening certain content on social media. This paper takes up three questions concerning (...)
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  • Hermeneutical injustice: an exercise in conceptual precision.Blas Radi - 2022 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 66:97-100.
    In addition to opening a fertile field for inquiry in analytical social epistemology, Miranda Fricker’s work has provided powerful conceptual tools that merge descriptive capacity and political potency. For this reason, over the last fifteen years, the conceptual repertoire introduced by the author has been well received in both academic and political arenas. At times, the concepts of both testimonial and hermeneutical injustice acquire excessive dimensions in the literature, and this undermines, on the one hand, their analytical precision and, on (...)
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  • Knowing your past: Trauma, stress, and mnemonic epistemic injustice.Katherine Puddifoot & Clara Sandelind - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  • Automated opioid risk scores: a case for machine learning-induced epistemic injustice in healthcare.Giorgia Pozzi - 2023 - Ethics and Information Technology 25 (1):1-12.
    Artificial intelligence-based (AI) technologies such as machine learning (ML) systems are playing an increasingly relevant role in medicine and healthcare, bringing about novel ethical and epistemological issues that need to be timely addressed. Even though ethical questions connected to epistemic concerns have been at the center of the debate, it is going unnoticed how epistemic forms of injustice can be ML-induced, specifically in healthcare. I analyze the shortcomings of an ML system currently deployed in the USA to predict patients’ likelihood (...)
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  • Perpetuation as perpetration: Wrongful benefit and responsibility for historical injustice.Kristofer J. Petersen-Overton - 2022 - Contemporary Political Theory 21 (4):545-566.
    Do those of us living in the present have an obligation to rectify injustices committed by others in the distant past? This article is an attempt to revisit the problem of historical injustice by bringing together recent work on structural injustice in relation to the problem of wrongful benefit. The problem of benefitting from injustice, I argue, provides firmer grounds of obligation in forward-looking accounts of responsibility for historical injustice specifically. I argue (1) that if the negative effects of historical (...)
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  • Epistemic rights violations and epistemic injustice.Aidan McGlynn - 2023 - Asian Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):1-14.
    I offer a detailed discussion of the connections Lani Watson posits in her book The Right to Know between violations of a person’s epistemic rights on the one hand and the distinctively epistemic forms of injustice influentially discussed in the work of Miranda Fricker on the other. I argue that if we specify the content of the relevant epistemic rights (and the corresponding duties of others) carefully enough, it becomes plausible that there is an even tighter relationship between violations of (...)
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  • From Puzzle to Progress: How Engaging With Neurodiversity Can Improve Cognitive Science.Marie A. R. Manalili, Amy Pearson, Justin Sulik, Louise Creechan, Mahmoud Elsherif, Inika Murkumbi, Flavio Azevedo, Kathryn L. Bonnen, Judy S. Kim, Konrad Kording, Julie J. Lee, Manifold Obscura, Steven K. Kapp, Jan P. Röer & Talia Morstead - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (2):e13255.
    In cognitive science, there is a tacit norm that phenomena such as cultural variation or synaesthesia are worthy examples of cognitive diversity that contribute to a better understanding of cognition, but that other forms of cognitive diversity (e.g., autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder/ADHD, and dyslexia) are primarily interesting only as examples of deficit, dysfunction, or impairment. This status quo is dehumanizing and holds back much-needed research. In contrast, the neurodiversity paradigm argues that such experiences are not necessarily deficits but rather (...)
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  • Epistemic Injustice in Psychiatric Research and Practice.Ian James Kidd, Lucienne Spencer & Havi Carel - 2022 - Philosophical Psychology 1.
    This paper offers an overview of the philosophical work on epistemic injustices as it relates to psychiatry. After describing the development of epistemic injustice studies, we survey the existing literature on its application to psychiatry. We describe how the concept of epistemic injustice has been taken up into a range of debates in philosophy of psychiatry, including the nature of psychiatric conditions, psychiatric practices and research, and ameliorative projects. The final section of the paper indicates future directions for philosophical research (...)
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  • Epistemic (in)justice, social identity and the Black Box problem in patient care.Muneerah Khan & Cornelius Ewuoso - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-14.
    This manuscript draws on the moral norms arising from the nuanced accounts of epistemic (in)justice and social identity in relational autonomy to normatively assess and articulate the ethical problems associated with using AI in patient care in light of the Black Box problem. The article also describes how black-boxed AI may be used within the healthcare system. The manuscript highlights what needs to happen to align AI with the moral norms it draws on. Deeper thinking – from other backgrounds other (...)
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  • Embedding Justice Considerations in Climate Resilience.Jose Carlos Cañizares-Gaztelu, Samantha Copeland & Neelke Doorn - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment (1):63-88.
    This article contributes to recent work on justice in resilience-based projects for climate adaptation. At present, the model commonly used for guiding normative reflection in this domain is the tripartite model of justice, whereby justice is seen as comprising distributive, procedural and recognitional aspects. After discussing some conceptual problems and practical shortcomings of this model, we propose an alternative model with six forms of justice or kinds of justice demands: distributive, procedural, intergenerational, restorative and retributive justice, and justice in system (...)
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  • Epistemic injustice in Climate Adaptation.Morten Fibieger Byskov & Keith Hyams - 2022 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 25 (4):613-634.
    Indigenous peoples are disproportionally vulnerable to climate change. At the same time, they possess valuable knowledge for fair and sustainable climate adaptation planning and policymaking. Yet Indigenous peoples and knowledges are often excluded from or underrepresented within adaptation plans and policies. In this paper we ask whether the concept of epistemic injustice can be applied to the context of climate adaptation and the underrepresentation of Indigenous knowledges within adaptation policies and strategies. In recent years, the concept of epistemic injustice has (...)
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  • How the notion of epistemic injustice can mitigate polarization in a conversation about cultural, ethnic, and racial categorizations.Ingvill Bjørnstad Åberg - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 57 (4-5):983-1003.
    ABSTRACT It is a common contention that education done uncritically and unreflectively may serve to sustain and justify the status quo, in terms of mechanisms of cultural or racial privileging and marginalization. This article explores an argument made from within anti-oppressive education theory and advocated by theorist Kevin Kumashiro, namely that transformative education must entail altering harmful citational practices. I see two shortcomings in relation to this argument: first, its focus on discursive practice entails a prerequisite of high discursive literacy. (...)
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