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Jean Buridan’s Logic: The Treatise on Supposition The Treatise on Consequences

Dordrecht and Boston: Springer Science & Business Media (1985)

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  1. A Formal Reconstruction of Buridan's Modal Syllogism.Spencer Johnston - 2015 - History and Philosophy of Logic 36 (1):2-17.
    In this paper, we provide a historical exposition of John Buridan's theory of divided modal propositions. We then develop a semantic interpretation of Buridan's theory which pays particular attention to Buridan's ampliation of modal terms. We show that these semantics correctly capture his syllogistic reasoning.
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  • Every Word is a Name: Autonymy and Quotation in Augustine.Tamer Nawar - 2021 - Mind 130 (518):595-616.
    Augustine famously claims every word is a name. Some readers take Augustine to thereby maintain a purely referentialist semantic account according to which every word is a referential expression whose meaning is its extension. Other readers think that Augustine is no referentialist and is merely claiming that every word has some meaning. In this paper, I clarify Augustine’s arguments to the effect that every word is a name and argue that ‘every word is a name’ amounts to the claim that (...)
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  • The Doctrine of Distribution.Terence Parsons - 2006 - History and Philosophy of Logic 27 (1):59-74.
    Peter Geach describes the 'doctrine of distribution' as the view that a term is distributed if it refers to everything that it denotes, and undistributed if it refers to only some of the things that it denotes. He argues that the notion, so explained, is incoherent. He claims that the doctrine of distribution originates from a degenerate use of the notion of ?distributive supposition? in medieval supposition theory sometime in the 16th century. This paper proposes instead that the doctrine of (...)
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  • Syncategoremata in Arabic Logic, Al-Fārābī and Avicenna.Saloua Chatti - 2014 - History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (2):167-197.
    In this paper, I raise the following problem: What terms are considered as syncategoremata in the Arabic logical texts? How are they defined? How do they determine the forms of the propositions and the inferences? To answer these questions, I focus on the analyses provided by al-Fārābī and Avicenna. Both authors apply the grammatical distinction between the particle, the noun and the verb to logic. They also state the semantic and the syntactic criterions, but their analyses of the particles are (...)
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  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 2004 - History and Philosophy of Logic 25 (2):153-164.
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  • Ockham and Buridan on the Ampliation of Modal Propositions.Spencer Johnston - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):234-255.
    This paper explores a currently unnoticed argument used by John Buridan to defend his analysis of modal propositions and to reject the analysis of modal propositions of necessity put forward by William of Ockham. First, I explore this argument and, by considering possible responses of Ockham to Buridan, show some of the ways in which Ockham seems to be keeping closer to Aristotle's remarks about modal propositions in Prior Analytics, 18.
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  • La Philosophie au Xive Siècle.Claude Panaccio - 1992 - Dialogue 31 (3):363-.
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