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  1. The Need for Philosophy in Promoting Democracy: A Case for Philosophy in the Curriculum.Gilbert Burgh - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):38-58.
    The studies by Trickey and Topping, which provide empirical support that philosophy produces cognitive gains and social benefits, have been used to advocate the view that philosophy deserves a place in the curriculum. Arguably, the existing curriculum, built around well-established core subjects, already provides what philosophy is said to do, and, therefore, there is no case to be made for expanding it to include philosophy. However, if we take citizenship education seriously, then the development of active and informed citizens requires (...)
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  • Playing with Your Self: A Philosophical Exploration of Attitudes and Identities in Games.Liam Miller - unknown
  • Adaptive Demarchy: A Flexible Model of Deliberative Democracy for an Uncertain Political Context.Luke Benjamin Scott Zaphir - 2017 - Dissertation, The University of Queensland
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  • ‘Do Not Block the Way of Inquiry’: Cultivating Collective Doubt Through Sustained Deep Reflective Thinking.Gilbert Burgh, Simone Thornton & Liz Fynes-Clinton - 2018 - In Ellen Duthie, Félix García Moriyón & Rafael Robles Loro (eds.), Parecidos de familia. Propuestas actuales en Filosofía para Niños / Family Resemblances: Current trends in philosophy for children. Madrid, Spain: pp. 47-61.
    We provide a Camusian/Peircean notion of inquiry that emphasises an attitude of fallibilism and sustained epistemic dissonance as a conceptual framework for a theory of classroom practice founded on Deep Reflective Thinking (DTR), in which the cultivation of collective doubt, reflective evaluation and how these relate to the phenomenological aspects of inquiry are central to communities of inquiry. In a study by Fynes-Clinton, preliminary evidence demonstrates that if students engage in DRT, they more frequently experience cognitive dissonance and as a (...)
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  • The Narrow-Sense and Wide-Sense Community of Inquiry: What It Means for Teachers.Gilbert Burgh - 2021 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 41 (1):12-26.
    In this paper, I introduce the narrow-sense and wide-sense conceptions of the community of inquiry (Sprod, 2001) as a way of understanding what is meant by the phrase ‘converting the classroom into a community of inquiry.’ The wide-sense conception is the organising or regulative principle of scholarly communities of inquiry and a classroom-wide ideal for the reconstruction of education. I argue that converting the classroom into a community of inquiry requires more than following a specific procedural method, and, therefore, that (...)
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  • Disruptive Philosophies: Eco-Rational Education and the Epistemology of Place ​​​​​​​.Simone Gralton Thornton - 2019 - Dissertation, The University of Queensland
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  • Collaborative Philosophical Inquiry as Peace Pedagogy.Somayeh Khatibi Moghadam - 2019 - Dissertation, The University of Queensland
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  • Deep Reflective Thinking Through Collaborative Philosophical Inquiry.Elizabeth Jean Fynes-Clinton - 2018 - Dissertation, The University of Queensland
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  • The Educational Cost of Philosophical Suicide: What It Means to Be Lucid.Simone Thornton - 2019 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (6):608-618.
    The struggle to become lucid is at the heart of The Myth of Sisyphus. To understand the absurd is to understand that the fit between our conception of the world and the world itself is fraught with uncertainty; lucidity is the elucidation of the absurd. To be lucid is to revolt against the type of certainty that leads to suffering; to revolt against philosophical suicide. Camus teaches us the intellectual humility that stays hands; there is no reasoning that justifies suffering. (...)
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