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  1. Disconnectedness From the Here-and-Now: A Phenomenological Perspective as a Counteract on the Medicalisation of Death Wishes in Elderly People.Els van Wijngaarden, Carlo Leget & Anne Goossensen - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (2):265-273.
    When elderly people are ideating on manners to end their lives, because they feel life is over and no longer worth living, it is important to understand their lived experiences, thoughts and behaviour in order to appropriately align care, support and policy to the needs of these people. In the literature, the wish to die in elderly people is often understood from a medical, psychopathological paradigm, referred to as cognitive impairment, depressive disorder, pathological bereavement, and suicidality. In this paper, we (...)
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  • Factors Associated with the Rejection of Active Euthanasia: A Survey Among the General Public in Austria. [REVIEW]Willibald Stronegger, Nathalie Burkert, Franziska Grossschädl & Wolfgang Freidl - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):26.
    In recent decades, the general public has become increasingly receptive toward a legislation that allows active voluntary euthanasia. The purpose of this study was to survey the current attitude towards AVE within the Austrian population and to identify explanatory factors in the areas of socio-demographics, personal experiences with care, and ideological orientation. A further objective was to examine differences depending on the type of problem formulation for the purpose of measuring attitude.
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  • Attitudes Towards Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia Among Care-Dependent Older Adults (50+) in Austria: The Role of Socio-Demographics, Religiosity, Physical Illness, Psychological Distress, and Social Isolation.Erwin Stolz, Hannes Mayerl, Peter Gasser-Steiner & Wolfgang Freidl - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):1-13.
    Background Care-dependency constitutes an important issue with regard to the approval of end-of-life decisions, yet attitudes towards assisted suicide and euthanasia are understudied among care-dependent older adults. We assessed attitudes towards assisted suicide and euthanasia and tested empirical correlates, including socio-demographics, religiosity, physical illness, psychological distress and social isolation. Methods A nationwide cross-sectional survey among older care allowance recipients in private households in Austria was conducted in 2016. In computer-assisted personal interviews, 493 respondents were asked whether or not they approved (...)
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  • Attitudes Towards End-of-Life Decisions in Case of Long-Term Care Dependency: A Survey Among the Older Population in Austria.Erwin Stolz, Hannes Mayerl, Anja Waxenegger, Éva Rásky & Wolfgang Freidl - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (6):413-416.
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  • Assistance in Dying for Older People Without a Serious Medical Condition Who Have a Wish to Die: A National Cross-Sectional Survey.Natasja J. H. Raijmakers, Agnes van der Heide, Pauline S. C. Kouwenhoven, Ghislaine J. M. W. van Thiel, Johannes J. M. van Delden & Judith A. C. Rietjens - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):145-150.
  • Trust Increases Euthanasia Acceptance: A Multilevel Analysis Using the European Values Study.Vanessa Köneke - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):86.
    This study tests how various kinds of trust impact attitudes toward euthanasia among the general public. The indication that trust might have an impact on euthanasia attitudes is based on the slippery slope argument, which asserts that allowing euthanasia might lead to abuses and involuntary deaths. Adopting this argument usually leads to less positive attitudes towards euthanasia. Tying in with this, it is assumed here that greater trust diminishes such slippery slope fears, and thereby increases euthanasia acceptance.
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  • From Reciprocity to Autonomy in Physician-Assisted Death: An Ethical Analysis of the Dutch Supreme Court Ruling in the Albert Heringa Case.Barend W. Florijn - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (2):51-58.
    In 2002, the Dutch Euthanasia Act was put in place to regulate the ending of one’s life, permitting a physician to provide assistance in dying to a patient whose suffering the physician assesses as...
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