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  1. The ‘Court of Public Opinion:’ Public Perceptions of Business Involvement in Human Rights Violations.Matthew Amengual, Rita Mota & Alexander Rustler - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-26.
    Public pressure is essential for providing multinational enterprises with motivation to follow the standards of human rights conduct set in soft-law instruments, such as the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. But how does the public judge MNE involvement in human rights violations? We empirically answer this question drawing on an original survey of American adults. We asked respondents to judge over 12,000 randomly generated scenarios in which MNEs may be considered to have been involved in human (...)
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  • Extracting Legitimacy: An Analysis of Corporate Responses to Accusations of Human Rights Abuses.Rajiv Maher, Moritz Neumann & Mette Slot Lykke - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (4):609-628.
    We ask what type of neutralization techniques corporations apply to allegations of human rights abuses. We proceed by undertaking a Qualitative Content Analysis of 162 responses by ten extractives-sector firms over a period of 14 years. The firms were responding to accusations of human rights impacts documented by the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre. We use Garrett et al.’s :507–520, 1989) framework of neutralization techniques consisting of denial, justification, concession and excuse to examine the responses. During our QCA, we (...)
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  • The Social License to Operate.Geert Demuijnck & Björn Fasterling - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):675-685.
    This article proposes a way to zoom in on the concept of the social license to operate from the broader normative perspective of contractarianism. An SLO can be defined as a contractarian basis for the legitimacy of a company’s specific activity or project. “SLO”, as a fashionable expression, has its origins in business practice. From a normative viewpoint, the concept is closely related to social contract theory, and, as such, it has a political dimension. After outlining the contractarian normative background (...)
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  • CEO Letters: Social License to Operate and Community Involvement in the Mining Industry.Blanca de-Miguel-Molina, Vicente Chirivella-González & Beatriz García-Ortega - forthcoming - Business Ethics: A European Review.
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