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  1. Better in Theory Than in Practise? Challenges When Applying the Luck Egalitarian Ethos in Health Care Policy.Joar Björk, Gert Helgesson & Niklas Juth - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (4):735-742.
    Luck egalitarianism, a theory of distributive justice, holds that inequalities which arise due to individuals’ imprudent choices must not, as a matter of justice, be neutralized. This article deals with the possible application of luck egalitarianism to the area of health care. It seeks to investigate whether the ethos of luck egalitarianism can be operationalized to the point of informing health care policy without straying from its own ideals. In the transition from theory to practise, luck egalitarianism encounters several difficulties. (...)
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  • Collective Forward-Looking Responsibility of Patient Advocacy Organizations: Conceptual and Ethical Analysis.Sabine Salloch, Christoph Rach & Regina Müller - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundPatient advocacy organizations have an increasing influence on health policy and biomedical research, therefore, questions about the specific character of their responsibility arise: Can PAOs bear moral responsibility and, if so, to whom are they responsible, for what and on which normative basis? Although the concept of responsibility in healthcare is strongly discussed, PAOs particularly have rarely been systematically analyzed as morally responsible agents. The aim of the current paper is to analyze the character of PAOs’ responsibility to provide guidance (...)
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  • On the Person in Personal Health Responsibility.Joar Røkke Fystro, Bjørn Hofmann & Eli Feiring - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-7.
    In this paper, we start by comparing the two agents, Ann and Bob, who are involved in two car crashes. Whereas Ann crashes her car through no fault of her own, Bob crashes as a result of reckless driving. Unlike Ann, Bob is held criminally responsible, and the insurance company refuses to cover the car’s damages. Nonetheless, Ann and Bob both receive emergency hospital treatment that a third party covers, regardless of any assessment of personal responsibility. What warrants such apparent (...)
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  • Personal Responsibility for Health: Exploring Together with Lay Persons.Yukiko Asada, Marion Brown, Mary McNally, Andrea Murphy, Robin Urquhart & Grace Warner - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics.
    Emerging parallel to long-standing, academic and policy inquiries on personal responsibility for health is the empirical assessment of lay persons’ views. Yet, previous studies rarely explored personal responsibility for health among lay persons as dynamic societal values. We sought to explore lay persons’ views on personal responsibility for health using the Fairness Dialogues, a method for lay persons to deliberate equity issues in health and health care through a small group dialogue using a hypothetical scenario. We conducted two 2-h Fairness (...)
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  • Ethics in Emergency Times: The Case of COVID-19.Stefano Semplici - 2022 - Philosophies 7 (3):70.
    A disaster is an occurrence disrupting a community’s normal functioning and existence. The disruption may render it impossible to comply with principles and to respect, protect, and fulfill rights as it happens in ordinary times; it may induce an overwhelming shortage of resources and make tragic decisions unavoidable. From its very beginning, the COVID-19 pandemic evoked the scenario of disaster medicine, where triage is likely to imply not simply postponing a treatment but letting someone die. However, it is not only (...)
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  • Integrating Supported Decision-Making Into the Clinical Research Process.Michael Ashley Stein, Benjamin C. Silverman, David H. Strauss, Willyanne DeCormier Plosky, Ari Ne’Eman & Barbara E. Bierer - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (11):32-35.
    Peterson, Karlawish, and Largent’s “Supported Decision Making with People at the Margins of Autonomy” brings welcome attention to the rights of people with cognitive impairment and provides...
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  • Responsibility and the Recursion Problem.Ben Davies - 2022 - Ratio 35 (2):112-122.
    A considerable literature has emerged around the idea of using ‘personal responsibility’ as an allocation criterion in healthcare distribution, where a person's being suitably responsible for their health needs may justify additional conditions on receiving healthcare, and perhaps even limiting access entirely, sometimes known as ‘responsibilisation’. This discussion focuses most prominently, but not exclusively, on ‘luck egalitarianism’, the view that deviations from equality are justified only by suitably free choices. A superficially separate issue in distributive justice concerns the two–way relationship (...)
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  • Healthcare Decisions Are Always Supported Decisions.Gavin G. Enck - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (11):29-32.
    Peterson, Karlawish, and Largent’s “Supported Decision Making with People at the Margins of Autonomy” not only elucidates the conceptual framework but also the practical importance of suppor...
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  • Supported Decision Making with People at the Margins of Autonomy: Response to Commentaries.Emily A. Largent, Jason Karlawish & Andrew Peterson - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (1):W1-W4.
    Supported decision making is a model of decision making in which an adult with impaired capacity enters freely into an agreement with a closely trusted person or persons (the “s...
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  • Healthcare, Responsibility and Golden Opportunities.Gabriel De Marco, Thomas Douglas & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (3).
    When it comes to determining how healthcare resources should be allocated, there are many factors that could—and perhaps should—be taken into account. One such factor is a patient’s responsibility for his or her illness, or for the behavior that caused it. Policies that take responsibility for the unhealthy lifestyle or its outcomes into account—responsibility-sensitive policies—have faced a series of criticisms. One holds that agents often fail to meet either the control or epistemic conditions on responsibility with regard to their unhealthy (...)
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  • Sustainability Principle for the Ethics of Healthcare Resource Allocation.Christian Munthe, Davide Fumagalli & Erik Malmqvist - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (2):90-97.
    We propose a principle of sustainability to complement established principles used for justifying healthcare resource allocation. We argue that the application of established principles of equal treatment, need, prognosis and cost-effectiveness gives rise to what we call negative dynamics: a gradual depletion of the value possible to generate through healthcare. These principles should therefore be complemented by a sustainability principle, making the prospect of negative dynamics a further factor to consider, and possibly outweigh considerations highlighted by the other principles. We (...)
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  • Responsibility for Health.John McMillan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):627-628.
    The question of whether any of us can truly be held responsible for what we do is an issue that occupied the ancient Greeks and continues to entertain our leading thinkers. Whether we can be held responsible for our health, or lack thereof, has additional layers of complexity because of the way in which what we do over time impacts our health. Those of us who have ever self-deceptively wondered about the apparent shrinking of our belt or at the fact (...)
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  • Personal Responsibility for Health: Conceptual Clarity, and Fairness in Policy and Practice.Harald Schmidt - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):648-649.
    Rebecca Brown and Julian Savulescu1 focus on individuals’ responsibility regarding health-related behaviours. They rightly argue that paying attention to diachronic and dyadic aspects of responsibility can further illuminate the highly multifaceted concept of personal responsibility for health. Their point of departure is a pragmatic one. They note that personal responsibility ‘is highly intuitive, [that] responsibility practices are a commonplace feature of almost all areas of human life and interpersonal relationship [and that] the pervasiveness of this concept [suggest] the improbability of (...)
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