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  1. Return of Genetic Research Results to Participants and Families: IRB Perspectives and Roles.Laura M. Beskow & P. Pearl O'Rourke - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):502-513.
    We surveyed IRB chairs' perspectives on offering individual genetic research results to participants and families, including family members of deceased participants, and the IRB's role in addressing these issues. Given a particular hypothetical scenario, respondents favored offering results to participants but not family members, giving choices at the time of initial consent, and honoring elicited choices. They felt IRBs should have authority regarding the process issues, but a more limited role in medical and scientific issues.
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  • Returning a Research Participant's Genomic Results to Relatives: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Rebecca Branum, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):440-463.
    Genomic research results and incidental findings with health implications for a research participant are of potential interest not only to the participant, but also to the participant's family. Yet investigators lack guidance on return of results to relatives, including after the participant's death. In this paper, a national working group offers consensus analysis and recommendations, including an ethical framework to guide investigators in managing this challenging issue, before and after the participant's death.
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  • Pragmatic Tools for Sharing Genomic Research Results with the Relatives of Living and Deceased Research Participants.Susan M. Wolf, Emily Scholtes, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):87-109.
    Returning genomic research results to family members raises complex questions. Genomic research on life-limiting conditions such as cancer, and research involving storage and reanalysis of data and specimens long into the future, makes these questions pressing. This author group, funded by an NIH grant, published consensus recommendations presenting a framework. This follow-up paper offers concrete guidance and tools for implementation. The group collected and analyzed relevant documents and guidance, including tools from the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium. The authors then (...)
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  • Should Researchers Offer Results to Family Members of Cancer Biobank Participants? A Mixed-Methods Study of Proband and Family Preferences.Deborah R. Gordon, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Marguerite Robinson, Wesley O. Petersen, Jason S. Egginton, Kari G. Chaffee, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan M. Wolf & Barbara A. Koenig - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (1):1-22.
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  • Health Data Research on Sudden Cardiac Arrest: Perspectives of Survivors and Their Next-of-Kin.Dick L. Willems, Hanno L. Tan, Marieke T. Blom, Rens Veeken & Marieke A. R. Bak - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-15.
    BackgroundConsent for data research in acute and critical care is complex as patients become at least temporarily incapacitated or die. Existing guidelines and regulations in the European Union are of limited help and there is a lack of literature about the use of data from this vulnerable group. To aid the creation of a patient-centred framework for responsible data research in the acute setting, we explored views of patients and next-of-kin about the collection, storage, sharing and use of genetic and (...)
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