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  1. Breaking the Cycle of Marginalization: How to Involve Local Communities in Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives?Manon Eikelenboom & Thomas B. Long - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    While the benefits of including local communities in multi-stakeholder initiatives have been acknowledged, their successful involvement remains a challenging process. Research has shown that large business interests are regularly over-represented and that local communities remain marginalized in the process. Additionally, little is known about how procedural fairness and inclusion can be managed and maintained during multi-stakeholder initiatives. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate how marginalized stakeholders, and local communities in particular, can be successfully involved during the course (...)
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  • Multiparty Alliances and Systemic Change: The Role of Beneficiaries and Their Capacity for Collective Action.Diana Trujillo - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):425-449.
    The intensification of cross-sector collaboration phenomena has occurred in multiple fields of action. Organizations in the private, public, and social sectors are working together to tackle society’s most wicked problems. Some success has resulted in a generalized belief that cross-sector collaborations represent the new paradigm to manage complex problems. Yet, important knowledge gaps remain about how cross-sector alliances generate value for society, particularly to its beneficiaries. This paper answers the question: How cross-sector collaborations lead to systemic change? It uses a (...)
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  • The Political Ontology of Corporate Social Responsibility: Obscuring the Pluriverse in Place.Maria Ehrnström-Fuentes & Steffen Böhm - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    This article examines corporate social responsibility through the lens of political ontology. We contend that CSR is not only a discursive mean of legitimization but an inherently ontological practice through which particular worlds become real. CSR enables the politics of place-making, connecting humans and nonhumans in specific territorial configurations in accordance with corporate needs and interests. We discuss three CSR mechanisms of singularization that create a particular corporate ontology in place: community engagements that form ‘stakeholders’; CSR standards and certifications that (...)
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  • “It’s Us, You Know, There’s a Feeling of Community”: Exploring Notions of Community in a Consumer Co-Operative.Victoria Wells, Nick Ellis, Richard Slack & Mona Moufahim - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (3):617-635.
    The notion of community infers unity and a source of moral obligations in an organisational ethic between individuals or groups. As such, a community, having a strong sense of collective identity, may foster collective action to promote social change for the betterment of society. This research critically explores notions of community through analysing discursive identity construction practices within a member-owned urban consumer co-operative public house in the UK. A strong sense of community is an often-claimed CC characteristic. The paper’s main (...)
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  • Stakeholder Engagement, Knowledge Problems and Ethical Challenges.J. Robert Mitchell, Ronald K. Mitchell, Richard A. Hunt, David M. Townsend & Jae H. Lee - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (1):75-94.
    In the management and business ethics literatures, stakeholder engagement has been demonstrated to lead to more ethical management practices. However, there may be limits on the extent to which stakeholder engagement can, as currently conceptualized, resolve some of the more difficult ethical challenges faced by managers. In this paper we argue that stakeholder engagement, when seen as a way of reducing five types of knowledge problems—risk, ambiguity, complexity, equivocality, and a priori irreducible uncertainty—can aid managers in resolving such ethical challenges. (...)
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  • Philanthropy and the Making of a New Moral Order: A History of Developing Community.Arun Kumar - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (4):729-741.
    Community development, or the socio-economic transformation of local communities, has been a significant focus of organizational ethics. Such community development programmes—whether led by state, civil society, or businesses—are animated by modernization and have involved, I argue, the production of a new moral order. As part of which, communities were imagined in particular ways, historically. Drawing on a periodization of history of philanthropy of the Tata Group from the 1860s onwards, I outline the four stages involved in the production of this (...)
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  • Stakeholder Engagement Through Empowerment: The Case of Coffee Farmers.Chiara Civera, Simone de Colle & Cecilia Casalegno - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (2):156-174.
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  • Cross-Sector Social Interactions and Systemic Change in Disaster Response: A Qualitative Study.Anne M. Quarshie & Rudolf Leuschner - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):357-384.
    The United States National Preparedness System has evolved significantly in the recent past. These changes have affected the system structures and goals for disaster response. At the same time, actors such as private businesses have become increasingly involved in disaster efforts. In this paper, we begin to fill the gap in the cross-sector literature regarding interactions that have systemic impacts by investigating how the simultaneous processes of systemic change and intensifying cross-sector interaction worked and interacted in the context of the (...)
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  • The Social License to Operate.Geert Demuijnck & Björn Fasterling - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):675-685.
    This article proposes a way to zoom in on the concept of the social license to operate from the broader normative perspective of contractarianism. An SLO can be defined as a contractarian basis for the legitimacy of a company’s specific activity or project. “SLO”, as a fashionable expression, has its origins in business practice. From a normative viewpoint, the concept is closely related to social contract theory, and, as such, it has a political dimension. After outlining the contractarian normative background (...)
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  • Community Religion, Employees, and the Social License to Operate.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):775-807.
    The World Bank recently noted: “Social license to operate has traditionally referred to the conduct of firms with regard to the impact on local communities and the environment, but the definition has expanded in recent years to include issues related to worker and human rights”. In this paper, we examine a factor that can influence the kind of work conditions that can facilitate or obstruct a firm’s attempts to achieve the social license to operate. Specifically, we examine the empirical association (...)
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  • Stakeholder Relationships, Engagement, and Sustainability Reporting.Irene M. Herremans, Jamal A. Nazari & Fereshteh Mahmoudian - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (3):417-435.
    The concept of sustainability was developed in response to stakeholder demands. One of the key mechanisms for engaging stakeholders is sustainability disclosure, often in the form of a report. Yet, how reporting is used to engage stakeholders is understudied. Using resource dependence and stakeholder theories, we investigate how companies within the same industry address different dependencies on stakeholders for economic, natural environment, and social resources and thus engage stakeholders accordingly. To achieve this objective, we conducted our research using qualitative research (...)
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  • Squeezing Psychological Freedom in Corporate–Community Engagement.Rajiv Maher - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (4):1047-1066.
    This article analyses the ethics of how community engagement and dialogue as applied by a mining corporation in Chile led to erosion of the community’s psychological freedom despite being aligned with best practice. This article details how a mining company squeezed the psychological freedom of the community in order to obtain an agreement between the period of 2000 and 2016. The findings focus particularly on a 9-month period between 2015 and 2016 when the company undertook intense community engagement. The article (...)
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  • Towards Understanding Stakeholder Salience Transition and Relational Approach to ‘Better’ Corporate Social Responsibility: A Case for a Proposed Model in Practice.Michael O. Erdiaw-Kwasie, Khorshed Alam & Md Shahiduzzaman - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (1):85-101.
    Management and business literature affirm the role played by stakeholders in corporate social responsibility practices as crucial, but what constitutes a true business–society partnership remains relatively unexplored. This paper aims to improve scholarly and management understanding beyond the usual managers’ perceptions on salience attributes, to include how stakeholders can acquire missing attributes to inform a meaningful partnership. In doing this, a model is proposed which conceptualises CSR practices and outcomes within the frameworks of stakeholder salience via empowerment, sustainable corporate social (...)
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  • Multi-Stakeholder Partnerships for Sustainability: Designing Decision-Making Processes for Partnership Capacity.Adriane MacDonald, Amelia Clarke & Lei Huang - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (2):409-426.
    To address the prevalence and complexities of sustainable development challenges around the world, organizations in the business, government, and non-profit sectors are increasingly collaborating via multi-stakeholder partnerships. Because complex problems can be neither understood nor addressed by a single organization, it is necessary to bring together the knowledge and resources of many stakeholders. Yet, how these partnerships coordinate their collaborative activities to achieve mutual and organization-specific goals is not well understood. This study takes an organization design perspective of collaborative decision-making (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and Dehumanization.Gareth Craze - 2019 - Philosophy of Management 18 (1):43-53.
    Corporate social responsibility is widely viewed as an important feature of contemporary business. It is characterized by the notion that organizations ought to voluntarily recognize and, where possible, practically mitigate the social impacts of its business activities, and that doing so allows organizations to meet the expectations of affected stakeholders. However, CSR initiatives are almost universally tethered to the idea that corporations exist to serve their own performance objectives, and that these will ultimately take precedence over wider macro-social considerations. The (...)
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  • Do Stakeholder Orientation and Environmental Proactivity Impact Firm Profitability?Franck Brulhart, Sandrine Gherra & Bertrand V. Quelin - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (1):25-46.
    The impact of socially responsible corporate behavior on economic performance is a major preoccupation of managers today. This article explores the links between narrowly defined constructs: stakeholder orientation, environmental proactivity and profitability, from the perspectives of stakeholder theory and resource-based theory. We collected data on the food and beverage, and household and personal products industries. Using structural equation modeling, this paper makes two contributions. We found a negative link between companies simply having a higher stakeholder orientation and profitability. Importantly, however, (...)
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  • The Meaning of Corporate Social Responsibility: The Vision of Four Nations. [REVIEW]Ina Freeman & Amir Hasnaoui - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (3):419 - 443.
    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has existed in name for over 70 years. It is practiced in many countries and it is studied in academia around the world. However, CSR is not a universally adopted concept as it is understood differentially despite increasing pressures for its incorporation into business practices. This lack of a clear definition is complicated by the use of ambiguous terms in the proffered definitions and disputes as to where corporate governance is best addressed by many of the (...)
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  • Battling the Devolution in the Research on Corporate Philanthropy.Kellie Liket & Ana Simaens - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (2):1-24.
    The conceptual literature increasingly portrays corporate philanthropy (CP) as an old-fashioned and ineffective operationalization of a firm’s corporate social responsibility. In contrast, empirical research indicates that corporations of all sizes, and both in developed and emerging economies, actively practice CP. This disadvantaged status of the concept, and research, on CP, complicates the advancement of our knowledge about the topic. In a systematic review of the literature containing 122 journal articles on CP, we show that this business practice is loaded with (...)
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  • A Global Mining Corporation and Local Communities in the Lake Victoria Zone: The Case of Barrick Gold Multinational in Tanzania. [REVIEW]Aloysius Marcus Newenham-Kahindi - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):253 - 282.
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  • Different Drivers: Exploring Employee Involvement in Corporate Philanthropy.Beth Breeze & Pamala Wiepking - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (3):453-467.
    Corporate Philanthropy is multi-dimensional, differs between sectors and involves both individual and organisational decision-making to achieve business and social goals. However, the CP literature characteristically focuses on strategic decisions made by business leaders and ignores the role of employees, especially those in lower status and lower paid positions. To redress this imbalance, we conducted a qualitative study of employees’ involvement in CP processes in ten workplaces in the South East of England to identify whether and how they are involved in (...)
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  • The Impact of Cause Portfolio Focus and Contribution Amount on Stakeholder Evaluations.Stefanie Robinson & Meike Eilert - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (7):1483-1514.
    When companies engage in corporate philanthropy, they can donate to a number of causes supporting a variety of issues, thus establishing cause portfolios. This research examines how the focus of a cause portfolio affects company evaluations. Results from an experiment show that when a company donates a small amount of money, consumers have lower evaluations of a company when the cause portfolio is focused versus diverse. This is because the focused portfolio is perceived to have a weaker impact to society. (...)
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  • Christian Religiosity and Corporate Community Involvement.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (1):85-125.
    ABSTRACT:We examine whether religion influences company decisions related to corporate community involvement. Employing a large US sample, we show that the CCI initiatives of a company are positively associated with the level of Christian religiosity present in the region within which that company’s headquarters is located. This association persists even after we control for a wide range of firm characteristics and after we subject our results to several econometric tests. These results support our religious morality hypothesis which holds that companies (...)
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  • Harnessing Wicked Problems in Multi-Stakeholder Partnerships.Domenico Dentoni, Verena Bitzer & Greetje Schouten - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):333-356.
    Despite the burgeoning literature on the governance and impact of cross-sector partnerships in the past two decades, the debate on how and when these collaborative arrangements address globally relevant problems and contribute to systemic change remains open. Building upon the notion of wicked problems and the literature on governing such wicked problems, this paper defines harnessing problems in multi-stakeholder partnerships as the approach of taking into account the nature of the problem and of organizing governance processes accordingly. The paper develops (...)
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  • The Power of One to Make a Difference: How Informal and Formal CEO Power Affect Environmental Sustainability.Judith L. Walls & Pascual Berrone - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (2):293-308.
    We theoretically discuss and empirically show how CEO power based on environmental expertise and formal influence over executives and directors, in the absence and presence of shareholder activism, spurs firms toward greener strategies. Our results support the idea that CEOs with informal power, grounded in expertise, reduce corporate environmental impact and this relationship is amplified when the CEO also enjoys formal power over the board of directors. Additionally, we found that any source of CEO power, whether informal or formal, is (...)
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  • Engaging Stakeholders in Emerging Economies: The Case of Multilatinas.Anabella Davila, Carlos Rodriguez-Lluesma & Marta M. Elvira - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (4):949-964.
    Stakeholder engagement is central to organizations’ social impact. Engagement activities rely on mechanisms whose complexity increases for multinational corporations. This study explores the boundary conditions of our Western/Northern-based knowledge of stakeholder engagement mechanisms through the examination of such practices in multinational companies founded in Latin America. Based on previous studies on the identification of organizational stakeholders in the region, we aim to understand the specific engagement mechanisms MLs use. To this end, we analyze qualitatively 28 corporate sustainability reports by relevant (...)
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