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  1. Narrative Reflection in the Philosophy of Teaching: Genealogies and Portraits.Hunter Mcewan - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (1):125-140.
    How has philosophical reflection contributed to the ways that we think about teaching? In this paper I explore two forms of narrative reflection on teaching—genealogies and portraits. Genealogies tell a story about the origins of teaching; portraits find expression in myths and other narrative forms. I explore two genealogies of teaching—one deriving from the sophist, Protagoras, in which teaching is viewed as a technical skill employing methods of instruction; the other, deriving from Plato, in which teaching is seen fundamentally in (...)
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  • A Persian Marriage Feast in Macedon?Thomas Harrison - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):507-514.
    Herodotus’ fateful tale of the seven Persian emissaries sent to seek Earth and Water from the Macedonian king Amyntes has been the subject of increasingly rich discussion in recent years. Generations of commentators have cumulatively revealed the ironies of Herodotus’ account: its repeated hints, for example, of the Persians’ eventual end; and, crowning all other ironies, the story's ending: that, after resisting the indignity of his female relatives being molested at a banquet, and disposing of all trace of the Persian (...)
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  • Elenchos y Eros: el caso de Sócrates y Agatón en SMP. 199C-201A.María Angélica Fierro - 2015 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 14:93-108.
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  • Eros and Philia in Platonic Philosophy.Maria Aparecida de Paiva Montenegro - 2014 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 13:121-129.
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  • Plato on Friendship and Eros.C. D. C. Reeve - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • Homosexuality.Brent Pickett - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • A Queer Feeling for Plato: Corporeal Affects, Philosophical Hermeneutics, and Queer Receptions.Emanuela Bianchi - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):139-162.
    This paper takes Plato's metaphor of poetic transmission as magnetic charge in the Ion as a central trope for thinking through the various relationships between philosophy and literature; between poetry, interpretation, and truth; and between erotic affects and the material, corporeal, queer dimensions of reception. The affective dimensions of the Platonic text in the Ion, Republic, Symposium, and Phaedrus are examined at length, and the explicit accounts of ascent to philosophical truth are shown to be complicated by the persistence of (...)
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  • Comic Sex and ‘Fragmentary Thinking’: Damoxenus, Fr. 3 Pcg.Matthew Wright - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-11.
    Our extant texts never give a fully comprehensive or representative impression of classical literature. Fragments are valuable because they tell—or hint at—a different story. They represent vestigial traces of a counterfactual alternative version of literary history, and they offer tantalizing glimpses of voices or varieties of human experience that were excluded from the classical canon. To ‘think fragmentarily’ is to think beyond the canon and to question traditionally dominant modes of thought. This article uses a neglected fragment of Damoxenus as (...)
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  • Gender, Class and Ideology: The Social Function of Virgin Sacrifice in Euripides' Children of Herakles.David Kawalko Roselli - 2007 - Classical Antiquity 26 (1):81-169.
    This paper explores how gender can operate as a disguise for class in an examination of the self-sacrifice of the Maiden in Euripides' Children of Herakles. In Part I, I discuss the role of human sacrifice in terms of its radical potential to transform society and the role of class struggle in Athens. In Part II, I argue that the representation of women was intimately connected with the social and political life of the polis. In a discussion of iconography, the (...)
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  • Six Greek Verbs of Sexual Congress.David Bain - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (01):51-.
    There existed in Greek a multitude of words denoting or connoting sexual congress. The list of verbs given by Pollux only skims the surface. In what follows I discuss words which with one exception are absent from this list and belong, as will be seen from their distribution, to the lower register of the Greek language. They are all demonstrably direct expressions, blunt and non-euphemistic. Only one of them, κιν, is at all common in non-sexual contexts. As for the rest, (...)
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  • The Sounds of Silence: Rhetoric and Dialectic in the Refutation of Callicles in Plato's Gorgias.Rod Jenks - 2007 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 40 (2):201-215.
  • Aristophanes' Adôniazousai.L. Reitzammer - 2008 - Classical Antiquity 27 (2):282-333.
    A scholiast's note on Lysistrata mentions that there was an alternative title to the play: Adôniazousai. A close reading of the play with this title in mind reveals that Lysistrata and her allies metaphorically hold an Adonis festival atop the Acropolis. The Adonia, a festival that is typically regarded as “marginal” and “private” by modern scholars, thus becomes symbolically central and public as the sex-strike held by the women halts the Peloponnesian war. The public space of the Acropolis becomes, notionally, (...)
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  • Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A Morpho‐Logic of Teaching and Learning.Chris Peers - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (7):760-774.
    This article discusses two well‐known texts that respectively describe learning and teaching, drawn from the work of Freud and Plato. These texts are considered in psychoanalytic terms using a methodology drawn from the philosophy of Luce Irigaray. In particular the article addresses Irigaray's approach to the analysis of speech and utterance as a ‘cohesion between the source of the utterance and the utterance itself’. I apply this approach to ask whether educational tradition has fractured the relationship between pedagogy and the (...)
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  • Private and Public: Links Between Symposion and Syssition in Fifth-Century Athens.Ann Steiner - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (2):347-390.
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  • Slaves of Dionysos: Satyrs, Audience, and the Ends of the Oresteia.Mark Griffith - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (2):195-258.
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  • Mixed Pleasures, Blended Discourses: Poetry, Medicine, and the Body in Plato's Philebus 46-47c.Anastasia-Erasmia Peponi - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (1):135-160.
    In Plato's Philebus the last section of the discussion on the falseness of pleasure is dedicated to those pleasures intrinsically mixed with pain. This paper focuses specifically on bodily mixed pleasures, an analysis that extends from 44d to 47c, while its focal point is 46-47c. By adopting the anti-hedonists' methodology, Socrates cunningly transforms his entire analysis of bodily mixed pleasures into a discourse on human disease, in which medical terminology prevails. Two major points are made in the reading suggested here. (...)
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  • A (Reconstructed) New Natural Law Account of Sexuate Selfhood and Rape's Harm.Joshua D. Goldstein & Robin Blake - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (5):734-750.
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  • The Struggle to Love: Pedagogical Eros and the Gift of Transformation.Karsten Kenklies - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 53 (3):547-559.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
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  • The Hidden Host: Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium.Andrea Nye - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):45 - 61.
    Irigaray's reading of Plato's Symposium in Ethique de la difference sexuelle illustrates both the advantages and the limits of her textual practise. Irigaray's attentive listening to the text allows Diotima's voice to emerge from an overlay of Platonic scholarship. But both the ahistorical nature of that listening and Irigaray's assumption of feminine marginality also make her a party to Plato's sabotage of Diotima's philosophy. Understood in historical context, Diotima is not an anomaly in Platonic discourse, but the hidden host of (...)
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  • Endoxa and Epistemology in Aristotle’s Topics.Joseph Bjelde - 2021 - In Joseph Andrew Bjelde, David Merry & Christopher Roser (eds.), Essays on Argumentation in Antiquity. Cham: Springer. pp. 201-214.
    What role, if any, does dialectic play in Aristotle’s epistemology in the Topics? In this paper I argue that it does play a role, but a role that is independent of endoxa. In the first section, I sketch the case for thinking that dialectic plays a distinctively epistemological role—not just a methodological role, or a merely instrumental role in getting episteme. In the second section, I consider three ways it could play that role, on two of which endoxa play at (...)
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  • Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):1 - 27.
    : Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the "rites of love" in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian practices, and (...)
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  • Sexual Orientation, Gender, and Families: Dichotomizing Differences.Susan Moller Okin - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (1):30 - 48.
    Throughout history, women and men have been seen as "opposites" in various respects. Examples from the writings of political theorists illustrate this point, while Virginia Woolf is shown to have departed radically from the general tendency to dichotomize sexual difference. Further, this "need" to dichotomize sexual differences contributes to anxiety about and stigmatization of homosexuality. As the social salience of gender becomes reduced, it is to be expected that hostility to homosexuality will decline.
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  • Phylogenetic Fallacies and Sexual Oppression.Mildred Dickemann - 1992 - Human Nature 3 (1):71-87.
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  • Elenchtike Techne, Erotike Techne: In Margine Al Carmide Platonico.Francesca Pentassuglio - 2020 - Plato Journal 20:55-66.
    The paper aims to investigate the relationship between ἐρωτικὴ τέχνη and ἐλεγκτικὴ τέχνη in Plato’s early dialogues, and especially in the Charmides, through a close exam of the role of ἀντέρως in the dialogical practice and exchanges. In the light of Socrates’ reshaping of the roles of ἐραστής and ἐρώμενος in his view of παιδεία – exemplarily shown in the Symposium – I will analyse some passages of Socrates’ conversations in the Charmides by focusing on the interaction between the one (...)
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  • The Androgynous and Bisexuality in Ancient Legal Codes.Eva Cantarella - 2005 - Diogenes 52 (4):5-14.
    The word 'bisexuality', unknown to the ancients, is used here in two senses to indicate an individual with male and female sex organs or who copulates with people of both sexes. The phenomenon of bisexuality is then analysed with reference to the Greek myth of Hermaphrodite, a 'bisexual' being, born of a nymph's love for a young man of divine descent: in the guise of a fable, the myth recounts the birth of a 'monster', who raises a question-mark over the (...)
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  • Basic Emotions in Social Relationships, Reasoning, and Psychological Illnesses.Keith Oatley & Philip N. Johnson-Laird - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):424-433.
    The communicative theory of emotions postulates that emotions are communications both within the brain and between individuals. Basic emotions owe their evolutionary origins to social mammals, and they enable human beings to use repertoires of mental resources appropriate to recurring and distinctive kinds of events. These emotions also enable them to cooperate with other individuals, to compete with them, and to disengage from them. The human system of emotions has also grafted onto basic emotions propositional contents about the cause of (...)
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  • Fleshly Love, Platonic Love in the Symposium.María Angélica Fierro - 2019 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 59.
    Here I aim to show how the views on the body in Plato´’s Symposium must be considered not as contradictory but as complementary. The three main thesis of this paper are: a) The body is essential for the triggering of “erôs”, insofar as sexual attraction to beautiful bodies is the most natural way in which anyone can start to develop an erotic experience. b) The ascent towards beauty itself implies detachment from a particular body as such in order to move (...)
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  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Harrie McL Currie - 1986 - Theory, Culture and Society 3 (3):189-192.
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  • Paideutikos Eros.Francesca Pentassuglio - 2020 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 30:e03015.
    This paper focuses on the figure and the role of Aspasia in Aeschines’ eponymous dialogue, with special regard to the Milesian’s ‘paideutic’ activity and the double bond connecting it to Socrates’ teaching, namely the elenctic method and a particular application of Σωκρατικὸς ἔρως. The study aims to highlight some crucial traits of Aeschines’ Aspasia by examining three key texts, all numbered among the testimonies on the Aspasia: Cicero’s account in De inventione 1.31.51-53 and two fundamental passages from Xenophon’s Memorabilia and (...)
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  • The Eros of Alcibiades.Victoria Wohl - 1999 - Classical Antiquity 18 (2):349-385.
    Alcibiades is one of the most explicitly sexualized figures in fifth-century Athens, a "lover of the people" whom the demos "love and hate and long to possess" (Ar. Frogs 1425). But his eros fits ill with the normative sexuality of the democratic citizen as we usually imagine it. Simultaneously lover and beloved, effeminate and womanizer, Alcibiades is essentially paranomos, lawless or perverse. This paper explores the relation between Alcibiades' paranomia and the norms of Athenian sexuality, and argues that his eros (...)
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  • When A Dolphin Loves A Boy: Some Greco-Roman and Native American Love Stories.Craig A. Williams - 2013 - Classical Antiquity 32 (1):200-242.
    This article catalogues and interprets an underexplored body of Greek and Roman narratives of animals who fall in love with humans. These narratives, unlike myths and fables, purport to tell of events which occur in the real world of their day; they are stories of desire, but not of copulation; and their configurations of desire are characteristically Greco-Roman. With their anthropocentric and hierarchically configured models of desire, and their emphasis on the impossibility of fulfillment, these narratives illustrate some lasting Western (...)
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  • Moving Images: Fifth-Century Victory Monuments and the Athlete's Allure.Deborah Steiner - 1998 - Classical Antiquity 17 (1):123-150.
    This article treats representations of victors in the Greek athletic games in the artistic and poetic media of the early classical age, and argues that fifth-century sculptors, painters and poets similarly constructed the athlete as an object designed to arouse desire in audiences for their works. After reviewing the very scanty archaeological evidence for the original victory images, I seek to recover something of the response elicited by these monuments by looking to visualizations of athletes in contemporary vase-painting and literary (...)
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  • The Sexuality of Adonis.Joseph D. Reed - 1995 - Classical Antiquity 14 (2):317-346.
    This paper seeks to ascertain the ways in which Adonis and his ritual lament were used by Classical men and women in their constructions of their own gender and the other. The evidence from Classical Athens turns out to originate mainly among men and thus outside the cult, from which men were excluded; the myths and descriptions of the rite that we possess say more about men's attitudes toward themselves and toward women than about the celebrants' motives. Nevertheless, women's attitudes (...)
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  • The Desire for Recognition in Plato’s Symposium.Alessandra Fussi - 2008 - Arethusa 41: 237–262.
    The paper argues that thumos, which is never explicitly mentioned as a part of the soul in the Symposium, plays a major role in the dialogue. In light of the Republic’s characterization of thumos as the source of emotions such as of love of honor, love of victory, admiration for courage, shame, anger, and the propensity to become indignant at real or imaginary wrongs, the paper argues that both Phaedrus’ speech and the speech of Alcibiades are shaped by thumoeidetic motivations. (...)
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  • Roger Just, Women in Athenian Law and Life, , 317p. Hc 1989 £30.00 ISBN 0 415 00346 6; Pb 1991 £9.99 ISBN 0 415 05841 4. [REVIEW]Josine H. Blok - 1991 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 10 (1-2):96-102.
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  • Bildungsphilosophie. Wahrheitsfragen und kulturgeschichtilche Erläuterungen iher Anfänge.Jörg Ruhloff - 2015 - Topologik : Rivista Internazionale di Scienze Filosofiche, Pedagogiche e Sociali 17 (1).
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  • Ancient Homophobia: Prejudices Against Homosexuality in Classical Athens.Bartlomiej Bednarek - 2017 - Humanitas 69:47-62.
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  • Phainomena e explicação na Ética Eudêmia de Aristóteles.Raphael Zillig - 2014 - In Conocimiento, ética y estética en la Filosofía Antigua: Actas del II Simposio Nacional de Filosofía Antigua. Rosário, Argentina: Asociación Argentina de Filosofía Antigua. pp. 330-336.
  • Greek Exercises: The Modern Olympics as Hellenic Appropriation and Reinvention.Louis A. Ruprecht - 2008 - Thesis Eleven 93 (1):72-87.
    `From Aristotle to Us', the conference held at La Trobe University in May 2007, names a powerful and highly influential Romantic trajectory, one which posits a particular conception of the ancients, a particular conception of the moderns, and a complex conception of the relationship between the two. Using the modern Olympic Revival as a case study and a case in point, this article argues that such `exercises' in Greek appropriation always operate with largely unstated assumptions about the nature of the (...)
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  • Review Essay: Mr. Smith Does Not Go to Washington.Bart Schultz - 2007 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (3):366-386.
    A recent spate of books on the life and legacy of the political philosopher Leo Strauss, notably Steven B. Smith's Reading Leo Strauss: Politics, Philosophy, and Judaism , suggests a desperate effort to salvage Strauss and the Straussian school of political philosophy from the wreckage of American neoconservatism. Although a number of these works are quite thoughtful and helpfully counter many of the more extreme (and uglier) charges made concerning the meaning of Straussianism and its political influence, their general drift (...)
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  • Sobre la naturaleza del Éros platónico: ¿daímon o theós?María Angélica Fierro - 2018 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 28:157-189.
    Resumen: Mientras que en Banquete Platón presenta a Éros como un daímon metaxý, i.e. como una divinidad intermedia e intermediaria entre dioses y hombres, en Fedro lo caracteriza, en cambio, como un theós -un dios. Procuraremos mostrar aquí que esto no implica, sin embargo, un cambio doctrinal substancial sino que se trata de dos aproximaciones distintas pero complementarias respecto a la verdadera naturaleza de Éros. Según el Fedro, si bien éros puede permanecer en una expresión puramente física, sin desarrollar su (...)
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  • A nudez do guerreiro grego.Nuno Simões Rodrigues - 2011 - Humanitas 63:201-216.
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  • The Expressive Effect of the Athenian Prostitution Laws.Adriaan Lanni - 2010 - Classical Antiquity 29 (1):45-67.
    This article argues that attention to the expressive function of law suggests that the Athenian laws prohibiting former prostitutes from active political participation may have had a much broader practical impact than previously thought. By changing the social meaning of homosexual pederasty, these laws influenced norms regarding purely private conduct and reached beyond the limited number of politically active citizens likely to be prosecuted under the law. Some appear to have become more careful about courting in public while others adopted (...)
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  • Platón Sobre la Anomalía Cívica Del Filósofo.Lavilla de Lera Jonathan - 2017 - Endoxa 39:53.
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  • The Psychical Forces in Plato’s Phaedrus.Eva Buccioni - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (3):331 – 357.
  • Reviving Greco‐Roman Friendship: A Bibliographical Review.Heather Devere - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):149-187.
  • Colloquium 8.Ruby Blondell - 1998 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):213-238.
  • Rethinking Male and Female: The Pre-Hellenic Philosophy of Mortal Opinion.Andrea Nye - 1988 - History of European Ideas 9 (3):261-280.
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  • Peers on Socrates and Plato.Jim Mackenzie - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (7):1-14.
    There is more to be said about two of the topics Chris Peers addresses in his article Freud, Plato and Irigaray: A morpho-logic of teaching and learning, namely the Socratic method of teaching and Plato’s stance with regard to women and feminism. My purpose in this article is to continue Peers’s discussion of these two topics.
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  • The Hidden Host: Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium.Andrea Nye - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):45-61.
    Irigaray's reading of Plato's Symposium in Ethique de la difference sexuelle illustrates both the advantages and the limits of her textual practise. Irigaray's attentive listening to the text allows Diotima's voice to emerge from an overlay of Platonic scholarship. But both the ahistorical nature of that listening and Irigaray's assumption of feminine marginality also make her a party to Plato's sabotage of Diotima's philosophy. Understood in historical context, Diotima is not an anomaly in Platonic discourse, but the hidden host of (...)
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