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Psychiatric Ethics

Oxford University Press (2009)

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  1. Feminist Philosophy of Disability, Care Ethics and Mental Illness.Andrea Nicki - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):270–272.
  • Neuroethics 1995–2012. A Bibliometric Analysis of the Guiding Themes of an Emerging Research Field.Jon Leefmann, Clement Levallois & Elisabeth Hildt - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
    In bioethics, the first decade of the twenty-first century was characterized by the emergence of interest in the ethical, legal, and social aspects of neuroscience research. At the same time an ongoing extension of the topics and phenomena addressed by neuroscientists was observed alongside its rise as one of the leading disciplines in the biomedical science. One of these phenomena addressed by neuroscientists and moral psychologists was the neural processes involved in moral decision-making. Today both strands of research are often (...)
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  • Bioethical Blind Spots: Four Flaws in the Field of View of Traditional Bioethics. [REVIEW]K. W. M. Fulford - 1993 - Health Care Analysis 1 (2):155-162.
    In this paper it is argued that bioethics has tended to emphasise: ‘high tech’ areas of medicine at the expense of ‘low tech’ areas such as psychiatry; problems arising in treatment at the expense of those associated with diagnosis; questions of fact at the expense of questions of value; and applied ethics at the expense of philosophical theory. The common factor linking these four ‘bioethical blind spots’ is a failute to recognise the full extent to which medicine is an ethical (...)
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  • Sterility and Suggestion: Minor Psychotherapy in the Soviet Union, 1956–1985.Aleksandra Brokman - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (4):83-106.
    This article explores the concept of minor or general psychotherapy championed by physicians seeking to popularise psychotherapy in the post-Stalin Soviet Union. Understood as a set of skills and principles meant to guide behaviour towards and around patients, this form of psychotherapy was portrayed as indispensable for physicians of all specialities as well as for all personnel of medical institutions. This article shows how, as a result of Soviet teaching on the power of suggestion to influence human organisms, every interaction (...)
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  • Neurodiversity.Walter Glannon - 2007 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (2):1.
    The neurological and psychological traits that regulate our thought and behavior fall along a spectrum that extends from the normal to the pathological, from traits that enable us to perform mental and physical functions to traits that interfere with these functions. Yet many people have a constellation of both normal and pathological mental traits. Some even have traits associated with exceptional intellectual or artistic ability despite being diagnosed as having a neurological or psychiatric disorder. These cases raise medical, ethical and (...)
     
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  • A Philosophical Investigation Into Coercive Psychiatric practices_Vol 2.Gerry Roche - 2012 - Dissertation, University of Limerick
    This dissertation seeks to examine the validity of the justification commonly offered for a coercive (1) psychiatric intervention, namely that the intervention was in the ‘best interests’ of the subject and/or that the subject posed a danger to others. As a first step,it was decided to analyse justifications based on ‘best interests’ [the ‘Stage 1’ argument] separately from those based on dangerousness [the ‘Stage 2’ argument]. Justifications based on both were the focus of the ‘Stage 3’ argument. Legal and philosophical (...)
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