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  1. The Role of Individual Variables, Organizational Variables and Moral Intensity Dimensions in Libyan Management Accountants’ Ethical Decision Making.Ahmed Musbah, Christopher J. Cowton & David Tyfa - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (3):335-358.
    This study investigates the association of a broad set of variables with the ethical decision making of management accountants in Libya. Adopting a cross-sectional methodology, a questionnaire including four different ethical scenarios was used to gather data from 229 participants. For each scenario, ethical decision making was examined in terms of the recognition, judgment and intention stages of Rest’s model. A significant relationship was found between ethical recognition and ethical judgment and also between ethical judgment and ethical intention, but ethical (...)
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  • Does Bad Company Corrupt Good Morals? Social Bonding and Academic Cheating Among French and Chinese Teens.Elodie Gentina, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Qinxuan Gu - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):639-667.
    A well-known common wisdom asserts that strong social bonds undermine delinquency. However, there is little empirical evidence to substantiate this assertion regarding adolescence academic cheating across cultures. In this study, we adopt social bonding theory and develop a theoretical model involving four social bonds and adolescence self-reported academic cheating behavior and cheating perception. Based on 913 adolescents in France and China, we show that parental attachment, academic commitment, and moral values curb academic cheating; counterintuitively, peer involvement contributes to cheating. We (...)
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  • Not Just a Gender Numbers Game: How Board Gender Diversity Affects Corporate Risk Disclosure.Andreas Seebeck & Julia Vetter - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):395-420.
    This paper examines how board gender diversity affects corporate risk disclosure. We exploit an exogenous shock on firms’ risk environment created by the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union and analyze related risk disclosure in annual reports of public firms in the UK. Using this unique setting, we mitigate concerns about omitted variables in concurrent studies. The findings suggest that board gender diversity is positively related to corporate risk disclosure. However, our results also indicate that the proportion of (...)
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  • The Gender Effects of Audit Partners on Audit Outcomes: Evidence of Rule 3211 Adoption.Jie Hao, Viet Pham & Meng Guo - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 177 (2):275-304.
    This paper investigates whether the impact of PCAOB Rule 3211 on the quality and cost of audit services differs between female and male audit partners. We find that the improvement of audit quality is more pronounced for female audit partners than male partners after Rule 3211 adoption. Female audit partners are also associated with higher increases in fees and report lags than male counterparts after the adoption of Rule 3211. Further, we find that the presence of female CFOs attenuate the (...)
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  • Effects of Justice and Utilitarianism on Ethical Decision Making: A Cross-Cultural Examination of Gender Similarities and Differences.Rafik I. Beekun, Yvonne Stedham, James W. Westerman & Jeanne H. Yamamura - 2010 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 19 (4):309-325.
    This study investigates the relationship between intention to behave ethically and gender within the context of national culture. Using Reidenbach and Robin's measures of the ethical dimensions of justice and utilitarianism in a sample of business students from three different countries, we found that gender is significantly related to the respondents' intention to behave ethically. Women relied on both justice as well as utilitarianism when making moral decisions. By contrast, men relied only on justice, and did not rely on utilitarianism (...)
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  • Gender Differences in Business Ethics: Justice and Relativist Perspectives.Yvonne Stedham, Jeanne H. Yamamura & Rafik I. Beekun - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (2):163–174.
  • Ethical Perceptions of Business Students in a New Zealand University: Do Gender, Age and Work Experience Matter?Gabriel Eweje & Margaret Brunton - 2010 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 19 (1):95-111.
    Ethical issues at the workplace have once again become topical and important due to considerable adverse publicity surrounding reports of unethical business practices by corporate managers. Accordingly, this paper re-visits the question of whether gender, age and work experience do have an effect on ethical judgement, using 655 business students as respondents. This is necessary as business students are likely to become managers during their career and will face complex ethical concerns and dilemmas in their daily, routine affairs. The findings (...)
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  • Does a 'Care Orientation' Explain Gender Differences in Ethical Decision Making? A Critical Analysis and Fresh Findings.Roberta Bampton & Patrick Maclagan - 2009 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 18 (2):179-191.
    Over the past two decades there has been a great deal of research conducted into the question of gender differences in ethical decision making in organisations. Much of this has been based on questionnaire surveys, typically asking respondents (often students, sometimes professionals) to judge the moral acceptability of actions as described in short cases or vignettes. Overall the results seem inconclusive, although what differences have been noted tend to show women as 'more ethical' than men. The authors of this paper (...)
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  • Ethical Sensitivity of British Accountants. An Intra-Profession Comparison.A. I. M. Fleming - 1995 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 4 (3):166–170.
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  • Does Gender Influence Managers’ Ethics? A Cross‐Cultural Analysis.Chung‐wen Chen, Kristine Velasquez Tuliao, John B. Cullen & Yi‐Ying Chang - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (4):345-362.
    The relationship between gender and ethics has been extensively researched. However, previous studies have assumed that the gender–ethics association is constant; hence, scholars have seldom investigated factors potentially affecting the gender–ethics association. Thus, using managers as the research target, this study examined the relationship between gender and ethics and analyzed the moderating effect of cultural values on the gender–ethics association. The results showed that, compared with female managers, their male counterparts are more willing to justify business-related unethical behaviors such as (...)
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  • Is There a Trade-Off Between Accrual-Based and Real Earnings Management Activities in the Presence of (fe) Male Auditors?Andrews Owusu, Alaa Mansour Zalata, Kamil Omoteso & Ahmed A. Elamer - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 175 (4):815-836.
    Prior research suggests that the presence of high-quality auditors constrains accrual-based earnings management, but it inadvertently leads to higher real activities manipulation. We investigate whether such trade-off exists between accrual-based and real earnings management activities in the presence of female or male auditors. We use a sample of UK firms for the period 2009 to 2016 and find that firms audited by female auditors do not resort to a higher-level real activities manipulation when their ability to engage in accruals management (...)
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  • Culture, Gender, and GMAT Scores: Implications for Corporate Ethics.Raj Aggarwal, Joanne E. Goodell & John W. Goodell - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (1):125-143.
    Business leadership increasingly requires a master’s degree in business and graduate management admission test scores continue to be an important component of applications for admission to such programs. Given the ubiquitous use of GMAT scores as gatekeepers for business leadership, GMAT scores are likely to influence organizational ethical behavior through gender, cultural, and other biases in the GMAT. There is little prior literature in this area and we contribute by empirically documenting that GMAT scores are negatively related to the cultural (...)
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  • Assertiveness Bias in Gender Ethics Research: Why Women Deserve the Benefit of the Doubt: Marketing and Consumer Behavior.Saar Bossuyt & Patrick Van Kenhove - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (3):727-739.
    Gender is one of the most researched and contentious topics in consumer ethics research. It is common for researchers of gender studies to presume that women are more ethical than men because of their reputation for having a selfless, sensitive nature. Nevertheless, we found evidence that women behaved less ethically than men in two field experiments testing a passive form of unethical behavior. Women benefited to a larger extent from a cashier miscalculating the bill in their favor than men. However, (...)
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  • The Role of Gender and Age in Business Students’ Values, CSR Attitudes, and Responsible Management Education: Learnings From the PRME International Survey.Debbie Haski-Leventhal, Mehrdokht Pournader & Andrew McKinnon - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (1):219-239.
    As demand grows from various stakeholders for responsible management education in business schools, it is essential to understand how corporate social responsibility and RME are perceived by various subgroups of business students. Following the principles of theories on moral orientation and moral development, we examined the role of gender and age in determining four indicators of business students’ moral approach in the context of business schools committed to RME and CSR. Based on nearly 1300 responses to a survey, conducted with (...)
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  • A Gendered Approach to Science Ethics for US and UK Physicists.Elaine Howard Ecklund & Di Di - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):183-201.
    Some research indicates that women professionals—when compared to men—may be more ethical in the workplace. Existing literature that discusses gender and ethics is confined to the for-profit business sector and primarily to a US context. In particular, there is little attention paid to gender and ethics in science professions in a global context. This represents a significant gap, as science is a rapidly growing and global professional sector, as well as one with ethically ambiguous areas. Adopting an international comparative perspective, (...)
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  • The Bright and Dark Sides of Religiosity Among University Students: Do Gender, College Major, and Income Matter? [REVIEW]Yuh-Jia Chen & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):531-553.
    We develop a theoretical model involving religiosity [intrinsic (I), extrinsic-social (E s), and extrinsic-personal (E p), Time 1], Machiavellianism (Time 2), and propensity to engage in unethical behavior (Time 2) to investigate direct and indirect paths. We collected two-wave panel data from 359 students who had some work experiences. For the whole sample, intrinsic religiosity (I) indirectly curbed unethical intentions through the absence of Machiavellianism, the bright side of religiosity. Both extrinsic-social (E s) and extrinsic-personal (E p) directly, while extrinsic-social (...)
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  • Gender Differences in Ethical Frameworks and Evaluation of Others' Choices in Ethical Dilemmas.Marshall Schminke - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (1):55-65.
    This paper examines the relationship between gender and ethical decision models employed by managers. Subjects completed a survey that measured the extent to which they focused on actions or the outcomes of those actions in determining whether a behavior was ethical or not. The study also examined subjects' reactions to other managers' responses to ethical dilemmas. Results suggest that men and women do not differ in their underlying ethical models, that they do differ in the way in which they evaluate (...)
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  • Asymmetric Perceptions of Ethical Frameworks of Men and Women in Business and Nonbusiness Settings.Marshall Schminke & Maureen L. Ambrose - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (7):719-729.
    This paper examines the relationship between individuals' gender and their ethical decision models. The study seeks to identify asymmetries in men's and women's approaches to ethical decision making and differences in their perceptions of how same-sex and other-sex managers would likely act in business and nonbusiness situations that present an ethical dilemma. Results indicate that the models employed by men and women differ in both business and nonbusiness settings, that both sexes report changing models when leaving business settings, and that (...)
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  • Empiricism in Business Ethics: Suggested Research Directions. [REVIEW]Diana C. Robertson - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (8):585 - 599.
    This paper considers future directions of empirical research in business ethics and presents a series of recommendations. Greater emphasis should be placed on the normative basis of empirical studies, behavior (rather than attitudes) should be established as the key dependent variable, theoretical models of ethical decision making should be tested, and empirical studies need to focus on theory-building. Extensions of methodology and the unit of analysis are proposed together with recommendations concerning the need for replication and validity, and building links (...)
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  • Determinants of Unethical Business Behaviour Among Owner–Managers.Sunday Samson Babalola - 2009 - Journal of Human Values 15 (1):61-75.
    Several studies have identified entrepreneurship as a key factor in wealth creations in addition to associating certain personality characteristics to its growth. The question is to what extent have these wealth creations performed ethically. The present study is set to explore the cognitive orientation and demographic factors that are associated with unethical business. Two hundred and fifty-six owner–managers in the age range of 24 to 68 years participated in the survey study. Male participants accounted for 63.3 per cent, while female (...)
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  • A Social Cognitive Perspective on the Relationships Between Ethics Education, Moral Attentiveness, and PRESOR.Kurt Wurthmann - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (1):131-153.
    This research examines the relationships between education in business ethics, Reynolds’s (J Appl Psychol 93:1027–1041, 2008) “moral attentiveness” construct, or the extent to which individuals chronically perceive and reflect on morality and moral elements in their experiences, and Singhapakdi et al.’s (J Bus Ethics 15:1131–1140, 1996) measure of perceptions of the role of ethics and social responsibility (PRESOR). Education in business ethics was found to be positively associated with the two identified factors of moral attentiveness, “reflective” and “perceptual” moral attentiveness, (...)
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  • Students' Ethical Behavior in Iran.Mehran Nejati, Reza Jamali & Mostafa Nejati - 2009 - Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (4):277-285.
    Most of research on fostering ethical behavior among students has taken place in US and Europe. This paper seeks to provide additional information to both educators and organizations about the ethical perceptions of Iranian students by investigating the effect of gender on students’ ethical behavior. The authors developed and administered a quantitative questionnaire to a sample of 203 individuals currently pursuing accredited degrees at one of the public universities in Iran. Statistical analysis revealed that male students have a significantly less (...)
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  • The Effects of Gender and Setting on Accountants' Ethically Sensitive Decisions.Robin R. Radtke - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 24 (4):299 - 312.
    This paper investigates whether gender affects ethically sensitive decisions of a personal or business nature. Data from 51 practicing accountants from both public accounting and private industry suggest that while differences exist between female and male accountants in responses to specific situations, overall responses are quite similar. Statistically significant differences were found for only five of the sixteen ethically sensitive situations. Further, when personal and business situations of a similar nature were paired together, two of the eight differences between personal (...)
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  • Ethical Sensitivity of British Accountants. An Intra-Profession Comparison.A. I. M. Fleming - 1995 - Business Ethics: A European Review 4 (3):166-170.
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  • Gender Differences in Business Ethics: Justice and Relativist Perspectives.Yvonne Stedham, Jeanne H. Yamamura & Rafik I. Beekun - 2007 - Business Ethics: A European Review 16 (2):163-174.
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  • Ethical Perceptions of Business Students in a New Zealand University: Do Gender, Age and Work Experience Matter?Gabriel Eweje & Margaret Brunton - 2010 - Business Ethics: A European Review 19 (1):95-111.
  • Does a ‘Care Orientation’ Explain Gender Differences in Ethical Decision Making? A Critical Analysis and Fresh Findings.Roberta Bampton & Patrick Maclagan - 2009 - Business Ethics: A European Review 18 (2):179-191.
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  • Effects of Justice and Utilitarianism on Ethical Decision Making: A Cross-Cultural Examination of Gender Similarities and Differences.Rafik I. Beekun, Yvonne Stedham, James W. Westerman & Jeanne H. Yamamura - 2010 - Business Ethics: A European Review 19 (4):309-325.
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  • Scenarios in Business Ethics Research: Review, Critical Assessment, and Recommendations.James Weber - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (2):137-160.
    A growing number of researchers in the business ethics field have used scenarios as a data gathering technique in their empirical investigations of ethical issues. This paper offers a review and critique of 26 studies that have utilized scenarios to elicit inferences of ethical reasoning, decision making, and/or intended behavior from managerial or student populations. The use of a theoretical foundation, the development of hypotheses, various characteristics germane to the use of scenarios, population and sampIing issues, and the use of (...)
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  • Making Sense of the Research on Gender and Ethics in Business: A Critical Analysis and Extension.Laurie Babin - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (4):61-90.
    This article represents an attempt to organize, critique, and extend research findings on gender differences in business ethics. The focus is on two dependent variables—ethical judgment and behavioral intent. Differences in findings between student and professional groups are noted and theoretical implications are discussed. The new research provided for this article contains two benchmark studies undertaken with identical stimuli and identical measures. These studies were followed by two additional studies, using the same measures but different stimuli, as a partial replication (...)
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  • Personal Values and Ethical Behavior in Accounting Students.Grace Mubako, Kallol Bagchi, Godwin Udo & Marjorie Marinovic - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):161-176.
    This study develops and tests an integrated model that explains how Schwartz’s higher order personal values of Openness to Change, Conservation, Self-Transcendence and Self-Enhancement influence the ethical behavior of accountants. The study further explores the influence of ethics training, gender and religiosity on ethical behavior. A survey instrument was administered to 252 accounting students and the findings reveal that some of the higher order personal values are significant in explaining the ethical behavior of accounting students. The findings also reveal that (...)
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  • Board Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility: Empirical Evidence From France.Rania Beji, Ouidad Yousfi, Nadia Loukil & Abdelwahed Omri - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (1):133-155.
    This study analyzes how the board’s characteristics could be associated with globally corporate social responsibility CSR and specific areas of CSR. It is drawn on all listed firms, in 2016, on the SBF120 between 2003 and 2016. Our results provide strong evidence that diversity in boards and diversity of boards globally are positively associated with corporate social performance. However, they influence differently specific dimensions of CSR performance. First, we show that large boards are positively associated with all areas of CSR (...)
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  • Business Ethics: The Promise of Neuroscience.Diana C. Robertson, Christian Voegtlin & Thomas Maak - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (4):679-697.
    Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience research portend well for furthering understanding of many of the fundamental questions in the field of business ethics, both normative and empirical. This article provides an overview of neuroscience methodology and brain structures, and explores the areas in which neuroscience research has contributed findings of value to business ethics, as well as suggesting areas for future research. Neuroscience research is especially capable of providing insight into individual reactions to ethical issues, while also raising challenging normative (...)
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  • A Comparison of Ethical Evaluations of Business School Faculty and Students: A Pilot Study. [REVIEW]Robert E. Stevens, O. Jeff Harris & Stan Williamson - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (8):611 - 619.
    This paper reports the results of a pilot study of differences in ethical evaluations between business faculty and students at a Southern university. Data were collected from 137 business students (46 freshmen and 67 seniors) and 34 business faculty members. Significant differences were found in 7 of the 30 situations between freshmen and faculty and four situations between seniors and faculty. When the combined means for each group were tested, there was no significant difference in the means at the 0.05 (...)
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  • An Empirical Investigation of the Ethical Perceptions of Future Managers with a Special Emphasis on Gender – Turkish Case.M. G. Serap Atakan, Sebnem Burnaz & Y. Ilker Topcu - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):573 - 586.
    This study presents an empirical investigation of the ethical perceptions of the future managers - Turkish university students majoring in the Business Administration and Industrial Engineering departments of selected public and private Turkish universities - with a special emphasis on gender. The perceptions of the university students pertaining to the business world, the behaviors of employees, and the factors leading to unethical behavior are analyzed. The statistically significant differences reveal that female students have more ethical perceptions about the Turkish business (...)
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  • Ethical Differences Between Men and Women in the Sales Profession.Leslie M. Dawson - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (11):1143-1152.
    This research addresses the question of whether men and women in sales differ in their ethical attitudes and decision making. The study asked 209 subjects to respond to 20 ethical scenarios, half of which were "relational" and half "non-relational." The study concludes (1) that there are significant ethical differences between the sexes in situations that involve relational issues, but not in non-relational situations, and (2) that gender-based ethical differences change with age and years of experience. The implications of these finding (...)
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  • How Does Ethical Leadership Trickle Down? Test of an Integrative Dual-Process Model.Zhen Wang, Haoying Xu & Yukun Liu - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (3):691-705.
    Although the trickle-down effect of ethical leadership has been documented in the literature, its underlying mechanism still remains largely unclear. To address this gap, we develop a cross-level dual-process model to explain how the effect occurs. Drawing on social learning theory, we hypothesize that the ethical leadership of high-level managers could cascade to middle-level supervisors via its impact on middle-level supervisors’ two ethical expectations. Using a sample of 69 middle-level supervisors and 381 subordinates across 69 sub-branches from a large banking (...)
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  • A Multifocal and Integrative View of the Influencers of Ethical Attitudes Using Qualitative Configurational Analysis.Nicole A. Celestine, Catherine Leighton & Chris Perryer - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):103-122.
    Ethical attitudes and behaviour are complex. This complexity extends to the influencers operating at different levels both outside and within the organisation, and in different combinations for different individuals. There is hence a growing need to understand the proximal and distal influencers of ethical attitudes, and how these operate in concert at the individual, organisational, and societal levels. Few studies have attempted to combine these main research streams and systematically examine their combined impact. The minority of studies that have taken (...)
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  • Power, Status and Expectations: How Narcissism Manifests Among Women CEOs.Alicia R. Ingersoll, Christy Glass, Alison Cook & Kari Joseph Olsen - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 158 (4):893-907.
    Firms face mounting pressure to appoint ethical leaders who will avoid unnecessary risk, scandal and crisis. Alongside mounting evidence that narcissistic leaders place organizations at risk, there is a growing consensus that women are more ethical, transparent and risk-averse than men. We seek to interrogate these claims by analyzing whether narcissism is as prevalent among women CEOs as it is among men CEOs. We further analyze whether narcissistic women CEOs take the same types of risk as narcissistic men CEOs. Drawing (...)
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  • Influence of Gender and Ethical Training on University Teachers Sensitivity Towards the Integration of Ethics in Business Studies.Marcela Espinosa-Pike, Edurne Aldazabal & Ana Martín-Arroyuelos - 2012 - Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (1):9-25.
    The aim of this work is to analyse the effect of gender and ethical training received on the sensitivity of university teachers towards the inclusion of ethics in graduate business studies. To this end, a study has been carried out that uses four ethical sensitivity indicators for teachers: their opinion about the need to include ethics in the world of business, their opinion about the need to include ethics in University education involving business studies, the current integration of ethics by (...)
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  • Exploring Differential Ethical Perspectives Among Ghanaian Students.Randolph Nsor-Ambala - 2020 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 9 (2):143-170.
    The study uses a dataset from Ghana to test for differential features regarding ethical orientation, among students based on eight categorisations. Data was collected by a questionnaire. The respondents were business students within Ghanaian universities and the number of useable responses was 79, out of a possible 100 students contacted, from an online survey. The results are mixed but substantially align with earlier studies except for a few deviations and a synthesis of the literature is used to explain the findings (...)
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  • Ethical Judgments on Selected Accounting Issues: An Empirical Study. [REVIEW]Keith G. Stanga & Richard A. Turpen - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (10):739 - 747.
    This study investigates the judgments made by accounting majors when confronted with selected ethical dilemmas that pertain to accounting practice. Drawing upon literature in philosophy and moral psychology, it then examines these judgments for potential gender differences. Five case studies, each involving a specific ethical dilemma that a practicing accountant might face, were administered to 151 acounting majors (males = 67; females = 84), in four sections of intermediate accounting II at a large, state university. The results suggest that although (...)
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  • Toward a Profile of Student Software Piraters.Ronald R. Sims, Hsing K. Cheng & Hildy Teegen - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (8):839 - 849.
    Efforts to counter software piracy are an increasing focus of software publishers. This study attempts to develop a profile of those who illegally copy software by looking at undergraduate and graduate students and the extent to which they pirate software. The data indicate factors that can be used to profile the software pirater. In particular, males were found to pirate software more frequently than females and older students more than younger students, based on self-reporting.
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  • Are Women More Ethical Than Men?Andrew Sikula & Adelmiro D. Costa - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (11):859 - 871.
  • Egoistic and Ethical Orientations of University Students Toward Work-Related Decisions.Jon M. Shepard & Linda S. Hartenian - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (4):303 - 310.
    An onslaught of ethically questionable actions by top government, business, and religious leaders during the 1980s has brought the issue of ethics in decision making to the forefront of public consciousness. This study examines the ethical orientation of university students in four decision-making situations. The dependent variable — ethical orientation toward work-related decisions — is measured through student responses to questions following four work-related vignettes. Possible responses to each vignette are structured to permit categorization of respondents into two broad orientations: (...)
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  • Unravelling the Ethical Decision-Making Process: Clues From an Empirical Study Comparingfortune 1 000 Executives and MBA Students. [REVIEW]James R. Harris & Charlotte D. Sutton - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (10):805 - 817.
    Using a nationwide survey, this study compared the ethical values and decision processes ofFortune executives and MBA students. Statistically significant differences in ethical values were found by class of respondent, gender, and professed decision approach. MBAs were also found to process ethical decisions differently than business professionals.
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  • The Ethical Attitudes of Students as a Function of Age, Sex and Experience.Susan C. Borkowski & Yusuf J. Ugras - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (12):961 - 979.
    In this paper, we explore whether the ethical positions of students are firmly entrenched when they enter college, or do they change due to maturity, experience to ethical discussions in coursework, work experience, or a combination of factors. This study compared the ethical attitudes of freshmen and junior accounting majors, and graduate MBA students when confronted with two ethical dilemmas. Undergraduates were found to be more justice oriented than their MBA counterparts, who were more utilitarian in their ethical approach. While (...)
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  • Circles of Ethics: The Impact of Proximity on Moral Reasoning.Cristina Wildermuth, Carlos A. De Mello E. Souza & Timothy Kozitza - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (1):17-42.
    We report the results of an experiment designed to determine the effects of psychological proximity—proxied by awareness of pain and friendship—on moral reasoning. Our study tests the hypotheses that a moral agent’s emphasis on justice decreases with proximity, while his/her emphasis on care increases. Our study further examines how personality, gender, and managerial status affect the importance of care and justice in moral reasoning. We find support for the main hypotheses. We also find that care should be split into two (...)
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  • Ethics, Diversity Management, and Financial Reporting Quality.Réal Labelle, Rim Makni Gargouri & Claude Francoeur - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (2):335-353.
    This article proposes and empirically tests a theoretical framework incorporating Reidenbach and Robin’s (J Bus Ethics 10(4):273–284, 1991 ) conceptual model of corporate moral development. The framework is used to examine the relation between governance and business ethics, as proxied by diversity management (DM), and financial reporting quality, as proxied by the magnitude of earnings management (EM). The level of DM and governance quality are measured in accordance with the ratings of Jantzi Research (JR), a leading provider of social and (...)
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  • Investigating the Effects of Gender on Consumers’ Moral Philosophies and Ethical Intentions.Connie R. Bateman & Sean R. Valentine - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):393-414.
    Using information collected from a convenience sample of graduate and undergraduate students affiliated with a Midwestern university in the United States, this study determined the extent to which gender is related to consumers’ moral philosophies and ethical intentions. Multivariate and univariate results indicated that women were more inclined than men to utilize both consequence-based and rule-based moral philosophies in questionable consumption situations. In addition, women placed more importance on an overall moral philosophy than did men, and women had higher intentions (...)
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