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  1. The Means to Justify the End: Combating Cyber Harassment in Social Media.Tom van Laer - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (1):85-98.
    Cyber harassment can have harmful effects on social media users, such as emotional distress and, consequently, withdrawal from social network sites or even life itself. At the same time, users are often upset when network providers intervene and deem such an intrusion an unjust occurrence. This article analyzes how decisions to intervene can be communicated in such a way that users consider them adequate and acceptable. A first experiment shows that informational justice perceptions of social network users depend on the (...)
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  • Does It Pay to Invest in Japanese Women? Evidence from the MSCI Japan Empowering Women Index.Jonathan Peillex, Sabri Boubaker & Breeda Comyns - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):595-613.
    In Japan, income, authority, and prestige are unequally distributed between men and women, even if they share the same occupational level. These inequalities are perceived as an ethical issue because they go against the principle of equal treatment at work. Nowadays, Japanese companies are under growing political and regulatory pressure to increase the hiring, promotion, and empowerment of female employees. In this context, the first equity index that tracks the financial performance of the best Japanese companies in terms of gender (...)
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  • Subjective Performance Evaluation and Gender Discrimination.Victor S. Maas & Raquel Torres-González - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):667-681.
    Gender discrimination continues to be a problem in organizations. It is therefore important that organizations use performance evaluation methods that ensure equal opportunities for men and women. This article reports the results of an experiment to investigate whether and, if so, how the gender of the rater and that of the ratee moderate the relationship between the level of subjectivity in performance appraisals and organizational attractiveness. Participants in the experiment were 313 undergraduate students. We predicted, and indeed established, that as (...)
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  • How Could You be so Gullible? Scams and Over-Trust in Organizations.Hervé Laroche, Véronique Steyer & Christelle Théron - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (3):641-656.
    Trust is a key ingredient of business activities. Scams are spectacular betrayals of trust. When the victim is a powerful organization that does not look vulnerable at first sight, we can suspect that this organization has developed an excessive trust, or over-trust. In this article, we take over-trust as the result of the intentional production of gullibility by the scammer. The analysis of a historically famous scam case, the Elf “Great Sniffer Hoax,” suggests that the victim is made gullible by (...)
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  • Discrimination in Services: How Service Recovery Efforts Change with Customer Accent.Jonas Holmqvist & Carol Azab - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 180 (1):355-372.
    Discrimination represents an important moral problem in the field of business ethics, and is often directed against minority groups. While most of the extant literature studies discrimination against employees, this paper studies discrimination against minority customers, addressing whether customers speaking English with an accent are discriminated against when contacting companies with a complaint. We draw upon the two literature streams of business ethics and service recovery to address discrimination in the service recovery process, as the recovery process after a service (...)
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  • Gender bias in internet employment: A study of career advancement opportunities for women in the field of ICT.Andra Gumbus & Frances Grodzinsky - 2004 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 2 (3):133-142.
    Women as individuals experience subtle discrimination regarding career development opportunities as evidenced by research on the Glass Ceiling. This paper looks at the ramifications of technology, specifically the Internet, and how it affects women’s career opportunities.
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  • The intersection of gender and age: an exploration.Michelle Gander - 2014 - Perspectives: Policy and Practice in Higher Education 18 (1):9-13.
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  • The Glass Ceiling for Women Managers: Antecedents and Consequences for Work-Family Interface and Well-Being at Work.Audrey Babic & Isabelle Hansez - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Despite significant promotion of diversity in companies, as well as legislation for equal opportunities for women and men, it must be noted that women still remain largely in the minority in decision-making positions. This observation reflects the phenomenon of the glass ceiling that constitutes vertical discrimination within companies against women. Although the glass ceiling has generated research interest, some authors have pointed out that theoretical models have made little attempt to develop an understanding of this phenomenon and its implications. Therefore, (...)
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  • Can businesses effectively regulate employee conduct?: The antecedents of rule adherence in work settings.Tom R. Tyler & Steven L. Blader - forthcoming - Ethics.
     
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