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  1. Unethical Pro-organizational Behavior: A Systematic Review and Future Research Agenda.Madhurima Mishra, Koustab Ghosh & Dheeraj Sharma - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 179 (1):63-87.
    Since the conceptualization of unethical pro-organizational behavior ten years ago, scholarly interest in exploring this phenomenon has multiplied. Given a burgeoning body of empirical research, a review of unethical pro-organizational behavior literature is warranted. This study, therefore, systematically reviews the extant literature on unethical pro-organizational behavior and presents a comprehensive theory-based review of the past developments in this field. We classify previous studies based on their underlying theoretical perspectives and discuss the antecedents and consequences of unethical pro-organizational behavior in work (...)
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  • Organizational Event Stigma: Typology, Processes, and Stickiness.Kim Clark & Yuan Li - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    What do events such as scandals, industrial accidents, activist threats, and mass shootings have in common? They can all trigger an audience’s stigma judgment about the organization involved in the event. Despite the prevalence of these stigma-triggering events, management research has provided little conceptual work to characterize the dimensions and processes of organizational event stigma. This article takes the perspective of the evaluating audience to unpack the stigma judgment process, identify critical dimensions for categorizing types of event stigma, and explore (...)
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  • How Leaders Influence (un)Ethical Behaviors Within Organizations: A Laboratory Experiment on Reporting Choices.Mario Daniele Amore, Orsola Garofalo & Alice Guerra - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    We use a lab experiment to examine whether and how leaders influence workers’ ethical behavior through financial reporting choices. We randomly assign the role of leaders or workers to subjects, who can choose to report an outcome via automatic or self-reporting. Self-reporting allows for profitable and undetectable earnings manipulation. We vary the leaders’ ability to choose the reporting method and to punish workers. We show that workers are more likely to choose automatic reporting when their leader voluntarily does so and (...)
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