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Destabilizing Theory: Contemporary Feminist Debates

Stanford University Press (1992)

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  1. Beyond the Public/Private Dichotomy: Relational Space and Sexual Inequalities.Chris Armstrong & Judith Squires - 2002 - Contemporary Political Theory 1 (3):261-283.
    The public/private dichotomy has long been the object of considerable attention for feminists. We argue that, by focusing their attention on a divide which has declined in importance, feminists may fail to keep up with the current means by which sexual inequalities are perpetuated. Furthermore, by concentrating on this divide feminists risk reproducing such dichotomous thinking in their own work, discursively perpetuating that which they had initially hoped to displace. We begin by surveying feminist critiques of the public/private dichotomy, consider (...)
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  • Diversity, Values and Social Change: Renegotiating a Consensus on Sex Education.Rachel Thomson - 1997 - Journal of Moral Education 26 (3):257-271.
  • Complexity Theory, Systems Theory, and Multiple Intersecting Social Inequalities.Sylvia Walby - 2007 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (4):449-470.
    This article contributes to the revision of the concept of system in social theory using complexity theory. The old concept of social system is widely discredited; a new concept of social system can more adequately constitute an explanatory framework. Complexity theory offers the toolkit needed for this paradigm shift in social theory. The route taken is not via Luhmann, but rather the insights of complexity theorists in the sciences are applied to the tradition of social theory inspired by Marx, Weber, (...)
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  • (In)Quest of Liberal Feminism.Loretta Kensinger - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (4):178 - 197.
    I am interested in exploring the usefulness and limits of traditional categories of feminist theory, such as those laid out by Alison Jaggar (1977; 1983). I begin the analysis by critically comparing various treatments of liberal feminism. I focus throughout this investigation on uncovering ways that current frameworks privilege white authors and concerns, recreate the split between theory and activism, and obscure long histories of theoretical and practical coalition and alliance work.
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  • Is Theory Gendered?Elizabeth Frazer - 1996 - Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (2):169–189.
  • Theoretical Perspectives as Ideal‐Types: Typologies as Means Not Ends.Rachel Torr - 2008 - Social Epistemology 22 (2):145 – 164.
    In this paper I question the tendency within some feminist circles to criticise attempts to develop typologies that delineate different feminist theoretical perspectives. I agree that many of the criticisms are valid, but only if typologies are viewed in a particular way. This particular way is when typologies are regarded as ahistorical, all-encompassing entities containing discrete categories that are designed for the once and for all fixing of individuals and their work in one box. Reading Max Weber through Karl Mannheim's (...)
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  • `In the Belly of the Beast': Constructing Femininities in Engineering Organizations.Elin Kvande - 1999 - European Journal of Women's Studies 6 (3):305-328.
    This article explores how female graduate engineers construct femininities in male-dominated organizations. By applying a dynamic relational understanding of gender it is argued that different versions of femininities are constructed through associations to sameness and difference. The graduate engineering profession is closely connected to hegemonic masculinity, not least by the strong representation of technology and a management system itself heavily connected to current hegemonic masculinity. The female engineers stand in a position which can be described as `the dilemma of difference' (...)
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  • But the Empress has No Clothes!: Some Awkward Questions About the ‘Missing Revolution’ in Feminist Theory.Sue Wise & Liz Stanley - 2000 - Feminist Theory 1 (3):261-288.
    Who owns feminist theory? and just what is meant by the idea of ‘theory’? We explore these fundamental questions as part of interrogating some emergent orthodoxies about feminist theory, proposing that there is a ‘missing revolution’ in feminist thinking, for while ideas about feminist epistemology, methodology and ethics have been fundamentally reworked, those concerning feminist theory have not. Our purpose is to stimulate a debate about the form of feminist theory, rather than the more usual controversies about its content; and (...)
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  • The `Emotional' Body.Simon J. Williams & Gillian A. Bendelow - 1996 - Body and Society 2 (3):125-139.
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  • Situated Voices: ‘Black Women's Experience’ and Social Work.Gail Lewis - 1996 - Feminist Review 53 (1):24-56.
    The article uses a discourse analytic approach to explore some of the ways in which black women social workers invoke the category ‘experience’ as a means by which to mediate their structural and discursive location in social services departments. The article draws on current feminist theoretical debates about ‘experience’ and the ‘multivocality’ of black women as they construct dialogic spaces with diverse interlocutors. In so doing an argument is made for an understanding of ‘black women's experience’ as constituted rather than (...)
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  • Insider Perspectives or Stealing the Words Out of Women's Mouths: Interpretation in the Research Process.Diane Reay - 1996 - Feminist Review 53 (1):57-73.
    This article examines the ways in which social class differences between the researcher and female respondents affect data analysis. I elaborate the ways in which my class background, just as much as my gender, affects all stages of the research process from theoretical starting points to conclusions. The influences of reflexivity, power and ‘truth’ on the interpretative process are developed by drawing on fieldnotes and interviews from an ethnographic study of women's involvement in their children's primary schooling. Complexities of social (...)
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  • Warmth and Unity with All Women?: Historicizing Racism in the Australian Women's Movement1.Adele Murdolo - 1996 - Feminist Review 52 (1):69-86.
    In this paper I discuss the four Women and Labour conferences which were held in Australian capital cities over the seven years between 1978 and 1984. I explore the ways in which the history of Australian feminist activism during this period could be written, questioning in particular the claim that the Women and Labour conferences have been central to the history of Australian feminism. I discuss the ways in which a historical sense could be established, using writings about the conferences (...)
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  • A Social Theory of Gender: Connell's Gender and Power.Zarina Maharaj - 1995 - Feminist Review 49 (1):50-65.
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  • Public and Private Citizenship: From Gender Invisibility to Feminist Inclusiveness.Raia Prokhovnik - 1998 - Feminist Review 60 (1):84-104.
    Conceptions of citizenship which rest on an abstract and universal notion of the individual founder on their inability to recognize the political relevance of gender. Such conceptions, because their ‘gender-neutrality’ has the effect of excluding women, are not helpful to the project of promoting the full citizenship of women. The question of citizenship is often reduced to either political citizenship, in terms of an instrumental notion of political participation, or social citizenship, in terms of an instrumental notion of economic dependence. (...)
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  • Women's Studies: Between a Rock and a Hard Place or Just Another Cell in the Beehive?Helen Crowley - 1999 - Feminist Review 61 (1):131-150.
    The article traces the history of Women's Studies from its beginnings as the ‘intellectual arm of the women's movement’. It argues that the complex story of Women's Studies has been marked by both ambiguity and uncertainty as well as sustained political commitment in the face of both institutional opposition and feminist ambivalence about Women's Studies as a field of scholarship. The development of Women's Studies occurs through crucial shifts in the theoretical paradigms of feminism and the political preoccupations of the (...)
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  • The End of Religion? Examining the Role of Religiousness, Materialism, and Long-Term Orientation on Consumer Ethics in Indonesia.Denni Arli & Fandy Tjiptono - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):1-16.
    Various studies on the impact of religiousness on consumer ethics have produced mixed results and suggested further clarification on the issue. Therefore, this article examines the effect of religiousness, materialism, and long-term orientation on consumer ethics in Indonesia. The results from 356 respondents in Indonesia, the largest Muslim population in the world, showed that intrinsic religiousness positively affected consumer ethics, while extrinsic social religiousness negatively affected consumer ethics. However, extrinsic personal religiousness did not affect consumer ethical beliefs dimensions. Unlike other (...)
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  • ‘Divine Love’ in the Philosophical Works of Luce Irigaray: A Critical Quest of a Korean Woman Seeking Women’s Spirituality.Mikyung Lee - unknown
    This dissertation provides an understanding of ‘divine love’ in Luce Irigaray’s philosophical works. It also attempts to draw implications from her notion of ‘divine love’ for a feminist theological perspective. In order to engage with Irigaray’s concept of ‘divine love’, a rather personal approach is being used as a methodology, which is apposite for Irigaray’s rhetorical style. The idea of ‘divine love’ is well treated in the texts of Irigaray in conjunction with the four elements. Therefore, the first chapter sets (...)
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